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May 25, 2003 | Bob Mieszerski
There was a surprise name among the eight entries for Monday's $100,000 Jersey Derby at Monmouth Park. Bobby Frankel, who has been unable to train Empire Maker to his satisfaction because of the recent surge of wet weather in New York, said he may run the beaten Kentucky Derby favorite at Monmouth to prepare the colt for the Belmont Stakes on June 7. "As of now, I'm running," Frankel told the Blood Horse. "I have until Monday to make up my mind.
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SPORTS
May 25, 2003 | Bob Mieszerski
There was a surprise name among the eight entries for Monday's $100,000 Jersey Derby at Monmouth Park. Bobby Frankel, who has been unable to train Empire Maker to his satisfaction because of the recent surge of wet weather in New York, said he may run the beaten Kentucky Derby favorite at Monmouth to prepare the colt for the Belmont Stakes on June 7. "As of now, I'm running," Frankel told the Blood Horse. "I have until Monday to make up my mind.
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SPORTS
May 27, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
The only time Laffit Pincay ever rode in the Jersey Derby, he finished fifth on Judger, the odds-on favorite, as a long shot named Better Arbitor won the race in 1974. Judger went off at 9-to-10 odds, a comparative long shot when compared to Spend a Buck, Pincay's mount in the $1-million Jersey Derby at Garden State Park today.
SPORTS
May 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
Awe Inspiring earned a start in the Belmont Stakes and another shot at Sunday Silence by winning the $500,000 Jersey Derby by 3 1/4 lengths Monday. "We'll certainly be there if he is right for it, and I hope he will be," owner Ogden Mills Phipps said after Awe Inspiring covered the 1 1/4 miles at Garden State in 2 minutes 3 seconds. Phipps said he would discuss Awe Inspiring's status with trainer Shug McGaughey today. Awe Inspiring finished third in the Kentucky Derby, a little more than 2 1/2 lengths behind winner Sunday Silence and only a head behind stablemate Easy Goer.
SPORTS
May 26, 1986 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Bob Brennan's targets haven't changed, and neither has his approach. For the Securities and Exchange Commission, which has made life uncomfortable for Brennan for more than 10 years, he serves up unabashed sarcasm. For the race tracks that run the Triple Crown, Brennan offers what he thinks is a better idea. It is Brennan who makes Churchill Downs, Pimlico and Belmont Park feel uncomfortable.
SPORTS
May 31, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Dynaformer closed along the rail and edged entrymate Tsarbaby by a half-length Monday to win the $500,000 Jersey Derby at Garden State Park in Cherry Hill, N.J., and give trainer Wayne Lukas a victory over rival Woody Stephens. Dynaformer covered the 1 miles in 2:02 4/5 to earn the $300,000 first prize in the Grade II stakes. Craig Perret drew Dynaformer even with Tsarbaby at the final turn and outdueled jockey Herb McCauley and Tsarbaby.
SPORTS
May 22, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Angel Cordero told trainer Cam Gambolati Tuesday that he won't be able to ride heavily favored Spend a Buck in the Jersey Derby next Monday at Garden State Park, creating a possible $260,000 payday for Laffit Pincay, who will replace Cordero on the Kentucky Derby winner. If Spend a Buck wins the Jersey Derby, he will earn a $2 million bonus and $600,000 as the winner's share of the purse.
SPORTS
May 8, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Call it the Triple Frown. Because frowning is what racing officials at the Triple Crown tracks--Churchill Downs, Pimlico and Belmont Park--were doing Tuesday after Dennis Diaz, owner of Kentucky Derby winner Spend A Buck, announced that his colt would run in the Jersey Derby at Garden State Park May 27 instead of the Preakness at Pimlico May 18.
SPORTS
May 28, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Spend a Buck carried Laffit Pincay across the finish line and $2.6 million to the vault in a little more than two minutes Monday, but trainer Cam Gambolati's heart was in his shoe by the time the brilliant 3-year-old got to the wire first in the Jersey Derby.
SPORTS
May 31, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Dynaformer closed along the rail and edged entrymate Tsarbaby by a half-length Monday to win the $500,000 Jersey Derby at Garden State Park in Cherry Hill, N.J., and give trainer Wayne Lukas a victory over rival Woody Stephens. Dynaformer covered the 1 miles in 2:02 4/5 to earn the $300,000 first prize in the Grade II stakes. Craig Perret drew Dynaformer even with Tsarbaby at the final turn and outdueled jockey Herb McCauley and Tsarbaby.
SPORTS
October 7, 1986
The presenters of the Triple Crown, still stinging after losing Kentucky Derby winner Spend a Buck to the Jersey Derby in 1985, said Monday that they will take on their New Jersey rival in a battle of million-dollar purses. Triple Crown Productions announced the "Triple Crown Challenge," worth $5 million to the owner of any horse who sweeps the Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes and Belmont Stakes.
SPORTS
May 27, 1986 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Snow Chief's canter to a two-length win in Monday's Jersey Derby was no surprise. But when Carl Grinstead, the co-owner of the 3-year-old California-bred colt, started talking after the race about running in the Belmont Stakes 12 days from now, that startled a number of people and didn't exactly please Mel Stute, who trains the horse. Stute said after Snow Chief won the Preakness Stakes at Pimlico on May 17 that the 1 1/2-mile Belmont on June 7 in New York would dull the colt's speed.
SPORTS
May 26, 1986 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Bob Brennan's targets haven't changed, and neither has his approach. For the Securities and Exchange Commission, which has made life uncomfortable for Brennan for more than 10 years, he serves up unabashed sarcasm. For the race tracks that run the Triple Crown, Brennan offers what he thinks is a better idea. It is Brennan who makes Churchill Downs, Pimlico and Belmont Park feel uncomfortable.
SPORTS
May 25, 1986 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Monday's $1-million Jersey Derby will be Snow Chief's third tough race in 24 days, and comes only nine days after his win in the Preakness. Will Carl Grinstead, the co-owner of Snow Chief, please take the stand? "Before, we were being criticized for not running the horse enough," Grinstead said. "Now we're being criticized for running the horse too much. So what can you do?"
SPORTS
May 24, 1986 | BILL CHRISTINE
Snow Chief, the winner of the Preakness Stakes last Saturday, has been installed as the 7-5 favorite and will start from the No. 5 post position Monday in the $1-million Jersey Derby at Garden State Park. Only seven or eight horses had been expected to run, but 11 were entered. First place pays $600,000, with the next four positions being worth $200,000, $110,000, $60,000 and $30,000. Snow Chief's biggest challengers in the 1-mile race are Tasso, Fobby Forbes and Mogambo.
SPORTS
October 7, 1986
The presenters of the Triple Crown, still stinging after losing Kentucky Derby winner Spend a Buck to the Jersey Derby in 1985, said Monday that they will take on their New Jersey rival in a battle of million-dollar purses. Triple Crown Productions announced the "Triple Crown Challenge," worth $5 million to the owner of any horse who sweeps the Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes and Belmont Stakes.
SPORTS
May 7, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Dennis Diaz, Spend A Buck's owner, said Monday that the horse's health will be the main factor in determining whether the Kentucky Derby winner will try for a potential $2.6-million payday in the Jersey Derby or for a chance at winning the Triple Crown. Diaz expects to decide by Wednesday if he will enter Spend A Buck in the Preakness at Baltimore's Pimlico May 18, or the Jersey Derby at Garden State Park in Cherry Hill, N.J., May 27.
SPORTS
April 6, 1986 | ANDREW BEYER, The Washington Post
Cam Gambolati's life has returned to normal. The 36-year-old trainer makes few visits to the winner's circle. His name appears in no headlines. The thoroughbreds in his stable are, for the most part, "bad horses who can't run." There are countless trainers like Gambolati, and all of them share the same implausible dream: Finding a cheap horse blessed with exceptional talent who develops into a champion. But unlike most of his brethren, Gambolati doesn't have to fantasize.
SPORTS
June 2, 1985 | POHLA SMITH, United Press International
New York racing official Gerard McKeon thinks the Triple Crown series probably gained as much as it lost by Spend a Buck's controversial defection from the final two legs of the traditional test of 3-year-old thoroughbreds. The benefits are two-fold, says McKeon, president of the New York Racing Association, Inc.
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