Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJessi Colter
IN THE NEWS

Jessi Colter

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Country singer and songwriter Tompall Glaser, a member of country's “outlaw” movement of the 1970s, has died after a long illness, his nephew Louis Glaser has told the Associated Press. He was 79. An associate of Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings and Kris Kristofferson, Glaser never achieved the stardom accorded his fellow outlaws, but was a part of country music history for his role on the 1976 album “Wanted! The Outlaws,” which featured tracks by Glaser, Nelson, Jennings and Jessi Colter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Country singer and songwriter Tompall Glaser, a member of country's “outlaw” movement of the 1970s, has died after a long illness, his nephew Louis Glaser has told the Associated Press. He was 79. An associate of Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings and Kris Kristofferson, Glaser never achieved the stardom accorded his fellow outlaws, but was a part of country music history for his role on the 1976 album “Wanted! The Outlaws,” which featured tracks by Glaser, Nelson, Jennings and Jessi Colter.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1986 | ROBERT HILBURN
Waylon Jennings is thankful for a second chance. After establishing himself in the '70s as one of the most dynamic figures ever in country music, Jennings all but destroyed his singing voice because of prolonged cocaine use, he acknowledges. His voice was in such bad shape a couple of years ago that a friend, who once worked with Jennings and remains a big fan, was moved to tears when she heard him in concert here. And Jennings wasn't just having problems on stage and in the recording studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2006 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
Ask country singer Jessi Colter where she has found salvation and she might describe the cowboy congregation at her church, a wood-frame chapel that backs up to the mountains north of Scottsdale, Ariz. But she might just as well rattle off the names of her favorite L.A. bars, such as Molly Malone's and Malibu Inn, because "the streets can be about salvation too, and they can be an awful lot of fun."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2006 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
Ask country singer Jessi Colter where she has found salvation and she might describe the cowboy congregation at her church, a wood-frame chapel that backs up to the mountains north of Scottsdale, Ariz. But she might just as well rattle off the names of her favorite L.A. bars, such as Molly Malone's and Malibu Inn, because "the streets can be about salvation too, and they can be an awful lot of fun."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2003 | Robert Hilburn, Times Staff Writer
Rosanne CASH tells a sweet, revealing story about her stepmother, June Carter Cash, in the liner notes of the latter's warm, posthumous "Wildwood Flower" album, which will be released Tuesday. It seems the pair was at home a few years ago when the living room phone rang. June answered it and became so engrossed in conversation that Rosanne finally went into the kitchen. "I just had the nicest conversation," June said after rejoining Rosanne half an hour later.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Their absence from a southern Missouri concert in 1985--allegedly because of weather-related travel problems--has cost country music singers Waylon Jennings and Jessi Colter nearly $35,000. A federal court jury deliberated less than an hour before ordering the husband-and-wife duo to pay damages to two promoters. Jennings and Colter testified that they missed the concert in Noel, Mo.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Highwaymen--country music stars Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash and Kris Kristofferson--arrived at their concert with more than 80 tons of food in tow to give to the area's needy. "We waste food in this country," Jennings said. Jennings and his wife, singer-songwriter Jessi Colter, praised the hunger-relief organization Feed the Children in collecting the food and urged concert-goers to donate more canned goods.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1996 | ROBERT HILBURN
In 1976 this compilation seemed a rather carelessly designed overview of country music's immensely valuable outlaw movement, but it holds a special place in the heart of Nashville because it was the first country album to sell 2 million. For this update, RCA has taken the 11 original tracks (including music by Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Jessi Colter and Tompall Glaser) and added nine more recordings from the same period. In addition, Jennings and Nelson recorded Steve Earle's "Nowhere Road."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1987 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Half-an-hour before the first show of his three-night solo run at the Westwood Playhouse, country singer Waylon Jennings ambled through the lobby and chatted amiably with the stunned concert-goers. This casually warm gesture set the tone for the evening. The 50-year-old Jennings is known as a straight-shooting country rebel.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2003 | Robert Hilburn, Times Staff Writer
Rosanne CASH tells a sweet, revealing story about her stepmother, June Carter Cash, in the liner notes of the latter's warm, posthumous "Wildwood Flower" album, which will be released Tuesday. It seems the pair was at home a few years ago when the living room phone rang. June answered it and became so engrossed in conversation that Rosanne finally went into the kitchen. "I just had the nicest conversation," June said after rejoining Rosanne half an hour later.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1986 | ROBERT HILBURN
Waylon Jennings is thankful for a second chance. After establishing himself in the '70s as one of the most dynamic figures ever in country music, Jennings all but destroyed his singing voice because of prolonged cocaine use, he acknowledges. His voice was in such bad shape a couple of years ago that a friend, who once worked with Jennings and remains a big fan, was moved to tears when she heard him in concert here. And Jennings wasn't just having problems on stage and in the recording studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1986 | ROBERT HILBURN
Waylon Jennings doesn't have the aching vocal character of George Jones, but his voice offers the best blend of character and dynamics of any country singer of his generation. After an artistic dry spell, the veteran vocalist has changed record labels and seemingly regained his touch. There are too many uninvolving songs and anonymous arrangements for his new LP to be a triumph, but the best numbers worked well Saturday night at the Universal Amphitheatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1987 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Waylon Jennings can still pack more vitality into a performance than nearly any singer you would care to name, even during a set as succinct as his one-hour first show Monday at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano. One of country music's original outlaws, Jennings obviously delights in turning concert cliches inside out. Like his longtime associate Willie Nelson, the Texan brings on stage with him a larger-than-life image.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|