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NEWS
April 22, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the middle of the Jewish Quarter of Jerusalem's Old City stand the ruins of a 12th-Century church named for St. Mary of the German Knights. When the ruins were uncovered, in the early 1970s, a sign was posted identifying the structure as a church, but the sign was defaced, and the authorities then classified the place as merely an archeological garden. Now, it is identified as St. Mary's German Hospice, though there has been an effort to scratch out those words.
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NEWS
September 29, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Israeli paratroopers in 1967 broke through the golden-gray stone walls and conquered the Old City, sacred ground to three great religions, Israeli leaders vowed that Jerusalem would never again be divided.
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NEWS
September 29, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Israeli paratroopers in 1967 broke through the golden-gray stone walls and conquered the Old City, sacred ground to three great religions, Israeli leaders vowed that Jerusalem would never again be divided.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the middle of the Jewish Quarter of Jerusalem's Old City stand the ruins of a 12th-Century church named for St. Mary of the German Knights. When the ruins were uncovered, in the early 1970s, a sign was posted identifying the structure as a church, but the sign was defaced, and the authorities then classified the place as merely an archeological garden. Now, it is identified as St. Mary's German Hospice, though there has been an effort to scratch out those words.
TRAVEL
September 17, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS JR., Times Staff Writer
From atop the Herodian towers of the ancient Citadel anchoring the Old City at Jaffa Gate, Jerusalem carpets the surrounding hills. The Dome of the Rock, the Mount of Olives, the expanding modern city to the west and north--it's a million-dollar view. In April, a new door opened on Jerusalem's 4,000 years of history in the old stone troop quarters of the Citadel. The Tower of David, a museum of Jerusalem's history that cost $10 million, is distinct among its counterparts in this historic city.
NEWS
August 23, 1992 | Associated Press
Here are the menus of six meals representing Jerusalem's culinary history: King Solomon's court: Pheasant, rack of lamb and a cornucopia of vegetables and fruit. Greek-style banquet: Pickled eggs, roasted and smoked meats, apples, almonds, pears, cakes, rice, wine and fruit. * Crusader dinner: Roast rack of lamb, European and Oriental desserts including bananas and heavily sugared sweets. * Sultan's soup kitchen: Rice, groats and bread.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2011 | By Wendy Smith, Special to Tribune Newspapers
Simon Sebag Montefiore's epic survey of Jerusalem's sanguinary history does not inspire confidence in the civilizing qualities of religion. The pile of corpses accumulated over millenniums from the persecutions both perpetrated and endured by all three of the faiths - Christianity, Islam and Judaism - that have contended for Jerusalem would surely be high enough to reach the celestial home of any one of them. Not that politicians come off any better than believers here. Anyone frustrated by the intractable stalemate in the contemporary Middle East peace process may take grim comfort from the knowledge that Jerusalem has been a flash point for global warfare since the time of the Egyptian pharaohs: "the desire and prize of empires," as Montefiore puts it, "yet of no strategic value.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1997 | BENJAMIN HUBBARD and NINIAN SMART, Benjamin Hubbard is chairman of the Religious Studies Department at Cal State Fullerton. His book, "America's Religions: An Educator's Guide to Beliefs and Practices," will be released in June. Ninian Smart is J.F. Rowny Professor of Comparative Religions at UC Santa Barbara
The UC system has, in every main campus, departments of philosophy and political science, but only one which offers a full menu of religious studies, including doctoral studies. Is it because of prejudice? Or because the subject is new? You thought it had to do with Christian (and maybe Jewish) theology. No, and it is not some kind of religious indoctrination. It is the wider study of all religions, in principle, considering their power in the world in the past and now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1998 | DOUG STRUCK, THE WASHINGTON POST
Israeli archeologists have cleared part of the path they say they believe was taken by Jesus as he entered this city not long before his crucifixion. They have dug through nearly two millenniums of rubble and construction to reveal a path of broad white stone tiles, passing under what was then a colossal arch at the foot of the Jewish Temple's towering outer walls.
NEWS
July 4, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As hundreds of angry Jews clashed with police outside his office Sunday, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin defended the Mideast peace accord and accused his opponents of inciting violence with scare stories of a Palestinian-controlled Jerusalem. "I'll put it simply: It's a political outrage," Rabin told a caucus meeting of his Labor Party. "There is no disagreement regarding the unity of Jerusalem, our sovereignty over it or its continuation as the capital of Israel."
TRAVEL
September 17, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS JR., Times Staff Writer
From atop the Herodian towers of the ancient Citadel anchoring the Old City at Jaffa Gate, Jerusalem carpets the surrounding hills. The Dome of the Rock, the Mount of Olives, the expanding modern city to the west and north--it's a million-dollar view. In April, a new door opened on Jerusalem's 4,000 years of history in the old stone troop quarters of the Citadel. The Tower of David, a museum of Jerusalem's history that cost $10 million, is distinct among its counterparts in this historic city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2000 | DANIEL PIPES, Daniel Pipes is director of the Philadelphia-based Middle East Forum
At its base, the debate over Jerusalem consists of an argument between Jews and Muslims over who has the older, better documented and deeper ties to the Holy City. A cursory review of the facts shows that there is not much of a contest. Jerusalem has a unique importance to Jews. It has a unique place in Jewish law and a pervasive presence in the Jewish religion. Jews pray toward Jerusalem, mourn the destruction of their Temple there and wishfully repeat the phrase, "Next year in Jerusalem."
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