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Jerusalem Population

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NEWS
January 9, 1992 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old saying that you can't fight City Hall has been turned on its head in this divided and tense capital of religious and political extremes. Teddy Kollek, perhaps the world's best known mayor, is finding that his own City Hall can't fight. Kollek, one of the last grand figures of Zionism, clings to a vision of a united city of disparate groups living in separate but equal communities in mutual respect.
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NEWS
May 26, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Host to sites sacred to Muslims, Christians and Jews, Jerusalem's walled Old City is ground zero in the sometimes deadly struggle between Arabs and Jews over this ancient city. Inside the stone walls whose foundations were laid by Saladin, the Kurd who defeated the Crusaders and restored Muslim rule here 800 years ago, the three communities have for centuries alternated between uneasy coexistence and open warfare.
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NEWS
May 26, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Host to sites sacred to Muslims, Christians and Jews, Jerusalem's walled Old City is ground zero in the sometimes deadly struggle between Arabs and Jews over this ancient city. Inside the stone walls whose foundations were laid by Saladin, the Kurd who defeated the Crusaders and restored Muslim rule here 800 years ago, the three communities have for centuries alternated between uneasy coexistence and open warfare.
NEWS
January 29, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mohamed Ahmad Hairsh and 21 other families in the Jahaleen Bedouin tribe rejoiced on the day that Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization signed their historic peace declaration last September. Their tin shanties weren't much--a barrio of scrap metal built into mud and rock in the shadow of the largest Jewish settlement in the Israeli-occupied West Bank. But the huts are the only home these members of the nomadic Arab tribe have known since settling there, members claim, decades ago.
NEWS
January 29, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mohamed Ahmad Hairsh and 21 other families in the Jahaleen Bedouin tribe rejoiced on the day that Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization signed their historic peace declaration last September. Their tin shanties weren't much--a barrio of scrap metal built into mud and rock in the shadow of the largest Jewish settlement in the Israeli-occupied West Bank. But the huts are the only home these members of the nomadic Arab tribe have known since settling there, members claim, decades ago.
TRAVEL
April 25, 1999
Congratulations to Alan Behr on a wry, thoughtful and well-written article ("Journeys of Faith," April 4). He has unintentionally captured the reasons why people travel to distant lands to experience the wisdom and knowledge gained by studying other cultures. While his article ends on the note of the conflicts in Jerusalem's population, I was heartened by Israel's reaction to the sudden expulsion of the Albanian population from Kosovo: Without debate, a shipment of humanitarian aid was quietly and immediately sent to the refugees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1998
Israel's decision to greatly expand the boundaries of its capital, Jerusalem, delivers another blow to the reeling peace process and another snub to U.S. efforts to keep that process alive. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright objected in advance to the Israeli Cabinet's approval of the expansion plan, which she diplomatically labeled as "not helpful" to advancing talks with the Palestinians. Her spokesman, James P.
NEWS
November 12, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an electoral victory that will intensify the fight over this disputed city's character and future, religious and ultra-Orthodox parties won nearly half the seats on Jerusalem's City Council, election results showed Wednesday. The growing influence of the ultra-Orthodox, or haredim, and the efforts by secular Jews to oppose that influence represent the greatest single social conflict in Israel today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1995 | MARSHALL J. BREGER, Marshall J. Breger is a senior fellow at the Heritage Foundation and a visiting professor at Catholic University Law School. He was a special assistant to President Reagan and his liaison with the Jewish community
No solution to the issue of Jerusalem's status will work if it is not grounded in the reality that the city must remain united and under Israeli sovereignty. Jerusalem holds a unique place in Jewish theology and history. Since the time of King David, it has been at the center of Jewish consciousness.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2007 | Martin Rubin, Special to The Times
THE title of this lively book, "Jerusalem 1913," is a little misleading because less than a quarter of its pages actually deal with the city in that year. Rather it is a focal point for its author, Amy Dockser Marcus, to examine the inevitability of the clash between Jewish and Arab nationalisms in Palestine.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old saying that you can't fight City Hall has been turned on its head in this divided and tense capital of religious and political extremes. Teddy Kollek, perhaps the world's best known mayor, is finding that his own City Hall can't fight. Kollek, one of the last grand figures of Zionism, clings to a vision of a united city of disparate groups living in separate but equal communities in mutual respect.
NEWS
July 13, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In East Jerusalem, where streets are named for sultans and legendary Muslim warriors, Arab women in embroidered dresses jostled on the sidewalk Wednesday selling mint and cilantro. Old men in checkered kaffiyehs sat on plastic chairs, seeking shade and sipping sweet tea. Children walked home from classes where they study a Jordanian curriculum. An Israeli police van passed, an agent inside barking orders through a megaphone to pedestrians and to minibus drivers double-parked near Damascus Gate.
NEWS
March 29, 1994 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a new mayor in a new city hall, "Teddy's town," as Jerusalem was known for more than 25 years, is changing fast. Ehud Olmert, a hard-line member of Israel's former hard-line Likud government, has taken over as mayor from Teddy Kollek, the legendary "Lion of Jerusalem," and after fewer than four months this is no longer "Teddy's town."
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