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Jesse W Moore

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February 6, 1987 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
Jesse W. Moore, the space agency official with final authority for the fatal launching of the shuttle Challenger last year, resigned Thursday to take a job in private industry. The announcement of his departure, effective Monday, came a little more than a year after the disaster rocked the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and brought the U.S. space program to a standstill, and it apparently ended a massive turnover in the agency's top management.
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NEWS
February 6, 1987 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
Jesse W. Moore, the space agency official with final authority for the fatal launching of the shuttle Challenger last year, resigned Thursday to take a job in private industry. The announcement of his departure, effective Monday, came a little more than a year after the disaster rocked the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and brought the U.S. space program to a standstill, and it apparently ended a massive turnover in the agency's top management.
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NEWS
February 25, 1986 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
NASA's new shuttle program director, vowing to make the space agency "a forthcoming, public institution," arrived here Monday to be briefed on the agency's internal investigation of the Challenger explosion. Former astronaut Richard H. Truly, who replaced Jesse W. Moore last week as associate administrator for space flight, said that he is "keenly aware of the depth of public interest and concern about our efforts to understand and respond to the causes of the accident."
NEWS
February 9, 1986 | United Press International
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was warned last year that a shuttle catastrophe could occur because of possible trouble with critical seals in the space shuttle's solid-fuel rocket boosters, the New York Times reported in today's editions. Space agency documents reportedly showed that engineers at NASA headquarters and at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., were concerned that leaks could develop where seals join booster fuel segments, the newspaper said.
NEWS
February 20, 1986 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
A House subcommittee Wednesday demanded the release of a classified analysis of two space shuttle missions once scheduled for May, suggesting that Energy Department and NASA officials have neglected safety concerns in their haste to launch nuclear-powered satellites. In a lengthy letter to Energy Secretary John S. Herrington, Rep. Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
The chief of NASA's embattled shuttle program said Wednesday that he agrees with the sweeping recommendations laid down earlier this week at the end of a four-month investigation of the Challenger tragedy. "As far as I am concerned, this is a great road map to get started with, and I am in agreement with it," Rear Adm. Richard H. Truly told the House Science and Technology Committee.
NEWS
June 13, 1986 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
The White House was preparing a directive Thursday that will tell the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to comply with the recommendations of the presidential commission that investigated the Challenger accident and call for major changes in space agency management.
NEWS
February 21, 1986 | GAYLORD SHAW, Times Staff Writer
Rear Adm. Richard H. Truly, a former astronaut, Thursday took command of the nation's beleaguered space shuttle program as well as NASA's internal investigation of the Challenger explosion, vowing "to get to the bottom of this" by unraveling "a long chain of events" that, he said, he suspects caused the disaster. "If nobody else does it, I will," said Truly, who flew two shuttle missions before becoming head of the Naval Space Command in 1983. "I wouldn't be . . .
NEWS
March 1, 1986 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Key NASA officials who could have stopped the space shuttle Challenger from roaring aloft defended their launch decision methods Friday while attempting to diminish the credibility of engineers who warned of a possible catastrophe at liftoff.
NEWS
July 29, 1985 | ROBERT A. JONES, Times Staff Writer
Space agency officials said preparations were proceeding smoothly for NASA's second attempt this month to launch the space shuttle Challenger, which today was to begin its seven-day mission to conduct a series of astronomical and atmospheric experiments. "We've got a green light for launch," shuttle program director Jesse W. Moore said of the scheduled liftoff at 12:23 p.m. PDT. "This mission, I think, is going to yield an enormous amount of science to the program."
NEWS
February 11, 1986 | PETER H. KING, Times Staff Writer
Documents pertaining to erosion of the seals joining the segments of solid rocket boosters on the space shuttle were delivered Monday to the presidential commission investigating the disastrous Challenger explosion. Jesse W. Moore, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration official who heads the shuttle program, brought a 1 1/2-inch thick stack of documents to the commission for a private briefing.
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