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Jerry Zweig

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NEWS
July 25, 1991 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a matter of weeks, this historic gold-mining town will usher in something few of its 1,300 residents seem to want: Fast food. And it will come, it appears, in exchange for something the town desperately needs: Water. Before long, two new franchises, Dairy Queen and Subway Sandwiches, will open in Julian, an apple-growing center nestled in the Cuyamaca Mountains about 65 miles northeast of San Diego.
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NEWS
July 25, 1991 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a matter of weeks, this historic gold-mining town will usher in something few of its 1,300 residents seem to want: Fast food. And it will come, it appears, in exchange for something the town desperately needs: Water. Before long, two new franchises, Dairy Queen and Subway Sandwiches, will open in Julian, an apple-growing center nestled in the Cuyamaca Mountains about 65 miles northeast of San Diego.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1991 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Kersten and Robert Henie showed up in the historic gold-mining town of Julian expecting the worst. As the owners of Julian's first-ever fast-food franchises, they feared being labeled greedy invaders in a picturesque mountain town that prizes its quaintness and charm and is to apples what Milwaukee is to beer. In fact, until last month--until Kersten and Henie came to town--Julian had staved off even the rumor of fast food.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Kersten and Robert Henie showed up in this historic San Diego County gold-mining town expecting the worst. As the owners of Julian's first-ever fast-food franchises, they feared being labeled greedy invaders in a picturesque mountain town that prizes its quaintness and charm and its annual apple festival. In fact, until last month--until Kersten and Henie came to town--Julian had staved off even the rumor of fast food.
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a matter of weeks, this historic gold-mining town will usher in something few of its 1,300 residents seem to want: Fast food. And it will come in exchange for something the town desperately needs: Water. Before long, two new franchises, Dairy Queen and Subway Sandwiches, will open in Julian, the apple-growing center nestled in the Cuyamaca Mountains.
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