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June 22, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
As expected, two dissident leaders fighting for top union offices in the United Auto Workers were soundly defeated Wednesday at the UAW's national convention. At the same time, UAW President Owen Bieber was reelected by acclamation to his third three-year term at the helm of the 1-million member industrial union. The 59-year-old Bieber, who succeeded former President Douglas Fraser in 1983, ran unopposed for reelection. The rest of the leadership's slate, which included Secretary-Treasurer Bill Casstevens, the second most powerful official in the union, and four vice presidents, also was elected.
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BUSINESS
June 18, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bieber Reelected UAW Chief: Owen Bieber was easily reelected president of the United Auto Workers at the union's convention in San Diego, but supporters of dissident Jerry Tucker dragged out the process, forcing the first roll-call vote in 20 years. Despite Tucker's support among dissident delegates, however, Bieber won his fourth three-year term as head of the 860,000-member union. Western Region 6 Director Bruce Lee was reelected by 222 votes to dissident opponent Glenn Plunkett's 198.
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BUSINESS
June 21, 1989 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer and
It was one part revival meeting, one part testimonial and one part pep talk in the smoke-choked ballroom of the Jolly Roger Inn. The dissident faction of the United Auto Workers had gathered Tuesday morning at the hotel, next door to the Anaheim Convention Center, to plot strategy after two days of stinging defeat, and it needed to get some momentum rolling. For the union's New Directions faction, the Jolly Roger Inn was the place to be. On the floor of the UAW's national convention, the dissidents feel isolated, dispersed and out-shouted.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Dissident members of the United Auto Workers union said Thursday that, as expected, they will set up a formal, national organization to fight further ties between the union and U.S. auto makers. Jerry Tucker, a leader of the so-called New Directions dissident movement, said the group will proceed with plans to form an organization within the union that will have its own staff and charge dues. Tucker, who lost his bid for reelection as a regional director to of the UAW at this week's UAW convention at the Anaheim Convention Center, is expected to be named the group's director.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bieber Reelected UAW Chief: Owen Bieber was easily reelected president of the United Auto Workers at the union's convention in San Diego, but supporters of dissident Jerry Tucker dragged out the process, forcing the first roll-call vote in 20 years. Despite Tucker's support among dissident delegates, however, Bieber won his fourth three-year term as head of the 860,000-member union. Western Region 6 Director Bruce Lee was reelected by 222 votes to dissident opponent Glenn Plunkett's 198.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Dissident members of the United Auto Workers union said Thursday that, as expected, they will set up a formal, national organization to fight further ties between the union and U.S. auto makers. Jerry Tucker, a leader of the so-called New Directions dissident movement, said the group will proceed with plans to form an organization within the union that will have its own staff and charge dues. Tucker, who lost his bid for reelection as a regional director to of the UAW at this week's UAW convention at the Anaheim Convention Center, is expected to be named the group's director.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1986 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
The United Auto Workers certified the controversial reelection of Ken Worley as director of its largest region Friday, the final day of its constitutional convention in Anaheim. Worley narrowly defeated challenger Jerry Tucker by one-tenth of a vote Wednesday for the directorship of Region 5, which covers eight states stretching from Colorado to Louisiana. Regional directors serve on the union's international executive board.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Jerry Tucker, a veteran union activist who has become a symbol of discontent within the United Auto Workers, was elected to the UAW's executive board Friday in Tulsa, Oklahoma, culminating a 27-month struggle that badly embarrassed the UAW leadership. Tucker, 49, was elected director of the union's eight-state, 80,000-member Region 5 at a special election held under the auspices of the Labor Department.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
A dissident movement inside the United Auto Workers union, seeking to curb labor-management cooperation in the auto industry, has suffered a series of political setbacks in local union elections in recent days, the group acknowledged Tuesday. But the dissidents charge that the UAW leadership has engaged in widespread election fraud and say they plan to appeal the results, both at the union's national convention in Anaheim in June and in the courts. UAW officials deny the charges, but admit that the bitter election campaign may lead to a serious rift within the nation's most influential industrial union.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
A loose-knit group of dissidents within the United Auto Workers, angered by the union's increasing cooperation with auto industry management, is considering forming an organized opposition union caucus that would operate independently of the UAW's current hierarchy. The dissident group, called New Directions, may use the union's national convention beginning Sunday at the Anaheim Convention Center as the forum for announcing a more structured opposition inside the UAW--an organization that would have its own staff and even collect dues from willing members.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
As expected, two dissident leaders fighting for top union offices in the United Auto Workers were soundly defeated Wednesday at the UAW's national convention. At the same time, UAW President Owen Bieber was reelected by acclamation to his third three-year term at the helm of the 1-million member industrial union. The 59-year-old Bieber, who succeeded former President Douglas Fraser in 1983, ran unopposed for reelection. The rest of the leadership's slate, which included Secretary-Treasurer Bill Casstevens, the second most powerful official in the union, and four vice presidents, also was elected.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1989 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer and
It was one part revival meeting, one part testimonial and one part pep talk in the smoke-choked ballroom of the Jolly Roger Inn. The dissident faction of the United Auto Workers had gathered Tuesday morning at the hotel, next door to the Anaheim Convention Center, to plot strategy after two days of stinging defeat, and it needed to get some momentum rolling. For the union's New Directions faction, the Jolly Roger Inn was the place to be. On the floor of the UAW's national convention, the dissidents feel isolated, dispersed and out-shouted.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
A loose-knit group of dissidents within the United Auto Workers, angered by the union's increasing cooperation with auto industry management, is considering forming an organized opposition union caucus that would operate independently of the UAW's current hierarchy. The dissident group, called New Directions, may use the union's national convention beginning Sunday at the Anaheim Convention Center as the forum for announcing a more structured opposition inside the UAW--an organization that would have its own staff and even collect dues from willing members.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
A dissident movement inside the United Auto Workers union, seeking to curb labor-management cooperation in the auto industry, has suffered a series of political setbacks in local union elections in recent days, the group acknowledged Tuesday. But the dissidents charge that the UAW leadership has engaged in widespread election fraud and say they plan to appeal the results, both at the union's national convention in Anaheim in June and in the courts. UAW officials deny the charges, but admit that the bitter election campaign may lead to a serious rift within the nation's most influential industrial union.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Jerry Tucker, a veteran union activist who has become a symbol of discontent within the United Auto Workers, was elected to the UAW's executive board Friday in Tulsa, Oklahoma, culminating a 27-month struggle that badly embarrassed the UAW leadership. Tucker, 49, was elected director of the union's eight-state, 80,000-member Region 5 at a special election held under the auspices of the Labor Department.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1986 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
The United Auto Workers certified the controversial reelection of Ken Worley as director of its largest region Friday, the final day of its constitutional convention in Anaheim. Worley narrowly defeated challenger Jerry Tucker by one-tenth of a vote Wednesday for the directorship of Region 5, which covers eight states stretching from Colorado to Louisiana. Regional directors serve on the union's international executive board.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1986 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Carroll Butler, a veteran aerospace worker from Grand Prairie, Tex., considers the United Auto Workers "the greatest union in the country" and has been a staunch supporter of virtually all of its principal leaders for the 26 years that he has been a member. But this year, Butler and a number of his Southwestern colleagues decided to buck the UAW administration in hopes of making a first step in changing the union's course.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1986 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Carroll Butler, a veteran aerospace worker from Grand Prairie, Tex., considers the United Auto Workers "the greatest union in the country" and has been a staunch supporter of virtually all of its principal leaders for the 26 years that he has been a member. But this year, Butler and a number of his Southwestern colleagues decided to buck the UAW administration in hopes of making a first step in changing the union's course.
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