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Jessica Foschi

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SPORTS
February 24, 1996
I would like to clarify a statement that appeared in your paper this past Monday. In an article on Jessica Foschi, Elliott Almond states that I said it was not my responsibility to educate athletes about drugs and testing. That statement, paraphrasing my testimony, is incomplete and makes it appear that I am not concerned about these subjects. Nothing could be further from the truth. I was called to testify in regard to Jessica's character. I was asked if educating our swimmers in the areas of drugs and testing was my responsibility.
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SPORTS
June 18, 1997
American distance swimmer Jessica Foschi, who had been suspended for a positive steroid test, won her appeal of the two-year international ban imposed by FINA, the governing body for swimming. The Court of Arbitration for Sport, based in Lausanne, Switzerland, ruled in favor of Foschi on Tuesday, and ordered FINA to pay her $10,350. Foschi, 16, of Old Brookville, N.Y., tested positive for mesterolone after finishing third in the 1,500-meter freestyle in the U.S.
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SPORTS
June 25, 1996 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American distance swimmer Jessica Foschi, who tested positive last summer for an anabolic steroid at a meet in Southern California, has been suspended for two years by FINA, the international governing body for swimming. The ban, which was announced Monday from FINA's headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland, is retroactive to Aug. 4, 1995 when Foschi tested positive for mesterolone after finishing third in the 1,500-meter freestyle at the U.S. summer national championships at Pasadena.
SPORTS
June 18, 1997
American distance swimmer Jessica Foschi, who had been suspended for a positive steroid test, won her appeal of the two-year international ban imposed by FINA, the governing body for swimming. The Court of Arbitration for Sport, based in Lausanne, Switzerland, ruled in favor of Foschi on Tuesday, and ordered FINA to pay her $10,350. Foschi, 16, of Old Brookville, N.Y., tested positive for mesterolone after finishing third in the 1,500-meter freestyle in the U.S.
SPORTS
February 21, 1996 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Swimming leaders questioned their decision to ban Jessica Foschi for taking an anabolic steroid in light of Tuesday's announcement that Australian world-record holder Samantha Riley was cleared by FINA, swimming's international governing body. FINA gave Riley, who tested positive for the drug dextropropoxyphene at the world short-course championships in Brazil in December, merely a "strong warning" but banned her coach, Scott Volkers, for two years.
SPORTS
March 12, 1996 | JOHN JEANSONNE, NEWSDAY
Jessica Foschi finished fourth in the 800-meter freestyle at the Olympic trials on Monday night, when she needed to finish first or second to make the U.S. team for the Atlanta Games. Brooke Bennett won the event, Janet Evans was second and a lot of swimming officials were relieved. "Yep," said former Olympian Bill Stapleton, who served on the first U.S.
SPORTS
February 13, 1996 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 27 hours of testimony from 18 witnesses who discussed the minutiae of rules, regulations and drug testing, Jessica Foschi took 13 heartfelt minutes to proclaim her innocence Monday. In the most compelling moment of a U.S. Swimming drug appeals hearing that ended early Tuesday without an immediate announcement of its outcome, Foschi, of Old Brookville, N.Y., lost her composure.
SPORTS
June 25, 1996 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American distance swimmer Jessica Foschi, who tested positive last summer for an anabolic steroid at a meet in Southern California, has been suspended for two years by FINA, the international governing body for swimming. The ban, which was announced Monday from FINA's headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland, is retroactive to Aug. 4, 1995 when Foschi tested positive for mesterolone after finishing third in the 1,500-meter freestyle at the U.S. summer national championships at Pasadena.
SPORTS
February 12, 1996 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judging by her time in the morning, Jessica Foschi could have swam the 1,500 freestyle 49 times by the time testimony for her controversial drug appeals hearing ended late Sunday night. A 13 1/2-hour day concluded with an exhausted-but-smiling Foschi happy that she finished second to Brooke Bennett in the 1,500 in 16 minutes 41.58 seconds on the final day of the Phillips 66 U.S. spring national championships at the YMCA Aquatic Center in Orlando. Foschi, 15, of Old Brookville, N.Y.
SPORTS
March 12, 1996 | JOHN JEANSONNE, NEWSDAY
Jessica Foschi finished fourth in the 800-meter freestyle at the Olympic trials on Monday night, when she needed to finish first or second to make the U.S. team for the Atlanta Games. Brooke Bennett won the event, Janet Evans was second and a lot of swimming officials were relieved. "Yep," said former Olympian Bill Stapleton, who served on the first U.S.
SPORTS
February 24, 1996
I would like to clarify a statement that appeared in your paper this past Monday. In an article on Jessica Foschi, Elliott Almond states that I said it was not my responsibility to educate athletes about drugs and testing. That statement, paraphrasing my testimony, is incomplete and makes it appear that I am not concerned about these subjects. Nothing could be further from the truth. I was called to testify in regard to Jessica's character. I was asked if educating our swimmers in the areas of drugs and testing was my responsibility.
SPORTS
February 21, 1996 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Swimming leaders questioned their decision to ban Jessica Foschi for taking an anabolic steroid in light of Tuesday's announcement that Australian world-record holder Samantha Riley was cleared by FINA, swimming's international governing body. FINA gave Riley, who tested positive for the drug dextropropoxyphene at the world short-course championships in Brazil in December, merely a "strong warning" but banned her coach, Scott Volkers, for two years.
SPORTS
February 14, 1996 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jessica Foschi, a Long Island teenager who hopes to make the 1996 Olympic team, was banned Tuesday for two years by U.S. Swimming for testing positive for an anabolic steroid that she said she never knowingly took. The federation's 15 board of directors, who deliberated for seven hours, also wrote an interpretation of FINA's medical rules that could put U.S. Swimming out of step with the rest of the world.
SPORTS
February 13, 1996 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 27 hours of testimony from 18 witnesses who discussed the minutiae of rules, regulations and drug testing, Jessica Foschi took 13 heartfelt minutes to proclaim her innocence Monday. In the most compelling moment of a U.S. Swimming drug appeals hearing that ended early Tuesday without an immediate announcement of its outcome, Foschi, of Old Brookville, N.Y., lost her composure.
SPORTS
February 12, 1996 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judging by her time in the morning, Jessica Foschi could have swam the 1,500 freestyle 49 times by the time testimony for her controversial drug appeals hearing ended late Sunday night. A 13 1/2-hour day concluded with an exhausted-but-smiling Foschi happy that she finished second to Brooke Bennett in the 1,500 in 16 minutes 41.58 seconds on the final day of the Phillips 66 U.S. spring national championships at the YMCA Aquatic Center in Orlando. Foschi, 15, of Old Brookville, N.Y.
SPORTS
February 14, 1996 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jessica Foschi, a Long Island teenager who hopes to make the 1996 Olympic team, was banned Tuesday for two years by U.S. Swimming for testing positive for an anabolic steroid that she said she never knowingly took. The federation's 15 board of directors, who deliberated for seven hours, also wrote an interpretation of FINA's medical rules that could put U.S. Swimming out of step with the rest of the world.
SPORTS
February 11, 1996 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jessica Foschi of Old Brookville, N.Y., is on the verge of becoming a world-class distance swimmer, but whether she ever achieves that status may not be determined by her performances. Instead, Foschi's future may rest with U.S. swimming officials, arbitrators and judges, a possibility that makes her shudder. The Long Island teenager is the focus of a drug-testing controversy that could have worldwide reverberations in amateur sport.
SPORTS
February 11, 1996 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jessica Foschi of Old Brookville, N.Y., is on the verge of becoming a world-class distance swimmer, but whether she ever achieves that status may not be determined by her performances. Instead, Foschi's future may rest with U.S. swimming officials, arbitrators and judges, a possibility that makes her shudder. The Long Island teenager is the focus of a drug-testing controversy that could have worldwide reverberations in amateur sport.
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