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Jerry Whitworth

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NEWS
June 9, 1985 | NANCY SKELTON, Times Staff Writer
From his youth, accused spy Jerry Alfred Whitworth was always hiding something from those who thought they knew him best. He was named class comedian of his high school because he was "always so happy-go-lucky, making everybody laugh." Hidden from his classmates was the pain of a tumultuous home life. To his wife, he was a pillar of strength, a man with "a very confident manner" who had "seen the world and met people from different cultures."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1993 | Associated Press
The items range from a high-tech walkie-talkie with a warranty personally signed by convicted spy Jerry Whitworth to rare coins and original artwork. The Internal Revenue Service is offering those goods and other trappings Whitworth amassed to the highest bidder on Friday. The intent of the auction is to pay off a whopping tax bill Whitworth accumulated during 10 years selling military secrets to the former Soviet Union in what has been called the most damaging espionage case in U.S. history.
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NEWS
June 18, 1986 | Associated Press
The defense in the trial of Jerry Whitworth, accused of selling Navy code secrets to a Soviet-controlled spy ring, will rest its case Thursday without calling Whitworth to the stand, a defense lawyer said today. Attorney James Larson told reporters that Whitworth will not testify because he has no defense to charges of income tax evasion, which are being tried together with the espionage charges.
SPORTS
December 10, 1988
I can't believe it. The Clippers beat the Bulls and Nets, looking very good doing it, and end up on the fourth page of The Times sports section. Then they go to Sacramento and get their brains beat out, and they make the front page. The Clipper kids deserve better than this. JERRY WHITWORTH Mission Viejo
NEWS
June 20, 1986
The defense rested in the San Francisco espionage trial of former Navy radioman Jerry Whitworth after more than a dozen friends, relatives and other witnesses testified about his loyalty. Whitworth, 46, accused of selling highly secret cryptographic material to the Soviet Union through confessed spy John A. Walker, did not testify.
SPORTS
December 10, 1988
I can't believe it. The Clippers beat the Bulls and Nets, looking very good doing it, and end up on the fourth page of The Times sports section. Then they go to Sacramento and get their brains beat out, and they make the front page. The Clipper kids deserve better than this. JERRY WHITWORTH Mission Viejo
NEWS
December 12, 1985 | Associated Press
Former Navy radio man Jerry Whitworth, the last remaining defendant in the John Walker spy ring case, pleaded innocent today to new charges of selling military code secrets to the Soviet Union for $332,000. Whitworth, 46, of Davis, was indicted Tuesday by a federal grand jury that reportedly heard testimony last week from Walker, a confessed spy and leader of an organization that sold secret information to the Soviet Union. Whitworth's trial is scheduled Jan. 13. He is being held without bail.
NEWS
July 11, 1986 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Accused spy Jerry A. Whitworth wrote four anonymous letters to the FBI in 1984 admitting his involvement in espionage and offering to expose it in return for immunity from prosecution, Whitworth's lawyer said Thursday. "I will not quibble with you. . . . The writer of the 'RUS' letters was Jerry Whitworth," defense lawyer James Larson told jurors, referring to four letters signed, "RUS, Somewhere USA," that were mailed to the FBI in San Francisco between May and August, 1984.
NEWS
July 19, 1986 | United Press International
Jurors in the espionage trial of Jerry Whitworth completed a sixth day of deliberations Friday without deciding whether he knowingly sold top secret Navy radio codes to the Soviet Union. The jury is to resume deliberations Monday morning. Whitworth, 46, of Davis, Calif., is accused of selling classified Navy codes for nearly a decade to the Soviet Union through convicted spy John Walker, who served as a go-between. Whitworth was paid $332,000 between 1974 and 1983 for the information.
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
A federal judge, rejecting Jerry Whitworth's pleas for mercy, sentenced the retired Navy chief radioman to 365 years in federal prison today for selling highly sensitive code secrets to a Soviet spy ring led by former shipmate John Walker. Whitworth, convicted on seven counts of espionage, must serve at least 60 years before he will be eligible for parole. The former Navy radioman, called by the government the central figure in the most damaging spy ring in U.S.
NEWS
September 2, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Concurring with a judge who called him "one of the most spectacular spies of this century," a federal appeals court Thursday upheld the espionage conviction of Jerry Whitworth, a Navy radioman who fed secret communications data to the Soviets for nearly 10 years as part of the Walker family spy ring. In a 3-0 decision, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals also upheld Whitworth's 365-year sentence under which he does not become eligible for parole for 60 years.
NEWS
August 29, 1986 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Calling Jerry A. Whitworth "one of the most spectacular spies of this century," a federal judge Thursday sentenced the former U.S. Navy communication specialist to 365 years in prison and fined him $410,000. U.S. District Judge John P. Vukasin also ordered that Whitworth, 47, who stole Navy coding secrets for sale to the Soviet Union, serve 60 years in prison before becoming eligible for parole. It is by far the heaviest sentence imposed on any member of the Soviet spy ring headed by John A.
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
A federal judge, rejecting Jerry Whitworth's pleas for mercy, sentenced the retired Navy chief radioman to 365 years in federal prison today for selling highly sensitive code secrets to a Soviet spy ring led by former shipmate John Walker. Whitworth, convicted on seven counts of espionage, must serve at least 60 years before he will be eligible for parole. The former Navy radioman, called by the government the central figure in the most damaging spy ring in U.S.
NEWS
July 19, 1986 | United Press International
Jurors in the espionage trial of Jerry Whitworth completed a sixth day of deliberations Friday without deciding whether he knowingly sold top secret Navy radio codes to the Soviet Union. The jury is to resume deliberations Monday morning. Whitworth, 46, of Davis, Calif., is accused of selling classified Navy codes for nearly a decade to the Soviet Union through convicted spy John Walker, who served as a go-between. Whitworth was paid $332,000 between 1974 and 1983 for the information.
NEWS
July 11, 1986 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Accused spy Jerry A. Whitworth wrote four anonymous letters to the FBI in 1984 admitting his involvement in espionage and offering to expose it in return for immunity from prosecution, Whitworth's lawyer said Thursday. "I will not quibble with you. . . . The writer of the 'RUS' letters was Jerry Whitworth," defense lawyer James Larson told jurors, referring to four letters signed, "RUS, Somewhere USA," that were mailed to the FBI in San Francisco between May and August, 1984.
NEWS
July 9, 1986 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
A federal prosecutor, holding up top-secret naval coding material, told jurors Tuesday that Jerry A. Whitworth had to know he was working for the Soviets when he stole the highly sensitive information. Assistant U.S. Atty Leida Schoggen began the prosecution's closing argument by countering the defense claim made during the trial that Whitworth, the former Navy communications specialist, would never have knowingly helped the Soviet Union.
NEWS
June 10, 1986 | Associated Press
The jury in the Jerry Whitworth spy trial heard some of the prosecution's most potentially damaging and risky evidence Monday, anonymous letters to the FBI that the government says were written by Whitworth and confessed involvement in espionage for the Soviet Union. The letters, received between May and August, 1984, and signed RUS, were admitted into evidence by U.S.
NEWS
July 3, 1986 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Prosecutors must prove Jerry Whitworth knowingly spied for the Soviet Union before he can be convicted of espionage, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday in a major victory for the defense. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals declined to interfere with the decision of Judge John P. Vukasin to instruct the trial jury that in order to bring in a verdict of guilty on espionage charges, it must find that Whitworth knew that the U.S. Navy secrets he allegedly stole were passed to the Soviets.
NEWS
June 27, 1986 | United Press International
A federal prosecutor asked a judge Thursday to reconsider a crucial ruling in favor of accused spy Jerry Whitworth, saying he feared that it created a "significantly greater chance of acquittal." Assistant U.S. Atty. William (Buck) Farmer said he would seek an immediate, emergency appeal to the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals if U.S. District Judge John P. Vukasin does not reverse himself. An appeal would halt the trial until the issue is resolved.
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