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Jerry Smith

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SPORTS
September 7, 1986 | THOMAS BOSWELL, The Washington Post
In the 50-year history of the Washington Redskins, only two men scored more touchdowns than Jerry Smith. Only two regulars ever played in more games. Only one receiver caught more passes. Many a Redskin all-pro, like Bobby Mitchell or Larry Brown, never equaled Smith's 60 visits to the end zone. Yet, in his 13 seasons, you never heard too much about Jerry Smith. He was shy and quiet. Though he didn't avoid publicity, he was lukewarm toward it. You'll hear plenty about him now. And you should.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2000
Frank M. Sifuentes (Voices, Jan. 29) states he is a long-forgotten soldier in the "war on poverty," which is a noble calling. I appreciate his goodwill and efforts on behalf of the poor and uneducated. However, Medicare does "dole" out $200 billion a year. Medicare expense is not included in the mandatory Social Security "contributions" extracted from workers. The $48 per month that he and Mrs. Sifuentes each pay per month is but a small portion of the cost of Medicare benefits. For example, in Southern California, HMOs are reimbursed in excess of $750 per month for Medicare recipients.
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SPORTS
October 17, 1986 | GEORGE SOLOMON, The Washington Post
Jerry Smith, one of the leading pass receivers in the National Football League during his 13 seasons with the Washington Redskins, died Wednesday night at Holy Cross Hospital after fighting the disease AIDS for nearly a year. Smith was 43. He recently was invited to be inducted into the Washington Hall of Stars at RFK Stadium before the Redskin game against Minnesota here Nov. 2.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1997 | LANIE GOODMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When director Tony Gatlif arrived in the old port in Nice three years ago to scout locations for his latest film, "Mondo," little did he know he would find one of his future stars propped against the doors of a church, waiting for spare change from the parishioners. "I was struck by his beautiful gaze," Gatlif says.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | From the Washington Post
Jerry Smith, one of the leading pass receivers in the National Football League during his 13 seasons with the Washington Redskins, died of AIDS Wednesday night at Holy Cross Hospital after fighting the disease for nearly a year. Smith, 43, who went public with his illness last August, is the first professional athlete known to have died from AIDS-related complications, a disease which has claimed more than 13,000 lives in the United States since its discovery in 1981.
SPORTS
August 26, 1986 | GEORGE SOLOMON, The Washington Post
The letter arrived at the family house this summer. It invited Jerry Smith, who caught 421 passes for 5,496 yards and 60 touchdowns in 13 seasons as a tight end with the Washington Redskins, to be inducted into the Washington Hall of Stars at RFK Stadium this fall. In the room at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring, Md., where Jerry Smith is fighting the deadly disease AIDS, his mother, Laverne, asked, "Do you think when they find out, they'll change their mind?"
NEWS
December 29, 1985
An open letter to local independent stations: Please bring back "Fernwood 2-Night." I'm tired of watching "Three's Company" 11 times a week. Take a step away from insanity and bring real entertainment back to TV. Jerry Smith, Burbank
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1987
The current controversy sparked by Police Chief Daryl F. Gates regarding his desire to arrest transients illegally sleeping on sidewalks on Skid Row calls to mind a comment made by Anatole France: "The law, in its majestic equality, forbids the rich as well as the poor to sleep under bridges, to beg in the streets and to steal bread." JERRY SMITH Alhambra
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1989
By his refusal to allow not even a nickel raise in the minimum wage of $3.35 throughout his two terms, President Reagan added immeasurable suffering to the bleak lives of millions of Americans. That moral obtuseness is now being addressed by Congress. However, in spite of his vision of a "kinder, gentler America," President Bush has vowed to veto the proposed increase which will gradually reach $4.55 by 1991. This promised veto speaks more clearly than the catchy rhetoric of his speech writers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2000
Frank M. Sifuentes (Voices, Jan. 29) states he is a long-forgotten soldier in the "war on poverty," which is a noble calling. I appreciate his goodwill and efforts on behalf of the poor and uneducated. However, Medicare does "dole" out $200 billion a year. Medicare expense is not included in the mandatory Social Security "contributions" extracted from workers. The $48 per month that he and Mrs. Sifuentes each pay per month is but a small portion of the cost of Medicare benefits. For example, in Southern California, HMOs are reimbursed in excess of $750 per month for Medicare recipients.
SPORTS
June 22, 1996
Mike Downey's piece on Bill Shoemaker [June 13] was masterfully written, showing how the human spirit can overcome everything, even the crippling aftermath of a near-fatal accident. But why didn't Downey remind us that the accident was the result of intoxication? We can never forget the tragedy caused in our society by drunk drivers. It's possible that a comment from Downey or Shoemaker might keep a drunk driver off the streets. JERRY SMITH Alhambra As for fighting spirit, let me remind Mike Downey of Bill Shoemaker's fight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1989
By his refusal to allow not even a nickel raise in the minimum wage of $3.35 throughout his two terms, President Reagan added immeasurable suffering to the bleak lives of millions of Americans. That moral obtuseness is now being addressed by Congress. However, in spite of his vision of a "kinder, gentler America," President Bush has vowed to veto the proposed increase which will gradually reach $4.55 by 1991. This promised veto speaks more clearly than the catchy rhetoric of his speech writers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1987
The current controversy sparked by Police Chief Daryl F. Gates regarding his desire to arrest transients illegally sleeping on sidewalks on Skid Row calls to mind a comment made by Anatole France: "The law, in its majestic equality, forbids the rich as well as the poor to sleep under bridges, to beg in the streets and to steal bread." JERRY SMITH Alhambra
SPORTS
October 17, 1986 | GEORGE SOLOMON, The Washington Post
Jerry Smith, one of the leading pass receivers in the National Football League during his 13 seasons with the Washington Redskins, died Wednesday night at Holy Cross Hospital after fighting the disease AIDS for nearly a year. Smith was 43. He recently was invited to be inducted into the Washington Hall of Stars at RFK Stadium before the Redskin game against Minnesota here Nov. 2.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | From the Washington Post
Jerry Smith, one of the leading pass receivers in the National Football League during his 13 seasons with the Washington Redskins, died of AIDS Wednesday night at Holy Cross Hospital after fighting the disease for nearly a year. Smith, 43, who went public with his illness last August, is the first professional athlete known to have died from AIDS-related complications, a disease which has claimed more than 13,000 lives in the United States since its discovery in 1981.
SPORTS
September 7, 1986 | THOMAS BOSWELL, The Washington Post
In the 50-year history of the Washington Redskins, only two men scored more touchdowns than Jerry Smith. Only two regulars ever played in more games. Only one receiver caught more passes. Many a Redskin all-pro, like Bobby Mitchell or Larry Brown, never equaled Smith's 60 visits to the end zone. Yet, in his 13 seasons, you never heard too much about Jerry Smith. He was shy and quiet. Though he didn't avoid publicity, he was lukewarm toward it. You'll hear plenty about him now. And you should.
SPORTS
June 22, 1996
Mike Downey's piece on Bill Shoemaker [June 13] was masterfully written, showing how the human spirit can overcome everything, even the crippling aftermath of a near-fatal accident. But why didn't Downey remind us that the accident was the result of intoxication? We can never forget the tragedy caused in our society by drunk drivers. It's possible that a comment from Downey or Shoemaker might keep a drunk driver off the streets. JERRY SMITH Alhambra As for fighting spirit, let me remind Mike Downey of Bill Shoemaker's fight.
SPORTS
September 6, 1986
I found the article on Jerry Smith so disturbing, not only because of its content, but because I feel, as a member of the terrified and often misinformed public, I have once again been victimized by half-truths regarding the heinous disease, AIDS. While my heart goes out to Jerry and all sufferers of the disease, why must we be made even more paranoid of its dangers than we already are? On the surface, it appears he has fallen victim of the most unlikely of tragic circumstances (yet another heterosexual unfortunate enough to contract the deadly disease through unknown means)
SPORTS
September 6, 1986
I found the article on Jerry Smith so disturbing, not only because of its content, but because I feel, as a member of the terrified and often misinformed public, I have once again been victimized by half-truths regarding the heinous disease, AIDS. While my heart goes out to Jerry and all sufferers of the disease, why must we be made even more paranoid of its dangers than we already are? On the surface, it appears he has fallen victim of the most unlikely of tragic circumstances (yet another heterosexual unfortunate enough to contract the deadly disease through unknown means)
SPORTS
August 26, 1986 | GEORGE SOLOMON, The Washington Post
The letter arrived at the family house this summer. It invited Jerry Smith, who caught 421 passes for 5,496 yards and 60 touchdowns in 13 seasons as a tight end with the Washington Redskins, to be inducted into the Washington Hall of Stars at RFK Stadium this fall. In the room at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring, Md., where Jerry Smith is fighting the deadly disease AIDS, his mother, Laverne, asked, "Do you think when they find out, they'll change their mind?"
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