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NEWS
July 26, 1996 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A caravan of automobiles inched along Bar Ilan Street on a Saturday afternoon, bearing signs with the greeting used by religious Jews who consider driving a desecration of the Sabbath: "Shabat shalom," the placards said mockingly. "Good Sabbath." From the sidewalks and center divider, thousands of ultra-Orthodox Jews and their children hurled epithets at the secular drivers. "Dogs! garbage!" they screamed. "You are not Jewish!" And a volley of stones pelted the car hoods.
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NEWS
July 26, 1996 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A caravan of automobiles inched along Bar Ilan Street on a Saturday afternoon, bearing signs with the greeting used by religious Jews who consider driving a desecration of the Sabbath: "Shabat shalom," the placards said mockingly. "Good Sabbath." From the sidewalks and center divider, thousands of ultra-Orthodox Jews and their children hurled epithets at the secular drivers. "Dogs! garbage!" they screamed. "You are not Jewish!" And a volley of stones pelted the car hoods.
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NEWS
September 29, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Israeli paratroopers in 1967 broke through the golden-gray stone walls and conquered the Old City, sacred ground to three great religions, Israeli leaders vowed that Jerusalem would never again be divided.
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Israeli paratroopers in 1967 broke through the golden-gray stone walls and conquered the Old City, sacred ground to three great religions, Israeli leaders vowed that Jerusalem would never again be divided.
NEWS
December 25, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The early morning sun slants through St. Stephen's Gate, casting exaggerated shadows along the Via Dolorosa. Muslim Arab men in traditional kaffiyeh headdress enter and turn immediately to the left, up the Street of the Gate of the Tribes toward what they call Haram al Sharif, "the Noble Sanctuary," for morning prayers at the Al Aqsa Mosque.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the middle of the Jewish Quarter of Jerusalem's Old City stand the ruins of a 12th-Century church named for St. Mary of the German Knights. When the ruins were uncovered, in the early 1970s, a sign was posted identifying the structure as a church, but the sign was defaced, and the authorities then classified the place as merely an archeological garden. Now, it is identified as St. Mary's German Hospice, though there has been an effort to scratch out those words.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the middle of the Jewish Quarter of Jerusalem's Old City stand the ruins of a 12th-Century church named for St. Mary of the German Knights. When the ruins were uncovered, in the early 1970s, a sign was posted identifying the structure as a church, but the sign was defaced, and the authorities then classified the place as merely an archeological garden. Now, it is identified as St. Mary's German Hospice, though there has been an effort to scratch out those words.
NEWS
December 25, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The early morning sun slants through St. Stephen's Gate, casting exaggerated shadows along the Via Dolorosa. Muslim Arab men in traditional kaffiyeh headdress enter and turn immediately to the left, up the Street of the Gate of the Tribes toward what they call Haram al Sharif, "the Noble Sanctuary," for morning prayers at the Al Aqsa Mosque.
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