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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2010
Q: Jerry Stiller appeared with what Oscar-winning actor in 1974's "The Taking of Pelham One Two Three" A: Walter Matthau
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2013 | Robert Lloyd, Television Critic
"Whoopi Goldberg Presents Moms Mabley," in which the former directs a film about the latter, premieres Monday on HBO. It is an homage and a celebration, with something of a high-class homemade feel. The first black female comic to make it in the American pop-cultural mainstream - the first black female stand-up comic, possibly - Jackie "Moms" Mabley will be unknown to many today. She died in 1975, after a career that began before the First World War but was visible only to the white audience from the 1960s, when she began appearing on network variety and talk shows.
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NEWS
November 22, 2001
Morty Fineman is a filmmaker extraordinaire: writer, director and producer of 427 films, including such classics as "Free Love for Sale," "Meter Reader Lolita" and "Cheerleader Camp Massacre." On Tuesday, he called from New York to chat about a new documentary being made to honor his life and work. It's about time, he said. "I made movies that grabbed people's consciousness," said Fineman, speaking through Jerry Stiller, who plays the fictional director in the new mockumentary "The Independent."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
The American Cinematheque celebrated the career of Ben Stiller on Thursday night, presenting the man that Eugene Levy called the "ultimate hyphenate" its 26th American Cinematheque award in an evening long on laughs and clips packages. "It's nice to get an award for nothing specific," Stiller said at the end of the ceremony, held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. "It's like there's no single one thing you did, but when you add it all up, there's something there. " That cumulative something was feted by the likes of Will Ferrell, Jack Black, Jeffrey Katzenberg and Jennifer Aniston, each of whom introduced footage focusing on a specific aspect of Stiller's career.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1987 | CLARKE TAYLOR
Jerry Stiller was sounding serious for a change. "It can be a painful process to discover who you really are, but only when you do will you start doing the kind of work that people pay attention to," he said. Stiller was reflecting on the lessons he said he learned from his latest role, in the TV adaptation of Saul Bellow's novel "Seize the Day." It airs on PBS' "Great Performances" Friday (8 p.m. Channel 24; 9 p.m. Channels 28 and 15).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1994 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jerry Stiller is half of the enduring comedy team of Stiller and Meara , with wife Anne. He's also the father of Ben Stiller, creator of the Emmy Award-winning "Ben Stiller Show" and director of the recent film "Reality Bites . " (Amy--Jerry and Anne's other child--plays a phone psychic in the movie.) These days, however, he's best known as Frank Costanza, the excitable, TV Guide-collecting father of the hapless, womanizing George on "Seinfeld."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2010 | Susan King
The comedy of Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara was born out of loving differences. Married in 1953, they became one of the most successful comedy teams around by joking about their respective ethnic groups (Jewish and Irish Catholic). They recorded comedy albums, played nightclubs and Las Vegas and were mainstays of variety hours on TV; in the 1960s, they were on "The Ed Sullivan Show" three dozen times. But with the demise of musical variety shows and Meara's reluctance to go on the road, they decided to split up the act. Stiller, 83, went on to even greater fame as a sitcom dad on "Seinfeld" and "The King of Queens" while appearing with his movie star son Ben in many films.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | TONY PEYSER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two of the most memorable pop culture catch phrases are "a really big show," courtesy of "The Ed Sullivan Show," and "Serenity now!" courtesy of "Seinfeld." Although these programs are separated by decades, one performer was on both of these landmark series and spoke (no, make that "bellowed") the last line: another Jerry, named Stiller. And we're not talking about just a couple of appearances, either.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2007 | Susan King
Jerry Stiller has nearly cornered the market on playing outrageous fathers -- first as George Costanza's blustery pop, Frank, on "Seinfeld" from 1993 to 1998, then as Arthur Spooner, the equally eccentric dad of Carrie on the CBS comedy series "The King of Queens," from 1998 until this year. But Frank and Arthur don't hold a candle to Stiller's latest patriarch, Doc, in Bobby and Peter Farrelly's comedy "The Heartbreak Kid," which opens Friday.
SPORTS
January 5, 1997 | JOE GERGEN, NEWSDAY
Considering the manner in which 1996 ended, with the reputation of the defending NFL champion Dallas Cowboys dragged once more through the mud, there was cause to believe the entire year was an illusion. More often than not, as with the sight of Muhammad Ali lighting the flame atop the Olympic Stadium in Atlanta, sports rose above the muck. Michael Johnson got his double, New York staged a glorious parade for the Yankees and Evander Holyfield slew his dragon.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2010
Q: Jerry Stiller appeared with what Oscar-winning actor in 1974's "The Taking of Pelham One Two Three" A: Walter Matthau
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Father and Son The popular actor/director Ben Stiller and his father have appeared together in such films as "Zoolander" and in the ill-fated 2007 remake of "The Heartbreak Kid"-as you guess it-father and son.' Sitcom Dad Jerry Stiller has also gone solo in films and television including playing Frank, the loud-mouth father of George Costanza on "Seinfeld" from 1993-98 and as Carrie's eccentric dad Arthur Spooner on the 1998-2007...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2010 | Susan King
The comedy of Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara was born out of loving differences. Married in 1953, they became one of the most successful comedy teams around by joking about their respective ethnic groups (Jewish and Irish Catholic). They recorded comedy albums, played nightclubs and Las Vegas and were mainstays of variety hours on TV; in the 1960s, they were on "The Ed Sullivan Show" three dozen times. But with the demise of musical variety shows and Meara's reluctance to go on the road, they decided to split up the act. Stiller, 83, went on to even greater fame as a sitcom dad on "Seinfeld" and "The King of Queens" while appearing with his movie star son Ben in many films.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2007 | Susan King
Jerry Stiller has nearly cornered the market on playing outrageous fathers -- first as George Costanza's blustery pop, Frank, on "Seinfeld" from 1993 to 1998, then as Arthur Spooner, the equally eccentric dad of Carrie on the CBS comedy series "The King of Queens," from 1998 until this year. But Frank and Arthur don't hold a candle to Stiller's latest patriarch, Doc, in Bobby and Peter Farrelly's comedy "The Heartbreak Kid," which opens Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Everyone has their favorite Morty Fineman film. When you write and direct 427 features, there's a lot to choose from. Who can forget "Twelve Angry Men and a Baby," not to mention "Chicks With Hicks," "Cage Full of Waitresses," "King Kong Christmas" and the one-of-a-kind "Christ for the Defense," in which Jesus returns to Earth and short-circuits personal injury lawsuits by healing victims right in the courtroom? Now that's entertainment.
NEWS
November 22, 2001
Morty Fineman is a filmmaker extraordinaire: writer, director and producer of 427 films, including such classics as "Free Love for Sale," "Meter Reader Lolita" and "Cheerleader Camp Massacre." On Tuesday, he called from New York to chat about a new documentary being made to honor his life and work. It's about time, he said. "I made movies that grabbed people's consciousness," said Fineman, speaking through Jerry Stiller, who plays the fictional director in the new mockumentary "The Independent."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2013 | Robert Lloyd, Television Critic
"Whoopi Goldberg Presents Moms Mabley," in which the former directs a film about the latter, premieres Monday on HBO. It is an homage and a celebration, with something of a high-class homemade feel. The first black female comic to make it in the American pop-cultural mainstream - the first black female stand-up comic, possibly - Jackie "Moms" Mabley will be unknown to many today. She died in 1975, after a career that began before the First World War but was visible only to the white audience from the 1960s, when she began appearing on network variety and talk shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
The American Cinematheque celebrated the career of Ben Stiller on Thursday night, presenting the man that Eugene Levy called the "ultimate hyphenate" its 26th American Cinematheque award in an evening long on laughs and clips packages. "It's nice to get an award for nothing specific," Stiller said at the end of the ceremony, held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. "It's like there's no single one thing you did, but when you add it all up, there's something there. " That cumulative something was feted by the likes of Will Ferrell, Jack Black, Jeffrey Katzenberg and Jennifer Aniston, each of whom introduced footage focusing on a specific aspect of Stiller's career.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | TONY PEYSER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two of the most memorable pop culture catch phrases are "a really big show," courtesy of "The Ed Sullivan Show," and "Serenity now!" courtesy of "Seinfeld." Although these programs are separated by decades, one performer was on both of these landmark series and spoke (no, make that "bellowed") the last line: another Jerry, named Stiller. And we're not talking about just a couple of appearances, either.
SPORTS
January 5, 1997 | JOE GERGEN, NEWSDAY
Considering the manner in which 1996 ended, with the reputation of the defending NFL champion Dallas Cowboys dragged once more through the mud, there was cause to believe the entire year was an illusion. More often than not, as with the sight of Muhammad Ali lighting the flame atop the Olympic Stadium in Atlanta, sports rose above the muck. Michael Johnson got his double, New York staged a glorious parade for the Yankees and Evander Holyfield slew his dragon.
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