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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2000
The recent trip of Pope John Paul II to the Holy Land reminds us that the Israelis and the Palestinians are still squabbling over Jerusalem, and it looks as if neither side is ever going to give. Given the international importance of Jerusalem, why not put this city and its environs under the governance of the U.N.? Neither the Palestinians nor the Israelis will be happy about this, but each will have the satisfaction of knowing that the other side is not happy either. This is better than having one side happy and the other not happy at all. JUANITA MATASSA Santa Ana
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WORLD
April 19, 2014 | By Maher Abukhater, This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details.
JERUSALEM - Thousands of people gathered at the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem's Old City on Saturday for the lighting of the “holy fire,” an annual ritual marking the Christian belief in the resurrection of Jesus Christ after his crucifixion. The Greek Orthodox patriarch of Jerusalem battled his way through crowds shortly after midday to enter the church's small chapel, where what is believed to be Jesus' tomb is located. Minutes later, the pilgrims inside the small basilica cheered as he emerged carrying two lit bundles of 33 candles each symbolizing the age of Jesus at the time of his death.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2012
Journalism Joe Sacco Metropolitan: 192 pp., $29   Jerusalem Chronicles from the Holy City Guy Delisle Drawn & Quarterly: 336 pp., $24.95
WORLD
April 18, 2014 | By Maher Abukhater
JERUSALEM - Thousands of Christian pilgrims from all over the world filled the narrow streets of the Old City of Jerusalem on Good Friday to celebrate on the site they believe Jesus was crucified and buried over 2,000 years ago. The pilgrims gathered near the fourth station on Via Dolorosa, the street down which Jesus is believed to have walked on the way to his Crucifixion. Then they followed his path through that narrow alley toward the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, where they believe Jesus was crucified and buried.
OPINION
July 28, 2013
Re "U.S. 'neutrality' on Jerusalem," Editorial, July 25 What would we think if Spain or any other country decided that Puerto Rico was not really U.S. territory? Suppose it refused to accept U.S. passports issued to residents of San Juan. Wouldn't that be considered an intrusion? So how can our government tell residents of Jerusalem what country they live in? Marshall Giller Northridge ALSO: Letters: Kaiser's premium push Letters: Immigration issue takes off Letters: Sick over DWP's pay policies
OPINION
January 8, 2013
Re "Talking to a wall, connecting with God," Opinion, Jan. 4 Reform Rabbi Ben Kamin may imagine that the "stern, bearded men" he sees at the Western Wall in Jerusalem are "scolding" him "with their fierce eyes" for not wearing a skullcap, but even his imagination should not twist the facts. Rabbi Kamin's female relatives are, despite what he seems to imply, not barred from praying at the site. Yes, the area of the wall plaza is segregated by sex, befitting a place that is the remnant of the courtyard of a temple where such separation was instituted to ensure a feeling of solemnity and holiness for worshipers.
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Michael McGough
This is a revised version of the original post; see the note below. Except for the editorial page of the New York Times, which gushed about its provisions and criticized President Obama for not giving louder voice to them, the 2012 Democratic platform hasn't gotten a lot of attention. But suddenly "Moving America Forward" was big news, not because of what it contained but because of what was missing. The Republican ticket professed dismay about two omissions: the lack of any reference to God, and the disappearance of a provision from the 2008 Democratic platform declaring that "Jerusalem is and will remain the capital of Israel.
WORLD
April 14, 2014 | By Kate Linthicum
JERUSALEM - The crowd that gathered at the recent grand opening of Cinema City hadn't come for the movies. They were there in droves to protest a government regulation that keeps the 19-screen cineplex closed each week from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday. "Jerusalem, wake up!" the protesters chanted as security guards blocked them from entering the lobby. "Nonreligious people are equal too!" The demonstration was the latest skirmish in Jerusalem's long-running "Sabbath wars," which for decades have pitted the city's secular Jewish population against its ultra-Orthodox community over whether shops, theaters and other public spaces can remain open on the Jewish day of rest.
WORLD
December 30, 2013 | By Maher Abukhater
RAMALLAH, West Bank - Israel released 26 Palestinian prisoners early Tuesday, the third of four groups it promised to free as part of peace talks restarted during the summer. Most of the prisoners were from Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas' ruling Fatah faction and were serving long sentences for killing Israelis. Of the 26 prisoners, five were from Jerusalem, three from the Gaza Strip and the remainder were from the West Bank. It was the first time Israel freed prisoners from Jerusalem under the current agreement.
WORLD
December 29, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- Amid political and public debate, Israel approved the latest list of Palestinian prisoners it plans to release from jail this week, the government said Saturday night. It would be the third such group released in recent months. As part of the peace talks renewed through American efforts in July, Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu's government has agreed to release 104 long-serving Palestinian prisoners as the negotiations advance. The latest list, containing the names of 26 Palestinians serving long-term jail sentences for killing Israelis and other violent attacks carried out between 1985 and the 1993 Oslo accords, was published on the Israel Prison Service website [link in Hebrew]
NEWS
September 3, 2013 | By Jeff Spurrier
One of the enduring lessons of gardening life is to remember the recommendations of other gardeners. More than a year ago, musician and edible gardening consultant Lauri Krantz told me that she was stunned by a harvest of Jerusalem artichokes from only eight plants. Krantz, whom I profiled last year , had put them in a garden for chefs Suzanne Goin and David Lentz, mostly for the pretty yellow blooms that appear in August and last for a month. While transitioning the garden to fall, Krantz found more than 400 edible tubers in the soil, so many she needed help carrying them out of the garden.
OPINION
July 28, 2013
Re "U.S. 'neutrality' on Jerusalem," Editorial, July 25 What would we think if Spain or any other country decided that Puerto Rico was not really U.S. territory? Suppose it refused to accept U.S. passports issued to residents of San Juan. Wouldn't that be considered an intrusion? So how can our government tell residents of Jerusalem what country they live in? Marshall Giller Northridge ALSO: Letters: Kaiser's premium push Letters: Immigration issue takes off Letters: Sick over DWP's pay policies
OPINION
July 25, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
For those who don't follow the intricacies of Middle East diplomacy, it might seem self-evident that the passport of an American child born in Jerusalem should note "Israel" as his place of birth. That's also the view of Congress, which enacted legislation specifically allowing such a notation. But, like its predecessors of both parties, the Obama administration disagrees. This week, in a case involving a 10-year-old boy, a federal appeals court rightly ruled that the Constitution entrusts this decision to the executive branch.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON - American citizens born in Jerusalem cannot claim Israel as their place of birth on their passports, a federal appeals court in Washington ruled Tuesday. A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit unanimously declared unconstitutional a 2002 law that required the State Department to record Israel as the birthplace of Jerusalem-born citizens despite a long-standing position in the executive branch of strict neutrality toward sovereignty of the disputed city.
WORLD
July 9, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced Tuesday that top advisor Ron Dermer will become the country's next ambassador to the United States. Dermer is expected to replace Ambassador Michael Oren, whose four-year term ends this fall. Dermer worked closely with Netanyahu as a senior advisor during the last four years. “Ron Dermer has all the qualities to successfully fill this important post,” Netanyahu said Tuesday. Dermer, who is from Florida, moved to Israel in 1997.
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