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Jess Mowry

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NEWS
April 10, 1992 | JOHN BOUDREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; John Boudreau is a Bay Area writer
Boys work the parking lot in East Oakland as night falls. They beg Jaguar and Mercedes owners for change to buy a meal. Businessmen walk by on their way to watch the Warriors in the Coliseum. Only Jess Mowry seems to see the kids. He observes their moves from his sagging 1955 GMC truck as he waits outside a Denny's restaurant. "Imagine how much courage it takes to do that hour after hour; approach somebody and do that little humble thing and get refused, or get cursed," he says to a companion.
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BOOKS
November 7, 1993 | Bob Sipchen, Bob Sipchen is a Times staff writer and the author of "Baby Insane and the Buddha" (Doubleday), the true story of a police detective who persuades a young street gangster to bust his violent homeboys.
The Reverend Jesse Jackson and novelist Jess Mowry have both confronted a perplexing modern truth. "More black men die each year from guns than the total who died from lynching," Jackson has said, calling upon young African Americans to break the unwritten code of silence that prevents "snitching" on the bullies who plague inner cities. Few characters in Mowry's powerful third novel, "Six Out Seven," are likely to heed Jackson's call. But Mowry does grapple angrily and honestly with the forces killing young black men; with individual and societal responsibility; with the complexities of modern racism, including drive-by shooters who, Mowry says, roam inner cities "like the KKK's Afro-American auxiliary."
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BOOKS
April 19, 1992 | Robert Ward, Ward's new novel, "The King of Cards," will be published by Pocket Books in January 1993.
"Way Past Cool" is a gut- wrenching, heart- breaking suspense novel about black gang life in Oakland. The author, Jess Mowry, is a terrific, visceral writer. This book crackles with authenticity, a wonderful sense of place that makes the story all the more disturbing. Like Hubert Selby's "Last Exit to Brooklyn," or Warren Miller's great novel "Harlem" (a book that should be in print permanently), Mowry's book is a report from the front lines of George Bush's America.
BOOKS
April 19, 1992 | Robert Ward, Ward's new novel, "The King of Cards," will be published by Pocket Books in January 1993.
"Way Past Cool" is a gut- wrenching, heart- breaking suspense novel about black gang life in Oakland. The author, Jess Mowry, is a terrific, visceral writer. This book crackles with authenticity, a wonderful sense of place that makes the story all the more disturbing. Like Hubert Selby's "Last Exit to Brooklyn," or Warren Miller's great novel "Harlem" (a book that should be in print permanently), Mowry's book is a report from the front lines of George Bush's America.
BOOKS
November 7, 1993 | Bob Sipchen, Bob Sipchen is a Times staff writer and the author of "Baby Insane and the Buddha" (Doubleday), the true story of a police detective who persuades a young street gangster to bust his violent homeboys.
The Reverend Jesse Jackson and novelist Jess Mowry have both confronted a perplexing modern truth. "More black men die each year from guns than the total who died from lynching," Jackson has said, calling upon young African Americans to break the unwritten code of silence that prevents "snitching" on the bullies who plague inner cities. Few characters in Mowry's powerful third novel, "Six Out Seven," are likely to heed Jackson's call. But Mowry does grapple angrily and honestly with the forces killing young black men; with individual and societal responsibility; with the complexities of modern racism, including drive-by shooters who, Mowry says, roam inner cities "like the KKK's Afro-American auxiliary."
NEWS
June 15, 1992 | IRENE LACHER
The recent surge in books and films examining the harsh realities of ghetto life has most notably included black filmmakers like Spike Lee and John Singleton, who have enjoyed boffo box office returns and the good graces of Hollywood. (Last year 19 movies were made by black filmmakers, more than the entire decade before). Also: * Edward James Olmos' recent film, "American Me," looked at gang life from the Latino perspective.
BOOKS
August 19, 2001 | THOMAS CURWEN, Thomas Curwen is deputy editor of Book Review
He stood trial for a murder. He was 14 at the time of the crime. Two years later, he still looked every bit the child, dressed in a clean white shirt one size too large. Black hair slicked back, eyes deep-set, he wore a sheepish, puzzled expression, and it took us less than a week to convict him. We were the jury, 12 men and women who knew nothing about his life because his life was inadmissible. Then I read Sandro Meallet's novel "Edgewater Angels," and some of the blanks filled in.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's the salesman's best pitch: "Invest now, and you'll have enough for your kids to go to college." Who could say no? What parents don't want diplomas for their children? With all the noise about the need for higher education, who dares dream that a child can succeed without benefit of a degree? And what are the alternatives anyway? Sure, some have climbed to the top without that degree.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | JOHN BOUDREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; John Boudreau is a Bay Area writer
Boys work the parking lot in East Oakland as night falls. They beg Jaguar and Mercedes owners for change to buy a meal. Businessmen walk by on their way to watch the Warriors in the Coliseum. Only Jess Mowry seems to see the kids. He observes their moves from his sagging 1955 GMC truck as he waits outside a Denny's restaurant. "Imagine how much courage it takes to do that hour after hour; approach somebody and do that little humble thing and get refused, or get cursed," he says to a companion.
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