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Jerry Stahl

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November 21, 2013 | By Joseph Lapin
Jerry Stahl believes it's impossible to shock an audience anymore, but in his new novel, "Happy Mutant Baby Pills" (Harper Perennial, $14.99 pp.), he comes close. His main character, Lloyd, falls in love with a murderous woman named Nora who wants to take down Monsanto and Dow Chemical. After an absurd, paranoid and somehow comic murder spree, they decide to create a mutant baby in protest of capitalism by ingesting as many prescriptions, GMOs and pesticide-laden products as possible - while shooting endless amounts of heroin.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
It was a lopsided victory of winks over smirks at "With a Wink and a Smirk," a Saturday afternoon panel discussion at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books that featured comic novelists Diana Wagman, Jerry Stahl, Mark Haskell Smith and Jim Magnuson and was moderated by David Kipen. That revelation, though, didn't come until close to the end of a free-wheeling, fast-moving and very humorous chat that included each author reading just the very first page (no more, no less) from one of his or her recently published books, and touched on taboo humor topics and the source of humor in the comic novel.
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BOOKS
July 1, 2007 | Steve Almond, Steve Almond's new collection of essays, "Not That You Asked," will be published in September.
THERE'S a wonderful moment in Jerry Stahl's new story collection, "Love Without," in which a beleaguered son arrives at the nudist colony where his father is dying and gets ambushed by a posse of residents who press him to go native. " 'I'm really just here to be with my dad,' Harry explained. 'I don't really know if it's a nude kind of situation.' " For Stahl, of course, everything is a nude kind of situation. His stock in trade is a lyric perversity that seeks to undress our basest urges.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Joseph Lapin
Jerry Stahl believes it's impossible to shock an audience anymore, but in his new novel, "Happy Mutant Baby Pills" (Harper Perennial, $14.99 pp.), he comes close. His main character, Lloyd, falls in love with a murderous woman named Nora who wants to take down Monsanto and Dow Chemical. After an absurd, paranoid and somehow comic murder spree, they decide to create a mutant baby in protest of capitalism by ingesting as many prescriptions, GMOs and pesticide-laden products as possible - while shooting endless amounts of heroin.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2002 | Renee Tawa, Times Staff Writer
Put actor Ben Stiller on stage with his pal, the hilarious but dark Hollywood writer Jerry Stahl, and the comedy ensues, the way it does in a buddy picture where the biting humor undercuts the most piercing -- and revealing -- moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2004 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
Tipped toward the 10 o'clock hour, it's five deep at the bar. Drum-and-bass tracks skulk out over the stereo. Skin and gin flow through freely, the proceedings all cordoned off by the requisite stone-faced bouncer. Just another Thursday night in Hollywood, some would say. Not so for Jerry Stahl -- or rather, not so anymore.
BOOKS
April 23, 1995 | Bruce Wagner, Bruce Wagner wrote TV's "Wild Palms" and the upcoming "White Dwarf," from Fox. He also wrote the novel "Force Majeure," and his next book, "I'm Losing You" is due from Random House in the spring
If you wanted to make it in television, I sensed, you'd just have to roll up your sleeves. --from "Permanent Midnight: A Memoir" Jerry Stahl looms--floats--Bogosian-like (Seinfeldesque?), over the title of this coruscating, crazy-lantern, hellza(skin)poppin' memoir of a skeevy, sweet-souled dope fiend who just happened to be a TV hack. Along the bleachy brick road, Stahl reveals a hophead's lesser vanity--he has lousy teeth. Maybe he's exaggerating.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been more than a year since Jerry Stahl last forced heroin into his veins. But the former $5,000-a-week television writer, who once put words in the mouths of Hope, Michael and the rest of the yuppie crew from "thirtysomething," still sees Los Angeles through a junkie's eyes. The reminders are everywhere. Every day, when Stahl goes to Echo Park to pick up his 6-year-old daughter at school, he passes a corner where he used to buy drugs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
It was a lopsided victory of winks over smirks at "With a Wink and a Smirk," a Saturday afternoon panel discussion at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books that featured comic novelists Diana Wagman, Jerry Stahl, Mark Haskell Smith and Jim Magnuson and was moderated by David Kipen. That revelation, though, didn't come until close to the end of a free-wheeling, fast-moving and very humorous chat that included each author reading just the very first page (no more, no less) from one of his or her recently published books, and touched on taboo humor topics and the source of humor in the comic novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2009 | Tod Goldberg, Goldberg's books include "Living Dead Girl," "Fake Liar Cheat" and "Simplify."
It's rarely wise to compare someone to a legend. Inevitably, somebody is going to question the math. Yet as you read the first 200 pages of "Pain Killers," Jerry Stahl's second novel to follow the adventures of Manny Rupert -- a private eye with a drug problem -- it's difficult not to conjure up the work of the late Gregory Mcdonald and his creation Irwin "Fletch" Fletcher.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2009 | Tod Goldberg, Goldberg's books include "Living Dead Girl," "Fake Liar Cheat" and "Simplify."
It's rarely wise to compare someone to a legend. Inevitably, somebody is going to question the math. Yet as you read the first 200 pages of "Pain Killers," Jerry Stahl's second novel to follow the adventures of Manny Rupert -- a private eye with a drug problem -- it's difficult not to conjure up the work of the late Gregory Mcdonald and his creation Irwin "Fletch" Fletcher.
BOOKS
July 1, 2007 | Steve Almond, Steve Almond's new collection of essays, "Not That You Asked," will be published in September.
THERE'S a wonderful moment in Jerry Stahl's new story collection, "Love Without," in which a beleaguered son arrives at the nudist colony where his father is dying and gets ambushed by a posse of residents who press him to go native. " 'I'm really just here to be with my dad,' Harry explained. 'I don't really know if it's a nude kind of situation.' " For Stahl, of course, everything is a nude kind of situation. His stock in trade is a lyric perversity that seeks to undress our basest urges.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2004 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
Tipped toward the 10 o'clock hour, it's five deep at the bar. Drum-and-bass tracks skulk out over the stereo. Skin and gin flow through freely, the proceedings all cordoned off by the requisite stone-faced bouncer. Just another Thursday night in Hollywood, some would say. Not so for Jerry Stahl -- or rather, not so anymore.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2002 | Renee Tawa, Times Staff Writer
Put actor Ben Stiller on stage with his pal, the hilarious but dark Hollywood writer Jerry Stahl, and the comedy ensues, the way it does in a buddy picture where the biting humor undercuts the most piercing -- and revealing -- moments.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been more than a year since Jerry Stahl last forced heroin into his veins. But the former $5,000-a-week television writer, who once put words in the mouths of Hope, Michael and the rest of the yuppie crew from "thirtysomething," still sees Los Angeles through a junkie's eyes. The reminders are everywhere. Every day, when Stahl goes to Echo Park to pick up his 6-year-old daughter at school, he passes a corner where he used to buy drugs.
BOOKS
April 23, 1995 | Bruce Wagner, Bruce Wagner wrote TV's "Wild Palms" and the upcoming "White Dwarf," from Fox. He also wrote the novel "Force Majeure," and his next book, "I'm Losing You" is due from Random House in the spring
If you wanted to make it in television, I sensed, you'd just have to roll up your sleeves. --from "Permanent Midnight: A Memoir" Jerry Stahl looms--floats--Bogosian-like (Seinfeldesque?), over the title of this coruscating, crazy-lantern, hellza(skin)poppin' memoir of a skeevy, sweet-souled dope fiend who just happened to be a TV hack. Along the bleachy brick road, Stahl reveals a hophead's lesser vanity--he has lousy teeth. Maybe he's exaggerating.
BOOKS
June 18, 1995
It was generous--give-away-the-store-like--of Book Review to let massah Bruce Wagner show off all his skeevy new words in his review of the Jerry Stahl book, "Permanent Midnight" (Book Review, April 23). And even nicer of the paper to let young Wagner zorro its pages with free samples (favella-morphs?) of his fuhcocktuh juvenile style. But Brucie baby, where was the book review part? I mean, look Ace, write another one fast. Make it about the book this time--don't be so self-conscious.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2012
CONCERT Grimes Echo, 1822 W. Sunset Blvd. 8:30 p.m. Friday. $12. Attheecho.com BAR CRAWL Naughtical by Nature Bars on Main St. in Santa Monica 5:30 p.m. Saturday. $5. (213)373-1439 ART OPENINGS Blum & Poe and other galleries 2727 S. La Cienega Blvd. 6-8 p.m. Saturday. (310)836-2062 BRAZILIAN CARNAVAL Exotica Club Nokia, 800 W. Olympia Blvd. 8 p.m. Saturday. $45-$68. (213)765-7000 STORYTELLING The Moth with Jerry Stahl Royce Hall, 340 Royce Drive 8 p.m. Thursday.
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