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Jessica Brown Findlay

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Topless scene regret? Jessica Brown Findlay has a few. The former "Downton Abbey" star recently opened up to Radio Times about her first-ever topless scene, in the 2011 film, "Albatross. " The film was the 23-year-old actress' first starring role, and she was cast in it before she became an international star with "Downton Abbey. " Of her topless scenes in the film, she says, "To be honest, 'Albatross' was naivete and not knowing that I could say no.. I had no idea what was going to happen and thought I was going to be shot from behind.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Winter's Tale" is so obviously a passion project, so much a labor of love for industry veteran Akiva Goldsman, that you'd like to be able to say it's a complete success. It isn't, but the parts that do succeed, especially the fervor between stars Colin Farrell and Jessica Brown Findlay, provide such lush, emotional magic that unabashed romantics will be pleased. Co-produced, written and directed by Goldsman, "Winter's Tale" has been drastically pared from Mark Helprin's nearly 700-page 1983 literary blockbuster.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
You might not peg the guy who wrote "I, Robot" and adapted "The Da Vinci Code" as a self-described "shameless romantic. " But then, when looking back on "A Beautiful Mind," the movie that won him a screenplay Oscar, Akiva Goldsman remembers it as a "promise that love conquers all. " So when Goldsman says that he likes to see the world as "a grown-up fairy tale where nothing is without purpose," it makes perfect sense that 30 years ago, riding the...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
You might not peg the guy who wrote "I, Robot" and adapted "The Da Vinci Code" as a self-described "shameless romantic. " But then, when looking back on "A Beautiful Mind," the movie that won him a screenplay Oscar, Akiva Goldsman remembers it as a "promise that love conquers all. " So when Goldsman says that he likes to see the world as "a grown-up fairy tale where nothing is without purpose," it makes perfect sense that 30 years ago, riding the...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
“Downton Abbey" is going to look quite different when it returns for a fourth season. On Friday Siobhan Finneran -- better known to fans as O'Brien, Lady Grantham's constantly scheming, severely coiffed maid -- confirmed that she is leaving the beloved costume drama. Finneran follows co-stars Dan Stevens and Jessica Brown Findlay out the door, though it seems likely her character will do so under less tragic circumstances than theirs: In the Season 3 finale, O'Brien was jockeying hard for a new job that would allow her to see more of the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
“Downton Abbey” fans, start polishing the silver and dusting off those morning suits: The dishy costume drama will return to PBS on Jan. 5. That means devoted viewers will have to wait 235 days to find out how the Crawley family is coping in the wake of dear Cousin Matthew's death -- that is, assuming they're able to avoid the rampant online spoilers that are destined to follow the series' broadcast this fall in the U.K.  “Masterpiece” executive...
NATIONAL
February 19, 2013 | By David Horsey
Another season of "Downton Abbey" has swiftly gone by, and those of us who are fans deserve a break. The tragic death of one character -- Lady Sybil -- was hard enough to take, but when the final episode concluded with the upright Matthew Crawley dying in a car wreck reminiscent of the opening scene in "Lawrence of Arabia," it was simply too much manipulation of our tender heartstrings. We need some time to grieve while the writers concoct new twists in a storyline that had tied up most of the loose ends at the close of Season 3. I confess I'll not miss Matthew all that much.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The many-chambered, highly peopled country house known as "Downton Abbey" opens again Sunday for visitors — that's you, I'm being metaphorical — returning for a second season under the umbrella of PBS series "Masterpiece Classic. " It is classic not for being based on some famous old book — it is an original work for television, created by Julian Fellowes ("Gosford Park") — but because it is a period piece set in a world we associate with famous old books and, in a secondary way, with "Masterpiece Theater" itself, home of the similar, chronologically overlapping "Upstairs, Downstairs" and the primary domestic expression of the Anglo-American "special relationship," television branch, since 1971.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Randee Dawn
TV drama writers are murderers. They have to be: No matter how successful their shows are, at some point, somebody's going to die - and they're going to make that happen. On "Downton Abbey" this season, two major characters died within just a few episodes of one another. "Homeland" killed off the vice president. And "The Walking Dead" kills major and minor characters on a regular basis - sometimes more than once (if they rise from the dead, you understand). But don't think it's easy to kill, even in fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Winter's Tale" is so obviously a passion project, so much a labor of love for industry veteran Akiva Goldsman, that you'd like to be able to say it's a complete success. It isn't, but the parts that do succeed, especially the fervor between stars Colin Farrell and Jessica Brown Findlay, provide such lush, emotional magic that unabashed romantics will be pleased. Co-produced, written and directed by Goldsman, "Winter's Tale" has been drastically pared from Mark Helprin's nearly 700-page 1983 literary blockbuster.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Randee Dawn
TV drama writers are murderers. They have to be: No matter how successful their shows are, at some point, somebody's going to die - and they're going to make that happen. On "Downton Abbey" this season, two major characters died within just a few episodes of one another. "Homeland" killed off the vice president. And "The Walking Dead" kills major and minor characters on a regular basis - sometimes more than once (if they rise from the dead, you understand). But don't think it's easy to kill, even in fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
“Downton Abbey” fans, start polishing the silver and dusting off those morning suits: The dishy costume drama will return to PBS on Jan. 5. That means devoted viewers will have to wait 235 days to find out how the Crawley family is coping in the wake of dear Cousin Matthew's death -- that is, assuming they're able to avoid the rampant online spoilers that are destined to follow the series' broadcast this fall in the U.K.  “Masterpiece” executive...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Topless scene regret? Jessica Brown Findlay has a few. The former "Downton Abbey" star recently opened up to Radio Times about her first-ever topless scene, in the 2011 film, "Albatross. " The film was the 23-year-old actress' first starring role, and she was cast in it before she became an international star with "Downton Abbey. " Of her topless scenes in the film, she says, "To be honest, 'Albatross' was naivete and not knowing that I could say no.. I had no idea what was going to happen and thought I was going to be shot from behind.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
“Downton Abbey" is going to look quite different when it returns for a fourth season. On Friday Siobhan Finneran -- better known to fans as O'Brien, Lady Grantham's constantly scheming, severely coiffed maid -- confirmed that she is leaving the beloved costume drama. Finneran follows co-stars Dan Stevens and Jessica Brown Findlay out the door, though it seems likely her character will do so under less tragic circumstances than theirs: In the Season 3 finale, O'Brien was jockeying hard for a new job that would allow her to see more of the world.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2013 | By David Horsey
Another season of "Downton Abbey" has swiftly gone by, and those of us who are fans deserve a break. The tragic death of one character -- Lady Sybil -- was hard enough to take, but when the final episode concluded with the upright Matthew Crawley dying in a car wreck reminiscent of the opening scene in "Lawrence of Arabia," it was simply too much manipulation of our tender heartstrings. We need some time to grieve while the writers concoct new twists in a storyline that had tied up most of the loose ends at the close of Season 3. I confess I'll not miss Matthew all that much.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The many-chambered, highly peopled country house known as "Downton Abbey" opens again Sunday for visitors — that's you, I'm being metaphorical — returning for a second season under the umbrella of PBS series "Masterpiece Classic. " It is classic not for being based on some famous old book — it is an original work for television, created by Julian Fellowes ("Gosford Park") — but because it is a period piece set in a world we associate with famous old books and, in a secondary way, with "Masterpiece Theater" itself, home of the similar, chronologically overlapping "Upstairs, Downstairs" and the primary domestic expression of the Anglo-American "special relationship," television branch, since 1971.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Jessica Gelt
The "Veronica Mars" resurgence shows no signs of slowing down. The CW President Mark Pedowitz announced on Wednesday that a digital spinoff series is in the works for the network's online-only platform, CW Seed. "Veronica Mars" creator Rob Thomas' hugely successful Kickstarter campaign to make a "Veronica Mars" movie certainly got the network's attention, Pedowitz acknowledged during a session at the Television Critics Assn. press tour in Pasadena.  "Rob and I spoke last night," Pedowitz said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Two 1980s remakes, "RoboCop" and "About Last Night," are poised to beat rival Valentine's Day fare at the box office, but neither is likely to knock down last week's massive chart-topper "The Lego Movie. " The irreverent toy-based comedy should best all the newcomers with about $45 million in revenue from Friday through Presidents Day Monday. It opened last weekend with a massive $69 million -- the biggest debut of the year so far.  With "About Last Night," from Sony's Screen Gems label, comedian Kevin Hart will try to follow up on the success of his recent hit "Ride Along," which partnered him again with William Packer, the producer behind those two movies and Hart's "Think Like a Man. "  PHOTOS: Biggest box office flops of 2013 "About Last Night" is expected to gross $25 million or more through Monday, according to those who have seen pre-release audience surveys.  Hart demonstrated his pull with filmgoers in January when Universal Pictures' "Ride Along," which co-stars Ice Cube, earned a robust $41.5 million over in its first three days in release.
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