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Jerzy Kosinski

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February 21, 1988 | WANDA URBANSKA, Urbanska is an author and journalist living in Virginia .
Maria Konwicki is in town visiting her father, the celebrated Polish writer Tadeusz Konwicki. This is her first trip to her native Poland in six years, and after three weeks, she's grown stir-crazy for New York City, her home now. On this particular morning, however, her spirits are riding high: Her plane for the States departs tomorrow.
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May 12, 1996 | Julia Bloch Frey, Julia Frey's recent biography, "Toulouse-Lautrec: A Life," won the 1995 Pen Center West award for nonfiction and was a finalist for a 1994 National Book Critics Circle Award
He loved to tell outrageous lies, particularly to the rich, intellectual and famous. They were so eager to be entertained, he explained, that they willingly suspended disbelief, and they were so confident of their superiority that they deserved to be played for fools. "Court jester" to his powerful American friends, that's how Jerzy Kosinski sometimes referred to himself. Even the truths of Kosinski's life are astonishing in their variety and complexity.
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NEWS
May 4, 1991 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerzy Kosinski, the Polish-born novelist and World War II Holocaust survivor who won acclaim with such best-sellers as "The Painted Bird" and "Being There," killed himself Friday morning, apparently despondent over failing health. His body was discovered by his wife, Katherina von Fraunhofer-Kosinski, at about 9:30 a.m. in the bathroom of their mid-town Manhattan apartment, police said. Kosinski, who was 57, was found naked in a tub half full of water with a plastic bag tied over his head.
BOOKS
November 22, 1992 | ALEX RAKSIN
PASSING BY: Selected Essays, 1962-1991 by Jerzy Kosinski (Random House: $23; 262 pp.). When Jerzy Kosinski killed himself last year, many of his fans and friends were stumped: Why only a few hours earlier, said writer Gay Talese, Kosinski had been entertaining at my apartment, "as cheerful and smart as ever." Kosinski seemed to embody the kind of optimism of people gifted with a second chance at life. Arriving penniless in the U.S.
BOOKS
May 12, 1996 | Julia Bloch Frey, Julia Frey's recent biography, "Toulouse-Lautrec: A Life," won the 1995 Pen Center West award for nonfiction and was a finalist for a 1994 National Book Critics Circle Award
He loved to tell outrageous lies, particularly to the rich, intellectual and famous. They were so eager to be entertained, he explained, that they willingly suspended disbelief, and they were so confident of their superiority that they deserved to be played for fools. "Court jester" to his powerful American friends, that's how Jerzy Kosinski sometimes referred to himself. Even the truths of Kosinski's life are astonishing in their variety and complexity.
BOOKS
September 25, 1988 | Brett Singer, Singer is the author of "The Petting Zoo" and "Footstool in Heaven ."
It is impossible to say anything about Jerzy Kosinski that he hasn't already said about himself, and said better. Kosinski's ninth novel approaches the world from a dizzying, mystical, word- and world-drunk point of view. His narrator, the driver of his self-declared "autofiction," is an emigre Polish writer significantly named Norbert Kosky.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jerzy Kosinski, the award-winning Polish-born novelist who died of an apparent suicide earlier this month, has left his entire literary estate to Spertus College of Judaica in Chicago, it was disclosed. His will was offered for probate in Manhattan Surrogate Court. Under its terms, his widow, Katherina Kosinski, will inherit an apartment in Switzerland and the income from a $750,000 trust fund.
BOOKS
November 22, 1992 | ALEX RAKSIN
PASSING BY: Selected Essays, 1962-1991 by Jerzy Kosinski (Random House: $23; 262 pp.). When Jerzy Kosinski killed himself last year, many of his fans and friends were stumped: Why only a few hours earlier, said writer Gay Talese, Kosinski had been entertaining at my apartment, "as cheerful and smart as ever." Kosinski seemed to embody the kind of optimism of people gifted with a second chance at life. Arriving penniless in the U.S.
BOOKS
April 3, 1988
In "The Lesson of Jerzy Kosinski's Telex Machine" (Book Review, Feb. 21), Wanda Urbanska writes that Tadeusz Konwicki "was struck by the presence of a Telex machine near Kosinski's study, instantaneously dispatching book reviews and the like." I am sorry to disappoint your readers, but--tough ticky!--what Konwicki quite likely saw during his visit to my two-room New York flat was an ordinary desk-top copying machine, as I have never owned or rented a Telex. I write on a portable non-electric typewriter, and till this day don't use a word processor.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1994
Regarding "Forrest Gump's Proud Dad" (Aug. 7), "Gump Happens," the current ad line for "Forrest Gump," pretty much sums up my own opinion of the film, and I have no desire to step in it again--especially not the sequel referred to in Robert Epstein's Film Clips Q&A with Gump author Winston Groom. As a matter of fact, I have no desire to read the book upon which the film is based, nor do I wish to hear Mr. Groom reading it. Furthermore, if there are any Gump T-shirts and baseball caps anticipated, count me out on those as well.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Author Jerzy Kosinski's death at 57 last month was from ingesting a lethal amount of alcohol and drugs, autopsy results showed. Kosinski, found dead May 3 in the bathtub of his Upper West Side Manhattan apartment, succumbed to the combined effects of gluthemide, a generic prescription sleeping drug, and barbiturates, opiates and alcohol, said Ellen Borakove, a spokeswoman for the city medical examiner's office. She declined to specify the amounts of each drug found.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerzy Kosinski, the Polish-born novelist and World War II Holocaust survivor who won acclaim with such best-sellers as "The Painted Bird" and "Being There," killed himself Friday morning, apparently despondent over failing health. His body was discovered by his wife, Katherina von Fraunhofer-Kosinski, at about 9:30 a.m. in the bathroom of their mid-town Manhattan apartment, police said. Kosinski, who was 57, was found naked in a tub half full of water with a plastic bag tied over his head.
BOOKS
September 25, 1988 | Brett Singer, Singer is the author of "The Petting Zoo" and "Footstool in Heaven ."
It is impossible to say anything about Jerzy Kosinski that he hasn't already said about himself, and said better. Kosinski's ninth novel approaches the world from a dizzying, mystical, word- and world-drunk point of view. His narrator, the driver of his self-declared "autofiction," is an emigre Polish writer significantly named Norbert Kosky.
BOOKS
February 21, 1988 | WANDA URBANSKA, Urbanska is an author and journalist living in Virginia .
Maria Konwicki is in town visiting her father, the celebrated Polish writer Tadeusz Konwicki. This is her first trip to her native Poland in six years, and after three weeks, she's grown stir-crazy for New York City, her home now. On this particular morning, however, her spirits are riding high: Her plane for the States departs tomorrow.
NEWS
March 10, 1986 | Associated Press
Political and business leaders from across the nation joined other mourners today at the funeral for former Sen. Jacob K. Javits, praised for his courageous fight against illness and his distinguished record in Congress. "He went not quietly into the valley of death, but fought it and left radiantly as an example for the ages," Sen. Daniel P. Moynihan (D-N.Y.), who served with Javits, told the 1,400 people attending the service.
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