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Jesse A Brewer

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jesse A. Brewer, a Los Angeles Police Department assistant chief who became a force for reform of the embattled LAPD in the wake of the beating of Rodney G. King, died Sunday. He was 74. Brewer died of heart failure at 5 a.m. at the Hospital of the Good Samaritan, an LAPD spokesman said. When he retired in 1991 after 39 years of service, Brewer was the highest-ranking African American in the history of the LAPD.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1998 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A slice of Exposition Park that was once an asphalt parking lot enclosed by chain-link fence and barbed wire was dedicated Wednesday as Jesse A. Brewer Jr. Park. City and state officials paid tribute to Brewer, who broke through racial barriers in the Los Angeles Police Department and remained a faithful public servant in a variety of roles throughout his life.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1992
Jesse A. Brewer, a retired Los Angeles Police Department assistant chief, was named president of the Police Commission Tuesday during the five-member panel's annual rotation of officers. Brewer, who was appointed to the commission in July, 1991, was unanimously chosen by his colleagues to take over the president's seat from Stanley K. Sheinbaum, who will remain on the commission. Attorney Michael Yamaki was chosen vice president, replacing Brewer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1997
In a quiet ceremony attended by more than 250 people, the Los Angeles Police Department formally dedicated the newly remodeled 77th Division in honor of late Assistant Chief Jesse Brewer. The Jesse Brewer Regional Police Facility was named after the man who was the highest-ranking African American in the history of the LAPD when he retired in 1991 after 39 years of service. Brewer died Nov. 19, 1995, of heart failure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1992
Police Commissioners Stanley K. Sheinbaum and Jesse A. Brewer, two of outgoing Police Chief Daryl F. Gates' harshest critics, departed from the usual verbal warfare Tuesday at the last commission meeting before Gates retires and commended him for his years of service and department loyalty. Brewer, a retired assistant police chief, cited Gates' innovations and creativity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1998 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A slice of Exposition Park that was once an asphalt parking lot enclosed by chain-link fence and barbed wire was dedicated Wednesday as Jesse A. Brewer Jr. Park. City and state officials paid tribute to Brewer, who broke through racial barriers in the Los Angeles Police Department and remained a faithful public servant in a variety of roles throughout his life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1996
The Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to name the Los Angeles Police Department's new 77th Street police station in honor of Jesse Brewer, the late assistant chief of police. No police station in the city has ever been named for an individual. Brewer, the highest-ranking African American officer in the history of the LAPD when he retired in 1991 after 39 years on the force, died in November at age 74. Known for his integrity, Brewer was widely respected throughout the city.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | Times researcher Cecilia Rasmussen
Police officials who appeared before the Christopher Commission included: Daryl F. Gates, Police Chief Born: Aug. 30, 1926, in Glendale. Education: Graduated from USC in 1950 with a BS degree in public administration; in 1965 completed one year of graduate study there. Career: Joined force in 1949 after serving two years in the Navy in the South Pacific. Rose through ranks from sergeant to assistant chief in 14 years. Succeeded Chief Edward M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In unusually pointed remarks, retired Police Commission President Jesse A. Brewer has criticized Mayor Richard Riordan for pledging to increase the department's ranks by 3,000 officers in four years, a promise that Brewer described as "very impossible" to achieve. Brewer also leveled criticism at Deputy Mayor William C. Violante, a former police union president and one of Riordan's first appointees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1987 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Police Department's first black deputy chief, Jesse A. Brewer, was promoted Thursday to assistant chief, a move heralded by other black officers as a major step toward affirmative action within the LAPD. Chief Daryl F. Gates, however, told reporters that his selection of Brewer over two more senior deputy chief candidates had nothing to do with his race. "This is not an affirmative action selection," Gates said. "Jesse Brewer has a record that is almost too good.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1996
The Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to name the Los Angeles Police Department's new 77th Street police station in honor of Jesse Brewer, the late assistant chief of police. No police station in the city has ever been named for an individual. Brewer, the highest-ranking African American officer in the history of the LAPD when he retired in 1991 after 39 years on the force, died in November at age 74. Known for his integrity, Brewer was widely respected throughout the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jesse A. Brewer, a Los Angeles Police Department assistant chief who became a force for reform of the embattled LAPD in the wake of the beating of Rodney G. King, died Sunday. He was 74. Brewer died of heart failure at 5 a.m. at the Hospital of the Good Samaritan, an LAPD spokesman said. When he retired in 1991 after 39 years of service, Brewer was the highest-ranking African American in the history of the LAPD.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In unusually pointed remarks, retired Police Commission President Jesse A. Brewer has criticized Mayor Richard Riordan for pledging to increase the department's ranks by 3,000 officers in four years, a promise that Brewer described as "very impossible" to achieve. Brewer also leveled criticism at Deputy Mayor William C. Violante, a former police union president and one of Riordan's first appointees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1992
Jesse A. Brewer, a retired Los Angeles Police Department assistant chief, was named president of the Police Commission Tuesday during the five-member panel's annual rotation of officers. Brewer, who was appointed to the commission in July, 1991, was unanimously chosen by his colleagues to take over the president's seat from Stanley K. Sheinbaum, who will remain on the commission. Attorney Michael Yamaki was chosen vice president, replacing Brewer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1992
Police Commissioners Stanley K. Sheinbaum and Jesse A. Brewer, two of outgoing Police Chief Daryl F. Gates' harshest critics, departed from the usual verbal warfare Tuesday at the last commission meeting before Gates retires and commended him for his years of service and department loyalty. Brewer, a retired assistant police chief, cited Gates' innovations and creativity.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Igniting a full-scale war of words that has been building for months, an unrestrained Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl F. Gates on Monday said he was only bluffing when he threatened to prolong his stay on the job--even though he believes a bunch of "crummy little politicians" are endangering the department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired Assistant Police Chief Jesse A. Brewer, who strongly criticized the department's upper management while testifying before the Christopher Commission, was unanimously confirmed by the City Council on Wednesday to serve on the Police Commission. The newest member of the civilian panel, which oversees the force, said in an interview that he will call for an audit of the Police Department aimed at putting "the maximum number of people possible in the field."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As he stood before a room packed with reporters, Jesse A. Brewer--once a top Los Angeles Police Department official and now a nominee for the Police Commission--was asked the inevitable: How would he get along with his old boss, Chief Daryl F. Gates, a man he recently criticized before the Christopher Commission? "The only thing I can say," Brewer replied, "is that Chief Gates and I have been very close for three years. We work very well together, very cooperatively.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired Assistant Police Chief Jesse A. Brewer, who strongly criticized the department's upper management while testifying before the Christopher Commission, was unanimously confirmed by the City Council on Wednesday to serve on the Police Commission. The newest member of the civilian panel, which oversees the force, said in an interview that he will call for an audit of the Police Department aimed at putting "the maximum number of people possible in the field."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking the first step in implementing one of the Christopher Commission's most dramatic reforms, a key Los Angeles City Council committee on Wednesday unanimously endorsed holding a special election early next year for voters to decide on how the city's future police chiefs will be hired and fired. "We're on our way," said Councilman Joel Wachs, who has championed the speedy adoption of reforms contained in the Christopher Commission report.
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