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Jerzy Grotowski

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerzy Grotowski, widely considered the world's most daring and influential theater director, has died in Pontedera, Italy. He was 65 when he died Thursday after a lengthy battle with leukemia. "No one since Stanislavsky has investigated the nature of acting, its phenomenon, its meaning, the nature and science of its mental-physical-emotional processes as deeply and completely as Grotowski," British director Peter Brook once said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Much innovative theater these days is certainly "poor," but not gladly so. Given the glorification of wealth in our popular culture, to say nothing of the inflated prices of the art market, poverty is hardly in. But then long ago that happy-go-lucky gang in "La Boheme," so often portrayed by overstuffed opera singers for well-heeled patrons, gave a bad name to the romantic concept of creativity in garrets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1990 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
Enigmatic drama theorist Jerzy Grotowski, in a rare public lecture Sunday, called on universities to rescue the idea of ensemble theater. At UC Irvine, addressing his audience in halting English, the Polish-born director, who founded the influential Polish Laboratory Theatre in the 1960s, called for a new commitment to Konstantin Stanislavsky's theories of ensemble, which he said have been all but abandoned by American commercial theater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerzy Grotowski, widely considered the world's most daring and influential theater director, has died in Pontedera, Italy. He was 65 when he died Thursday after a lengthy battle with leukemia. "No one since Stanislavsky has investigated the nature of acting, its phenomenon, its meaning, the nature and science of its mental-physical-emotional processes as deeply and completely as Grotowski," British director Peter Brook once said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1991 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Jerzy Grotowski, the 57-year-old Polish theater artist who established a program in "Objective Drama" at UC Irvine in 1983, is back on the campus through Monday to help put the program back on track. Sunday evening, Stephen Barker, the university's new drama department chairman, said the program has been "on the wane" and that he and Grotowski would be spending the week discussing ways to organize future workshops.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Much innovative theater these days is certainly "poor," but not gladly so. Given the glorification of wealth in our popular culture, to say nothing of the inflated prices of the art market, poverty is hardly in. But then long ago that happy-go-lucky gang in "La Boheme," so often portrayed by overstuffed opera singers for well-heeled patrons, gave a bad name to the romantic concept of creativity in garrets.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1985
UC Irvine's Focused Research Program in Objective Drama, directed by drama theorist Jerzy Grotowski, has been awarded a $50,000 grant from the Rockefeller Foundation. Established at UCI in 1983, the program is a long-term research and development project in performance arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1999
It was with great interest that I read the article on the Stella Adler Theatre and Academy of Acting and Irene Gilbert and Leonora Schildkraut ("After 50 Years, It's Still a Class Act," by Diane Haithman, Jan. 31). I had the unique experience of working with these two women during the initial years of operation in the new facilities and couldn't agree more about their enthusiasm, energy, commitment and, most important, integrity. One of the reasons the space works so well--for students, faculty, productions and audiences--is one of the finest theater architects that L.A. has to offer: John Sergio Fisher.
BOOKS
March 13, 1994 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
IN THE SHADOW OF THE FLAME: Three Journeys by Margaret Croyden. (Continuum: $17.95; 169 pp.) Driven by a "serious distaste for life," a midlife nagging emptiness from the past, Croyden (author, English professor, and experimental theater critic in New York), without any formal plan, embarks on three very different journeys that each add their shovel of dirt to the hole in her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1991 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Jerzy Grotowski, the 57-year-old Polish theater artist who established a program in "Objective Drama" at UC Irvine in 1983, is back on the campus through Monday to help put the program back on track. Sunday evening, Stephen Barker, the university's new drama department chairman, said the program has been "on the wane" and that he and Grotowski would be spending the week discussing ways to organize future workshops.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1990 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
Enigmatic drama theorist Jerzy Grotowski, in a rare public lecture Sunday, called on universities to rescue the idea of ensemble theater. At UC Irvine, addressing his audience in halting English, the Polish-born director, who founded the influential Polish Laboratory Theatre in the 1960s, called for a new commitment to Konstantin Stanislavsky's theories of ensemble, which he said have been all but abandoned by American commercial theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2004 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
"A good soul is not easily forgotten. There aren't many." Thus goes "The Good Soul of Szechwan" at the Electric Lodge in Venice. This sharp new take on Bertolt Brecht's didactic classic is idiomatic postmillennial theater of estrangement. Brecht wrote "Der gute Mensch von Sezuan" in 1943, during his fertile exile from Hitler's Berlin. After an opening address from an artless child (Daisy O'Bryan, who alternates with Zola Jane and Sylvie Rae), a poetic agitprop parable transpires.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1999 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Only a handful of theater artists in the 20th century have had as profound an impact as Jerzy Grotowski. Indeed, the Polish director and thinker--who died in Pontedera, Italy, on Jan. 14 at age 65--leaves a legacy that's more widespread than is generally known. There's hardly a theater artist working today who hasn't been affected, directly or indirectly, by Grotowski's ideas.
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