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Jess J Araujo

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December 9, 1998 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Ricardo Montalban calls his friend Jess J. Araujo's book "a great gift" to the Spanish-speaking community. But the Santa Ana lawyer's book, "The Law and Your Legal Rights: A Bilingual Guide to Everyday Legal Issues" (Fireside; $16), will be useful to anyone seeking basic information about the laws and legal procedures that impact our daily lives.
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NEWS
December 9, 1998 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Ricardo Montalban calls his friend Jess J. Araujo's book "a great gift" to the Spanish-speaking community. But the Santa Ana lawyer's book, "The Law and Your Legal Rights: A Bilingual Guide to Everyday Legal Issues" (Fireside; $16), will be useful to anyone seeking basic information about the laws and legal procedures that impact our daily lives.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1995 | JEFF KASS
A 3-year-old nonprofit organization aiming to combat voter apathy among Latinos raised $20,000 from a recent event, organization President Jess J. Araujo said Tuesday. The Nov. 4 fund-raiser for Latin American Voters of America at the Bowers Museum of Cultural Art in Santa Ana included guests such as actor Ricardo Montalban and was quite successful, Araujo said. "Money-wise, we're very happy." To date, the organization has registered only 170 voters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1995
Attorney Jess J. Araujo has been elected president of the Board of Trustees of the Orange County Bar Foundation, known for its crime-prevention programs for youth. As president, Araujo will oversee the nonprofit foundation's fund-raising and crime-diversion programs for youth, including Programma Shortstop and Legal Education for Youth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1994
A national nonpartisan Latino voter education organization will make its first public appearance Wednesday to begin a membership drive. The public has been invited to attend a dinner reception at the Center Club in Costa Mesa and become members of LAVA, or Latin American Voters of America, a nonprofit group dedicated to providing civic and voter education. LAVA has spent the past two years researching voter trends, demographics and issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1995 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Three years after being founded to boost the involvement of Latinos in politics, a local nonprofit organization has found more apathy than registered voters and has encountered more bureaucratic obstacles than money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1995 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dear Street Smart: I think the public should be aware of a serious accident waiting to happen. A week ago, I had occasion to play golf at the Tustin Ranch Golf Club. There are a number of holes there where an errant shot could easily hit traffic. This fact came to light when a member of my playing group sliced his drive onto Irvine Boulevard, between Jamboree and Tustin Ranch Road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cultural center was officially launched at the Mexican Consulate on Monday, as Latino community leaders applauded the months-long planning that already has brought one nationally acclaimed Mexican artist here to perform. The center will bring knowledge and a much-needed pride in their heritage to local Latino youths, while chipping away at discrimination in Orange County, community leaders said.
NEWS
June 23, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teams of federal immigration agents are knocking on doors, canvassing jails and prisons and hitting job sites nationwide as part of the Clinton administration's unprecedented push to track down and expel immigrants--both illegal and legal--who are subject to deportation. The Immigration and Naturalization Service expects to deport 93,000 people during the current fiscal year--35% more than last year's record pace. One-third of 1997 deportees resided in Southern California.
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the recipient of the UC Irvine Friends of the Library's first Fiction Award in 1966, E.M. (Mick) Nathanson of Laguna Niguel jokes that "I was the only one around, so they grabbed me." Actually, 17 books were submitted in three categories--fiction, nonfiction and juvenile--the first year the library support group honored county authors. And it was Nathanson's novel, "The Dirty Dozen," that the Friends deemed "the most outstanding" in the fiction category.
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