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January 12, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Silverado Banking, Savings & Loan Assn. borrower Bill L. Walters denied accusations Friday during a federal hearing in Santa Ana that he deposited $20 million in a British offshore bank before filing for personal bankruptcy in November. Walters, a former Denver developer who defaulted on about $100 million in loans from the failed Denver thrift, called the accusations by a Denver socialite "false." Virginia Dalton, a Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.
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BUSINESS
January 12, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Silverado Banking, Savings & Loan borrower Bill L. Walters denied accusations Friday in a Santa Ana federal hearing that he deposited $20 million in a British offshore bank before filing for bankruptcy in November. Walters, a former Denver developer who defaulted on about $100 million in loans from the failed Denver thrift, called the accusations by a Denver socialite "false." Virginia Dalton, a Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.
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BUSINESS
January 12, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Silverado Banking, Savings & Loan borrower Bill L. Walters denied accusations Friday in a Santa Ana federal hearing that he deposited $20 million in a British offshore bank before filing for bankruptcy in November. Walters, a former Denver developer who defaulted on about $100 million in loans from the failed Denver thrift, called the accusations by a Denver socialite "false." Virginia Dalton, a Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Silverado Banking, Savings & Loan Assn. borrower Bill L. Walters denied accusations Friday during a federal hearing in Santa Ana that he deposited $20 million in a British offshore bank before filing for personal bankruptcy in November. Walters, a former Denver developer who defaulted on about $100 million in loans from the failed Denver thrift, called the accusations by a Denver socialite "false." Virginia Dalton, a Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.
OPINION
August 22, 2013 | By Michael D. Tanner
Contrary to stereotypes, there is no evidence that people on welfare are lazy. Indeed, surveys of welfare recipients consistently show their desire for a job. But there is also evidence that many are reluctant to accept available employment opportunities. Despite work requirements included in the 1996 welfare reform, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says less than 42% of adult welfare recipients participate in work activities nationwide. Why the contradiction? Perhaps it's because, while poor people are not lazy, they are not stupid either.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | By Lisa Zamosky
After finding a lump in her breast, Laura Wells had to wait nearly six months before getting a confirmed diagnosis of cancer. The 46-year-old Costa Mesa woman was uninsured and working part-time when she discovered the lump in 2007. She worked for months to scrape together enough cash, first to pay for an exam, then a mammogram, and finally to see a doctor who diagnosed her disease. She frantically searched for programs to help pay for the surgery and chemotherapy she needed, initially without much success.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
The 15th storm to pound the northeastern United States this winter dumped more than two feet of snow, snarled air and commuter traffic and cut off New Jersey island towns from the mainland Thursday. Heavy snow fell in New England and portions of northern New York and eastern Pennsylvania the day after the storm made its way up the Atlantic Coast. Burdett, N.Y., had 27 inches of snow on the ground Thursday, while Lock Haven and Lovelton in Pennsylvania each received 24 inches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
The Northeast and Midwest have the nation's highest death rates from heart disease while the West has the lowest, Centers for Disease Control officials said last week. The nation's worst rate is in New York, where in 1985 320 out of every 100,000 men died of ischemic heart disease, which involves blockage of the arteries. The national average was 249; in New Mexico, the rate was 151 per 100,000. The five worst states for men were New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Michigan and Ohio.
SPORTS
February 15, 1995 | ROSS NEWHAN
Officials of the United Baseball League, which will begin play in 1996 as an announced third major league, named its first six franchises Tuesday, with either Los Angeles or an Inland Empire location among them. Co-founder Bob Mrazek said he has had "very positive" discussions with Coliseum officials about putting a team there. Mrazek said that a choice between Los Angeles and either Riverside or San Bernardino would be made soon.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former developer who was an associate in failed Silverado Banking, Savings & Loan testified Tuesday that he was not guilty of hiding millions of dollars in assets when he declared bankruptcy almost two years ago. Bill L. Walters, once one of Denver's leading real estate developers, is charged with lying to federal officials when he told Congress in 1990 that he was broke. In a three-day trial in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Santa Ana, Walters is trying to persuade bankruptcy Judge John J.
NEWS
November 27, 1996
As the federal government prepares to tighten air pollution standards for the first time in a decade, here is a glance at how the Southland and other metropolitan areas match up to exiting standards: South Coast New York Chicago Houston Washington, D.C. **** The distance Americans traveled for personal business increased by 137% from 1969 to 1990, with smaller increases for shopping trips and work travel. Trips to work accounted for the most household travel in 1990.
OPINION
August 31, 1986 | Martin Gershman, Dr. Martin Gershman is a San Francisco pediatrician and a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
In most California school districts, the law allows teachers to hit their students. This holdover from our past would be abolished by a bill approved by both houses of the Legislature and now on Gov. George Deukmejian's desk for signature. During Colonial days, corporal punishment was a preferred method of handling school disciplinary problems, and teachers were expected to strike students regularly for any and all infractions.
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