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December 14, 1986 | BEVIS HILLIER
Two years ago, Jerry Slocum built a "museum" in his Beverly Hills garden to house his collection of more than 10,000 puzzles. The collection had long since outgrown the bedroom it had inherited when Slocum's older son went off to college. Slocum and his wife, Margot, had a Murphy bed built into the museum, which is used by visiting family members. But it has another purpose. "Puzzle collectors visit with us," Slocum says.
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MAGAZINE
December 14, 1986 | BEVIS HILLIER
Two years ago, Jerry Slocum built a "museum" in his Beverly Hills garden to house his collection of more than 10,000 puzzles. The collection had long since outgrown the bedroom it had inherited when Slocum's older son went off to college. Slocum and his wife, Margot, had a Murphy bed built into the museum, which is used by visiting family members. But it has another purpose. "Puzzle collectors visit with us," Slocum says.
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MAGAZINE
December 16, 2001 | LESLEE KOMAIKO
Behind the Beverly Hills home that retired Hhughes aircraft exec Jerry Slocum shares with his wife, Margot, is a nondescript building with one distinguishing feature: a geometric wooden thingamajig on the door. It looks like modern art, but it's really a "Burr puzzle," whose interlocking rods must be slid out just so for the door to open--a fitting entry to a collector's lovingly assembled puzzle museum.
SPORTS
November 12, 2007 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
This is how UCLA Coach Ben Howland prefers his preseason basketball tournaments -- two games at home and none in Maui. The second-ranked Bruins begin play tonight in the first round of the O'Reilly Auto Parts CBE Classic. Pauley Pavilion is the site of one of four tournament regionals; Maryland, Missouri and Michigan State are the other host schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1986 | ZAN DUBIN
Rubik's Cube captured the imagination of millions and made its namesake rich. But the craze the puzzle created was hardly the first of its kind. More than 100 years ago, Sam Loyd invented a hand-size sliding block puzzle that was as popular in its day as Rubik's Cube, said Sharon K. Emanuelli, curator of the world's largest and most diverse puzzle exhibit ongoing at the Craft and Folk Art Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1986 | MORGAN GENDEL, Times Staff Writer
Joan Rivers looked fairly calm late last week as she ate catered Chinese food off a plastic plate in an office at KTTV in Hollywood. The familiar razor-blade voice was silent, and the manicured fingers, often seen in mid-jab, were occupied with utensils. In place of the flashy designer originals, she wore a simple black dress, and reading glasses rested low on her nose. The moment was deceptive.
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