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Jesse Spencer

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005 | Susan King
Growing up in Melbourne, Australia, Jesse Spencer loved to swim freestyle and the breaststroke. "Swimming is very close to the national psyche," explains the engaging 25-year-old. "It is really rare to meet an Australian who doesn't swim." In the Australian import "Swimming Upstream," which opened Friday, Spencer plays a famous 1950s Australian backstroke champion named Tony Fingleton. "When I read the script for this film, I thought, 'This is great,' because it's swimming," Spencer says.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2013 | By Richard Winton
An attorney for the porn actor "Mr. Marcus," who hid the fact he tested positive for syphilis, said his client pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor charge of exposing another to a communicable disease to get out of jail. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Catherine Ewell sentenced Jesse Spencer on Tuesday to 30 days in jail, 15 days of community service and three years probation. At the time of the sentencing, Spencer was being held on $200,000 bail for suspicion of drunk driving.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2013 | By Richard Winton
An attorney for the porn actor "Mr. Marcus," who hid the fact he tested positive for syphilis, said his client pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor charge of exposing another to a communicable disease to get out of jail. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Catherine Ewell sentenced Jesse Spencer on Tuesday to 30 days in jail, 15 days of community service and three years probation. At the time of the sentencing, Spencer was being held on $200,000 bail for suspicion of drunk driving.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Dick Wolf, the man behind the globally successful "Law & Order" family of television shows, has fared less well when straying from his practically patented formula (and, for that matter, from New York City as a background). But when you are known for doing one thing well, it is always tempting to prove yourself capable of doing another. In "Chicago Fire," Wolf tries on a new city and a new setting. Created by Michael Brandt and Derek Haas ("2 Fast 2 Furious") and premiering Wednesday on NBC, the "Law & Order" network, it is set in a Chicago firehouse - with a nice skyline view from the driveway - where various factions cooperate and compete and get together for a beer at the end of the day. It begins, as is often the case with such stories, with a teammate's death.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Dick Wolf, the man behind the globally successful "Law & Order" family of television shows, has fared less well when straying from his practically patented formula (and, for that matter, from New York City as a background). But when you are known for doing one thing well, it is always tempting to prove yourself capable of doing another. In "Chicago Fire," Wolf tries on a new city and a new setting. Created by Michael Brandt and Derek Haas ("2 Fast 2 Furious") and premiering Wednesday on NBC, the "Law & Order" network, it is set in a Chicago firehouse - with a nice skyline view from the driveway - where various factions cooperate and compete and get together for a beer at the end of the day. It begins, as is often the case with such stories, with a teammate's death.
HEALTH
January 25, 2010 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
"House M.D." Fox, Jan. 11 Episode: "The Down Low" The premise Mickey (Ethan Embry) is conducting a drug deal when he suddenly drops to the ground and hits his head. In the hospital, he experiences noise-induced vertigo and blacks out again from the noise of Dr. Gregory House's (Hugh Laurie's) cane tapping. House thinks this could all be due to cocaine, especially when Mickey has a seizure during a hearing test. Mickey insists on leaving the hospital but then returns with a high fever, subsequently undergoing a lumbar puncture that shows nothing amiss.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2012 | by Greg Braxton
Dick Wolf is known primarily for developing the "Law & Order" franchise. But with his series "Chicago Fire,"  Wolf is moving from the cool of the courtroom to the heat of infernos fought by dedicated Chicago firefighters. Just don't call "Chicago Fire"a procedural that will spotlight weekly fires and rescues. Wolf describes the series as an intense, character-driven drama that is a bit of a throwback to big-scale event TV. "This is not the fire of the week," Wolf said during a session about the NBC series at the TCA Press Tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
There is something unnerving about watching Brittany Murphy portray a kooky, klutzy daughter of a deceased rock legend in "Uptown Girls." Director Boaz Yakin has her constantly going over the top and flailing about in all directions in a misguided attempt at madcap comedy. Murphy, who looks like she could use a good rest, strives mightily to accommodate him but ends up seeming merely strained when she's supposed to come across as irresistibly charming despite her character's erratic ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2012
SERIES The Voice: Blind auditions for this unscripted singing competition continue (8 p.m. NBC). House: Chase (Jesse Spencer) forges a bond with the team's latest patient (Julie Mond), a cloistered nun who is about to take her final vows in this new episode (8 p.m. Fox). The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills: The troubled unscripted series reunion episodes continue at 8 and 9 8 p.m. on Bravo. Undercover Boss: Abroad: The American series goes international premiering with David Clarke on an undercover mission to examine the inner workings of Best Western (9 p.m. TLC)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week of Jan. 6-12, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SERIES Whitney: In the course of trying to figure out what's aggravating Alex's (Chris D'Elia) allergies, Whitney (Whitney Cummings) discloses that she's had a heart problem since childhood. Zoe Lister-Jones, Dan O'Brien and Rhea Seehorn also star in this new episode (8 p.m. NBC). Law & Order: Special Victims Unit: When a Suffolk county prosecutor (Jane Kaczmarek)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005 | Susan King
Growing up in Melbourne, Australia, Jesse Spencer loved to swim freestyle and the breaststroke. "Swimming is very close to the national psyche," explains the engaging 25-year-old. "It is really rare to meet an Australian who doesn't swim." In the Australian import "Swimming Upstream," which opened Friday, Spencer plays a famous 1950s Australian backstroke champion named Tony Fingleton. "When I read the script for this film, I thought, 'This is great,' because it's swimming," Spencer says.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2005
"Swimming Upstream" arrives in U.S. theaters Friday nearly two years after the Australian drama was released Down Under. Aussie heartthrob Jesse Spencer (currently a regular on the Fox medical series "House") stars in the true, inspirational tale of backstroke champion Tony Fingleton. Geoffrey Rush plays his abusive, alcoholic father, who ignored Tony most of his life, and Judy Davis is his emotionally fragile mother.
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