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Jervey Tervalon

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March 20, 1994 | Bob Sipchen, Times Staff Writer Bob Sipchen is the author of "Baby Insane and the Buddha," recently released by Bantam in paperback
Put yourself in Francois' head. One moment he's idly tossing a football with his pal, burning up the tail end of his childhood the way American kids are supposed to do. Next thing, boom boom , his friend's dead, killed by a crack-addict girlfriend, and it looks as though Francois is going to be stuck in a narrative that reads like tired gangsta rap. Jervey Tervalon's "Understand This" does cover some familiar of the lyrical turf of the Ices--T and Cube.
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BOOKS
August 14, 1994
Regarding Jervey Tervalon's review of Melba Pattillo Beals' memoirs of integration, "Warriors Don't Cry," (Book Review, July 3), I can clearly recall the Little Rock incident, and as it occurred during the period of the sedate '50s, it was quite an earth-shattering incident indeed! However, I thought Tervalon's review was truly lacking in that there was not one mention of the two men who figured so prominently in the affair: the still very much alive Orville Faubus, the governor of Arkansas who was projected from relative obscurity into worldwide prominence overnight, and President Eisenhower, facing one of his few genuine challenges during his eight years of virtual "status quo" presidency.
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NEWS
July 31, 1994 | JERVEY TERVALON
Jervey Tervalon, 35, grew up on 2nd Avenue, attended Dorsey High School, graduated from UC Santa Barbara and earned a degree from the UC Irvine writers program. His first novel, "Understand This," was published this year. It tells the story of a murdered teen-ager through the voices of the boy's friends, relatives and acquaintances. Tervalon drew on his experiences growing up in Central Los Angeles and as a teacher in South-Central. He lives with his wife and baby daughter in Pasadena.
NEWS
July 31, 1994 | JERVEY TERVALON
Jervey Tervalon, 35, grew up on 2nd Avenue, attended Dorsey High School, graduated from UC Santa Barbara and earned a degree from the UC Irvine writers program. His first novel, "Understand This," was published this year. It tells the story of a murdered teen-ager through the voices of the boy's friends, relatives and acquaintances. Tervalon drew on his experiences growing up in Central Los Angeles and as a teacher in South-Central. He lives with his wife and baby daughter in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989
Dennis Hunt, in his March 19 Record Rack item, suggests that N.W.A.'s rap songs reveal the grimness of inner-city life without "prissy moralizing" and that N.W.A.'s contempt for the black woman cannot be abhorred because inner-city life has to be judged by a different set of rules. I am disgusted by this patronizing attitude. Maybe Mr. Hunt ought to buy KRS-1's "Self Destruction" and listen to the "prissy moralizing" of young rappers agonizing over the senseless violence afflicting inner-city communities across the nation and then pass this information on to Easy-E and the rest of N.W.A.
BOOKS
August 14, 1994
Regarding Jervey Tervalon's review of Melba Pattillo Beals' memoirs of integration, "Warriors Don't Cry," (Book Review, July 3), I can clearly recall the Little Rock incident, and as it occurred during the period of the sedate '50s, it was quite an earth-shattering incident indeed! However, I thought Tervalon's review was truly lacking in that there was not one mention of the two men who figured so prominently in the affair: the still very much alive Orville Faubus, the governor of Arkansas who was projected from relative obscurity into worldwide prominence overnight, and President Eisenhower, facing one of his few genuine challenges during his eight years of virtual "status quo" presidency.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1991
As Gov. Pete Wilson prepares to balance the state budget on the backs of schoolchildren, he should be aware of the relationship between cuts in education, health care and job training, and the serious rise of crime in California. There is a relationship between crime and lack of public services and it's expressed every minute of the day; we see it in the violence of drive-by shootings, in the highest percentage of incarceration for black males in the country, in the rise of teen-age pregnancy and even more tragically, in the growing numbers of cocaine babies entering the school system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1992
In response to George Will's Column Right (Sept. 28): It astounds me that Will, like Pete Wilson, seems to think of public education as an entitlement, essentially a concession to another one of those damn-able special interests as opposed to one of the primary institutions that enabled technological advancements to take root in America. But now that public schools educate mostly children of color, the governor can't find the wherewithal to support the schools. Will and Wilson both take umbrage at the actions of schoolchildren who are participating in a letter-writing campaign against the obviously inadequate support of public schools.
NEWS
February 20, 1994 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing up in South-Central Los Angeles in the '70s, Jervey Tervalon managed to avoid getting caught up in the burgeoning gang lifestyle. When outside gang members would scale the fence at notoriously tough Foshay Junior High School like a band of marauders, he and a friend would hide in the gym-ball box. In high school, he and his college-bound friends were interested in girls and grades, not gangs and guns.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2012
Panel: Fiction: At Loose Ends When: April 21, 12:00 p.m. Where: Annenberg Auditorium on the USC campus Who: Seth Greenland, Eleanor Henderson, Josh Rolnick, Jervey Tervalon, moderator Rachel Resnick Information: http://events.latimes.com/festivalofbooks
BOOKS
March 20, 1994 | Bob Sipchen, Times Staff Writer Bob Sipchen is the author of "Baby Insane and the Buddha," recently released by Bantam in paperback
Put yourself in Francois' head. One moment he's idly tossing a football with his pal, burning up the tail end of his childhood the way American kids are supposed to do. Next thing, boom boom , his friend's dead, killed by a crack-addict girlfriend, and it looks as though Francois is going to be stuck in a narrative that reads like tired gangsta rap. Jervey Tervalon's "Understand This" does cover some familiar of the lyrical turf of the Ices--T and Cube.
NEWS
February 20, 1994 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing up in South-Central Los Angeles in the '70s, Jervey Tervalon managed to avoid getting caught up in the burgeoning gang lifestyle. When outside gang members would scale the fence at notoriously tough Foshay Junior High School like a band of marauders, he and a friend would hide in the gym-ball box. In high school, he and his college-bound friends were interested in girls and grades, not gangs and guns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1992
In response to George Will's Column Right (Sept. 28): It astounds me that Will, like Pete Wilson, seems to think of public education as an entitlement, essentially a concession to another one of those damn-able special interests as opposed to one of the primary institutions that enabled technological advancements to take root in America. But now that public schools educate mostly children of color, the governor can't find the wherewithal to support the schools. Will and Wilson both take umbrage at the actions of schoolchildren who are participating in a letter-writing campaign against the obviously inadequate support of public schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1991
As Gov. Pete Wilson prepares to balance the state budget on the backs of schoolchildren, he should be aware of the relationship between cuts in education, health care and job training, and the serious rise of crime in California. There is a relationship between crime and lack of public services and it's expressed every minute of the day; we see it in the violence of drive-by shootings, in the highest percentage of incarceration for black males in the country, in the rise of teen-age pregnancy and even more tragically, in the growing numbers of cocaine babies entering the school system.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989
Dennis Hunt, in his March 19 Record Rack item, suggests that N.W.A.'s rap songs reveal the grimness of inner-city life without "prissy moralizing" and that N.W.A.'s contempt for the black woman cannot be abhorred because inner-city life has to be judged by a different set of rules. I am disgusted by this patronizing attitude. Maybe Mr. Hunt ought to buy KRS-1's "Self Destruction" and listen to the "prissy moralizing" of young rappers agonizing over the senseless violence afflicting inner-city communities across the nation and then pass this information on to Easy-E and the rest of N.W.A.
MAGAZINE
February 20, 2000
I was deeply moved by Jervey Tervalon's statement about his encounter with Marvin Mudrick ("A Novel Education," Jan. 23). In 1949, I entered Dr. Mudrick's class at UCSB. I think it was a first for both of us: the first class Dr. Mudrick had ever taught at UCSB and, for me, the first class where a teacher dynamited conventional, lazy responses and made reading momentous. From his lovely article, I know that Tervalon is continuing Dr. Mudrick's legacy. Michael Mahon Professor Emeritus of Literature Cal State Dominguez Hills
OPINION
July 10, 2003
Re "West Coast Gumbo," Opinion, July 6: How wonderful to call Los Angeles, the city where I grew up, the new New Orleans. Yes, there are many cultures here, and many of us who come from more than one culture. That is what I love about Los Angeles -- you can have a panaderia, gyros and Vietnamese pho place sharing the same parking lot; and you can have boba drinks with your Krispy Kremes at the local doughnut shop. More important, you can go to school and work with people who share ideas, music, books, politics and movies that challenge your own worldview every day. We are all shaped by our neighbors and the prevailing cultures of our personal and work lives.
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