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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1989 | DAVID REYES
It has been 18 years since Jess Araujo was a student at Rancho Santiago College, in what he called his jeans-and-tennis-shoes days. Araujo, this time wearing a tailored, dark blue suit, returned to the campus Wednesday for a reception in his honor. Araujo is now a successful Santa Ana attorney, businessman and author of a newly published book titled, "The Law and Your Legal Rights."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1989 | DAVID REYES
It has been 18 years since Jess Araujo was a student at Rancho Santiago College, in what he called his jeans-and-tennis-shoes days. Araujo, this time wearing a tailored, dark blue suit, returned to the campus Wednesday for a reception in his honor. Araujo is now a successful Santa Ana attorney, businessman and author of a newly published book titled, "The Law and Your Legal Rights."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1997
A town hall meeting on issues affecting the Latino community is set for Thursday at Cal State Fullerton. The forum is the second in a series of dialogues being sponsored by the university to highlight political, economic and social issues facing Orange County. Featured panelists are to include Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Garden Grove); Jess Araujo, president of Latin American Voters of America and general counsel to the Mexican Consulate; Sister Carmen Sarati of Sisters of St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1998 | MIMI KO CRUZ and LISA ADDISON
The Hispanic Bar Assn. of Orange County will honor a judge, an attorney and a congresswoman at its 20th annual installation and awards ceremony Feb. 28. Municipal Judge Francis Munoz will receive the group's Cesar Chavez Community Services Award, lawyer Jess Araujo will receive the Special Recognition Award and Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Garden Grove) will get the Legislator of the Year Award. In addition, the association will introduce its new officers for 1998.
NEWS
December 5, 1996
"There's a general feeling of basically disappointment ranging all the way to disgust. At a minimum, an effort could have been made to publicly consider other candidates. . . . [The board] is not representative of what the constituency is." --Jess Araujo, Santa Ana attorney, Latino activist and general counsel to the Mexican Consulate * "I was very pleased that South Orange County at last has someone to represent them. Tom is very capable of doing the job."
NEWS
May 6, 1998 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County-based group that co-sponsored Proposition 187 has fanned the flames of controversy again by unveiling a billboard this week near the Arizona border welcoming visitors to "California, The Illegal Immigrant State." The billboard, which went up Monday along Interstate 10 near Blythe, Calif., is the latest tactic of the California Coalition for Immigration Reform in the emotional debate over immigration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1998 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of Latino groups praised Orange County officials Wednesday for releasing new election material explaining that citizens naturalized less than 30 days before an election are eligible to vote. "Nobody knew about this, because the materials they routinely published didn't include it," Santa Ana attorney Jess Araujo said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1995
California's population is at least one-quarter Latino, yet in the November election only 8% of the voters were Latino. In Orange County, the estimate was 5%. This appallingly low turnout occurred despite the fact that the ballot included an item of special concern to Latinos--Proposition 187, an initiative to cut off most aid to illegal immigrants. A number of groups long have tried to get more Latinos to register and vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County grand jury, which has been sharply criticized for its lack of ethnic diversity, will have a membership in the next fiscal year that is more than 40% nonwhite, the greatest percentage in recent years, if not ever. Orange County Superior Court officials had launched an aggressive recruitment campaign that widened the pool of potential minority candidates. Twenty percent of the 172 people who applied were members of minorities, most of them Latino.
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