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Jesse White

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NEWS
January 10, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jesse White, veteran character actor and comedian best remembered for his 22-year commercial stint as the idle and bored Maytag repairman, died Thursday. He was 79. White died after complications of surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, said his daughter, Carole White Ita. In the popular Maytag commercials, White humorously made the point that the washing machines rarely--if ever--needed repair, making his job unbearably dull. "He was a real Joe and that is why people loved him.
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NEWS
January 10, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jesse White, veteran character actor and comedian best remembered for his 22-year commercial stint as the idle and bored Maytag repairman, died Thursday. He was 79. White died after complications of surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, said his daughter, Carole White Ita. In the popular Maytag commercials, White humorously made the point that the washing machines rarely--if ever--needed repair, making his job unbearably dull. "He was a real Joe and that is why people loved him.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Jesse White, best known as the desperately lonely Maytag repairman in television commercials, has had enough solitude. "There's only so much loneliness a guy can take," White said in announcing his retirement as the appliance company's spokesman. Gordon Jump, best known as Mr. Carlson from his days on "WKRP in Cincinnati," will replace White as Maytag's new lonely guy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1990 | JON NALICK
Nine-year-old Jesse White wears his blue-and-yellow football uniform with pride. Like the other members of the Fullerton Cobras, he likes to show off his "stick marks," those splotches of color left on a helmet after it smashes into an opponent's helmet. He has only a few now because it is his first year playing for the Cobras, but he is eager to earn more. But unlike his teammates, he can't hear the cheers of the crowd, or the grunt of an opposing football player he tackles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1990 | JON NALICK
Nine-year-old Jesse White wears his blue-and-yellow football uniform with pride. Like the other members of the Fullerton Cobras, he likes to show off his "stick marks," those splotches of color left on a helmet after it smashes into an opponent's helmet. He has only a few now because it is his first year playing for the Cobras, but he is eager to earn more. But unlike his teammates, he can't hear the cheers of the crowd, or the grunt of an opposing football player he tackles.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1989
Jesse Jackson, viewing for the first time the controversial painting that depicts him as a blond, blue-eyed white man, said Sunday, "It's not the picture that's the insult. It's the reality behind the picture: That's the insult." The portrait, entitled "How Ya Like Me Now?" by artist David Hammons and part of the Washington Project for the Arts "The Blues Aesthetic" exhibition, was placed on a street corner Wednesday evening.
NEWS
February 28, 1988
Five people have been charged in Fresno with embezzling $500,000 from Gottschalk's department stores by setting up phony equipment and supply firms and billing Gottschalk's for undelivered materials. Fresno police identified Charles Glaze, 54, of San Diego, a former general superintendent for Gottschalk's, as the mastermind of the scheme. Glaze's girlfriend, Vanessa Bridgeforth, 34, is accused of aiding in the scheme.
NATIONAL
January 7, 2009 | Mike Dorning
Roland Burris gained a powerful ally in his bid to replace President-elect Barack Obama on Tuesday when Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California urged the Senate to seat him, arguing that his appointment was lawful. Her stance could strengthen Burris' position as he meets with Senate leaders today. Burris, appointed by embattled Illinois Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich, came to the Capitol to be sworn in with other senators Tuesday but was barred from the Senate floor.
NEWS
April 2, 1999 | From Associated Press
Illinois officials said Thursday they will suspend the commercial driver's license of the trucker involved in last month's deadly Amtrak collision. John R. Stokes, 58, will lose his truck-driving privileges for two months starting in June, said Secretary of State Jesse White. Keeping Stokes from driving a truck, even for 60 days, will "no doubt" make Illinois roads safer, White said.
NEWS
March 26, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The head of the federal agency investigating last week's deadly collision between an Amtrak train and a steel-laden semitrailer said Thursday that evidence suggests the truck driver started into the railroad crossing after warning lights began to flash. An attorney for the truck driver, John R. Stokes, has said his client did not cause the March 15 crash 50 miles south of Chicago by attempting to go around crossing gates and beat the oncoming train.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1989
Jesse Jackson, viewing for the first time the controversial painting that depicts him as a blond, blue-eyed white man, said Sunday, "It's not the picture that's the insult. It's the reality behind the picture: That's the insult." The portrait, entitled "How Ya Like Me Now?" by artist David Hammons and part of the Washington Project for the Arts "The Blues Aesthetic" exhibition, was placed on a street corner Wednesday evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Jesse White, best known as the desperately lonely Maytag repairman in television commercials, has had enough solitude. "There's only so much loneliness a guy can take," White said in announcing his retirement as the appliance company's spokesman. Gordon Jump, best known as Mr. Carlson from his days on "WKRP in Cincinnati," will replace White as Maytag's new lonely guy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Gordon Jump, the avuncular television actor best remembered as "the Big Guy" boss Arthur Carlson in the television series "WKRP in Cincinnati," and as "Ol' Lonely," the hapless repairman with nothing to do on Maytag commercials, has died. He was 71. Jump, according to his family, suffered from pulmonary fibrosis, which causes scarring of the air sacs in the lungs, leading to heart or respiratory failure. He died Monday at his home in Coto de Caza.
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