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NEWS
April 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Ignoring an appeal from the United States, the General Assembly demanded that Israel stop building Jewish housing in disputed East Jerusalem. The U.N. resolution also called for an end to "all forms of support" for Israeli settlement activities. The action marked the first time that there has been anything remotely approaching a threat of collective international action. The vote was overwhelming--134-3, with 11 abstentions. The U.N.
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NEWS
December 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
Israel will not limit Jewish settlement construction in the West Bank or Jerusalem despite U.S. calls for a timeout, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Friday. Speaking in an interview, Netanyahu said that Secretary of State Madeleine Albright never defined what she meant by a timeout, and Israel will not freeze or cut back construction. "That's not going to happen," Netanyahu said, adding that the Israelis and the Palestinians should be free to accommodate burgeoning populations.
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NEWS
March 19, 1997 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bulldozers guarded by hundreds of heavily armed Israeli troops broke ground Tuesday for a new Jewish neighborhood in East Jerusalem, despite warnings that the action could provoke a violent Palestinian response and threaten the fragile peace process.
NEWS
September 16, 1997 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday denounced Jewish settlers who took up residence in two buildings in East Jerusalem, hinting that his government may, on grounds of public safety, evict the three families who moved into the Palestinian neighborhood under cover of night.
NEWS
July 28, 1997 | Reuters
A U.S. Jewish real estate baron authorized to build a Jewish enclave in the heart of an Arab neighborhood in East Jerusalem said Sunday that attempts to block the plan are "racist." Irving Moskowitz, a Miami-based businessman who bankrolls Jewish settlement in areas occupied by Israel, last week was granted a Jerusalem municipality permit to build about 65 apartments in Ras al Amud, an Arab neighborhood. "This is not a political issue.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Palestinian leaders warning of renewed violence, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu issued assurances to Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat on Friday that he will do everything possible to block construction of a newly approved Jewish housing project in the heart of traditionally Arab East Jerusalem.
NEWS
November 4, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The newly elected right-wing mayor of Jerusalem said Wednesday that he will encourage such heavy building across the line between the Arab and Jewish sides of the city that no peace negotiators will ever be able to divide it. "A mayor does have an influence on the infrastructure of the city. He can build the city, he can build in different parts of it, he can rezone and so on," Mayor-elect Ehud Olmert said.
NEWS
January 10, 1989
Israel's Supreme Court cleared the way for construction of a soccer stadium in Jerusalem, a move opposed by ultra-Orthodox Jews who fear that weekend games will desecrate the Sabbath. The ruling, which orders the Interior Ministry to sign the building permit, ended a 15-year battle to get the athletic field built and was a victory for Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek.
NEWS
July 29, 1997 | From Reuters
Israel on Monday put the brakes on a controversial plan to build new Jewish housing in traditionally Arab East Jerusalem and agreed to resume talks with the Palestinians on meeting commitments made under their interim peace deals. The Palestinian Authority praised the moves as steps to restore confidence but stressed that a months-long deadlock on proceeding with final peace talks continued.
NEWS
December 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
Israel will not limit Jewish settlement construction in the West Bank or Jerusalem despite U.S. calls for a timeout, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Friday. Speaking in an interview, Netanyahu said that Secretary of State Madeleine Albright never defined what she meant by a timeout, and Israel will not freeze or cut back construction. "That's not going to happen," Netanyahu said, adding that the Israelis and the Palestinians should be free to accommodate burgeoning populations.
NEWS
July 29, 1997 | From Reuters
Israel on Monday put the brakes on a controversial plan to build new Jewish housing in traditionally Arab East Jerusalem and agreed to resume talks with the Palestinians on meeting commitments made under their interim peace deals. The Palestinian Authority praised the moves as steps to restore confidence but stressed that a months-long deadlock on proceeding with final peace talks continued.
NEWS
July 28, 1997 | Reuters
A U.S. Jewish real estate baron authorized to build a Jewish enclave in the heart of an Arab neighborhood in East Jerusalem said Sunday that attempts to block the plan are "racist." Irving Moskowitz, a Miami-based businessman who bankrolls Jewish settlement in areas occupied by Israel, last week was granted a Jerusalem municipality permit to build about 65 apartments in Ras al Amud, an Arab neighborhood. "This is not a political issue.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Palestinian leaders warning of renewed violence, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu issued assurances to Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat on Friday that he will do everything possible to block construction of a newly approved Jewish housing project in the heart of traditionally Arab East Jerusalem.
NEWS
April 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Ignoring an appeal from the United States, the General Assembly demanded that Israel stop building Jewish housing in disputed East Jerusalem. The U.N. resolution also called for an end to "all forms of support" for Israeli settlement activities. The action marked the first time that there has been anything remotely approaching a threat of collective international action. The vote was overwhelming--134-3, with 11 abstentions. The U.N.
NEWS
March 21, 1997 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Feras Jihad, 14, carefully selected a small, smooth stone for the slingshot he had crafted. Suddenly, the Palestinian boy dashed out from behind a wall, swung the weapon around his head and hurled the rock toward Israeli soldiers crouched across an open field. He missed. But neither he nor his friends seemed to care. "We are defending our land," Ayman Ismail, 15, said proudly of the boys' decision to join a group of demonstrators confronting Israeli troops here Thursday.
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bulldozers guarded by hundreds of heavily armed Israeli troops broke ground Tuesday for a new Jewish neighborhood in East Jerusalem, despite warnings that the action could provoke a violent Palestinian response and threaten the fragile peace process.
NEWS
September 16, 1997 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday denounced Jewish settlers who took up residence in two buildings in East Jerusalem, hinting that his government may, on grounds of public safety, evict the three families who moved into the Palestinian neighborhood under cover of night.
NEWS
March 21, 1997 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Feras Jihad, 14, carefully selected a small, smooth stone for the slingshot he had crafted. Suddenly, the Palestinian boy dashed out from behind a wall, swung the weapon around his head and hurled the rock toward Israeli soldiers crouched across an open field. He missed. But neither he nor his friends seemed to care. "We are defending our land," Ayman Ismail, 15, said proudly of the boys' decision to join a group of demonstrators confronting Israeli troops here Thursday.
NEWS
March 4, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton waded back into the Mideast peace process Monday, criticizing Israel's decision to build housing on the outskirts of East Jerusalem as a move that "builds mistrust" and meeting with Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat at the White House. Before starting his meeting with Arafat, Clinton said of the planned Israeli development: "I wish [the decision] had not been made. I don't think it builds confidence, I think it builds mistrust."
NEWS
November 4, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The newly elected right-wing mayor of Jerusalem said Wednesday that he will encourage such heavy building across the line between the Arab and Jewish sides of the city that no peace negotiators will ever be able to divide it. "A mayor does have an influence on the infrastructure of the city. He can build the city, he can build in different parts of it, he can rezone and so on," Mayor-elect Ehud Olmert said.
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