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NEWS
September 22, 1994
As the sponsor of the proposal to create Raymond Chandler Square in Hollywood, I wish to clarify a misperception implied by a recent letter ("Hollywood: Street Name Change Draws Fire," Matthew L. Lesniak, Sept. 4). The letter complained about the spate of street name change proposals in Hollywood, in which a historic name may be pasted over with that of a more recent figure. In the same breath, the letter linked my just-adopted project to a wholly unrelated proposal in a different City Council district (to rename a one-block portion of Tamarind Avenue in honor of L. Ron Hubbard)
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NEWS
December 4, 1997 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jess Bravin and Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme never met, never talked and view each other across a cultural chasm once called "the generation gap." Yet each is intrigued with a question about the same strange moment in recent history. Why, almost 30 years ago, did a cluster of largely middle-class American kids glom onto Charles Manson and commit crimes, including murder, while under his thrall?
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NEWS
December 3, 1997 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jess Bravin and Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme never met, never talked and view each other across a cultural chasm once called "the generation gap." Yet each is intrigued with a question about the same strange moment in recent history. Why, almost 30 years ago, did a cluster of largely middle-class American kids glom onto Charles Manson and commit crimes, including murder, while under his thrall? "Some people are just destined, I think," said Fromme, who, at 49, remains Manson's most loyal disciple, in a phone interview from federal prison in Marianna, Fla., where she is serving a life sentence for the attempted assassination of President Gerald R. Ford.
NEWS
September 22, 1994
As the sponsor of the proposal to create Raymond Chandler Square in Hollywood, I wish to clarify a misperception implied by a recent letter ("Hollywood: Street Name Change Draws Fire," Matthew L. Lesniak, Sept. 4). The letter complained about the spate of street name change proposals in Hollywood, in which a historic name may be pasted over with that of a more recent figure. In the same breath, the letter linked my just-adopted project to a wholly unrelated proposal in a different City Council district (to rename a one-block portion of Tamarind Avenue in honor of L. Ron Hubbard)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1991
Jess Bravin's article "Shylock: The Stereotype Is Still a Problem" (June 5) revealed the vexation caused by the anti-Semitism contained in Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice." Staging this production in today's costumes, as is being done by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and the Old Globe Theatre of San Diego, is a step toward increasing anti-Semitism within our own times, as if there were a lack of it. By bringing this 400-year-old play into modern times, the producers and directors imply that today's Jews are like Shylock and that any punishment is justified.
NEWS
June 10, 1990
Regarding Jess Bravin's story on Joan Rivers in the May 20 edition of TV Times. Bravin quotes Rivers as saying, "I'd like to go to Williamsburg and do Lady Macbeth. . . ." Either Rivers isn't too up on theater or Bravin wrote her quote down wrong. Although Williamsburg, Va., is a lovely town noted for its preserved Colonial atmosphere, to my knowledge there is no famous theater there. I believe the reference was to Williamstown (Mass.), which does have a highly regarded and often celebrity studded summer theater program.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1990
Jess Bravin's comedy review ("Rich Little Makes a Weak Impression," Nov. 13) was "right on target." With an audience composed of citizens who worked diligently to raise funds for some 40 charities, he should be ashamed of his performance. In his rote presentation of "old" material, not once did he seem in contact with his audience. His eyes were closed most of the time. I sincerely doubt he could find a valid excuse for such a dismal performance. Bravin was indeed correct about Julie Budd--she was absolutely marvelous and, in addition, donated funds from the sale of her new album to the buyer's charity choice.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1991
Re: "Grove's Shylock Faces Many Judges" by Jess Bravin (Calendar, June 22): According to Hirsch Goldberg in "Just Because They're Jewish," Shakespeare borrowed the "Merchant of Venice" story line (of the young lovers persecuted by an evil moneylender) from an ancient Roman text. In the original version, the young lovers were pagan, and Shylock was--you guessed it--a Christian. Updating the play for his Christian audiences, Shakespeare naturally "did the right thing" and turned the lovers into Christians and made Shylock a Jew--probably because there weren't any Jews around to complain about defamation of character, having been expelled from England in the 13th Century.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1992
Jess Bravin's story about Mike Love's disaffection with his old friend George Bush was well written and interesting ("Laws of Nature Transcend GOP Ties for Beach Boys," Sept. 12). Unfortunately, it illustrated what many people consider the systematic failure of American journalism to inform. On the basis of Love's prepared cover story, we are told that the Beach Boys want to make the world safe for bikinis and are therefore dissatisfied with Bush's relatively passive performance on environmental issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1996
Jess Bravin's commentary of Nov. 24 misrepresented the phrase "UC Means Business." It is the title of a report that explores the many economic contributions the University of California makes to the state and the nation. It is not about privatizing UC. UC, through its contributions to the state's economy, its job-generating capacity and its research developments, has been instrumental in helping California's recovery from the worst economic recession since the Great Depression. Among the report's findings were: UC generates three times as much money as the state invests in it. The university contributes to local economies, supporting neighborhood retailers, restaurants, hotels, construction firms and other businesses.
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