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Jessica Goldberg

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June 2, 2001 | HUGH HART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Good Thing," the startling new play from Brooklyn transplant Jessica Goldberg, is a tale of two kitchens. Bouncing off the stage-left walls at the Actors' Gang in Hollywood are "the kids," as Goldberg calls them: a man with a dead-end job who's tempted by a old high school flame while his pregnant wife and younger brother bond over a ruinous fondness for methamphetamine.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
Krysten Ritter and Brian Geraghty, performers who have delivered striking work elsewhere, are hard to read in "Refuge," a torpid drama about a tentative new romance. Or perhaps they're too easy to read; whatever emotional depths filmmaker Jessica Goldberg hopes to suggest, there's nothing stirring beneath the movie's static surface. The central characters' coupledom might bring them a safe haven, but audiences will be left out in the cold. Adapting her stage play, Goldberg uses wintry Southampton, N.Y., locations to convey a down-and-out working-class vibe.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
Krysten Ritter and Brian Geraghty, performers who have delivered striking work elsewhere, are hard to read in "Refuge," a torpid drama about a tentative new romance. Or perhaps they're too easy to read; whatever emotional depths filmmaker Jessica Goldberg hopes to suggest, there's nothing stirring beneath the movie's static surface. The central characters' coupledom might bring them a safe haven, but audiences will be left out in the cold. Adapting her stage play, Goldberg uses wintry Southampton, N.Y., locations to convey a down-and-out working-class vibe.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2001 | HUGH HART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Good Thing," the startling new play from Brooklyn transplant Jessica Goldberg, is a tale of two kitchens. Bouncing off the stage-left walls at the Actors' Gang in Hollywood are "the kids," as Goldberg calls them: a man with a dead-end job who's tempted by a old high school flame while his pregnant wife and younger brother bond over a ruinous fondness for methamphetamine.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Kitchen sink drama might make a comeback, judging from "Good Thing," a gripping new play by Jessica Goldberg, produced in the Taper, Too series at the Actors' Gang. Much of the play is literally set in two contrasting kitchens. But the phrase "kitchen sink drama" usually connotes more than the setting; it suggests a realistic look at the domestic travails of people who aren't very high on the economic ladder. "Good Thing" qualifies.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2001
* "Yankee Dawg You Die," Philip Kan Gotanda's drama exploring the convergence of film, identity, politics and art, plays Wednesday-June 17 at the David Henry Hwang Theater, 120 N. Judge John Aiso St., Little Tokyo. $25 to $30. (800) 233-3123. * Taper, Too presents "Good Thing," Jessica Goldberg's drama about four young adults struggling with drugs, alcohol and emotional turmoil, May 23-June 9 at Actors' Gang, 6209 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood. $20. (213) 628-2772.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2000
* Theater--The Ojai Playwrights Conference will return July 21-23 to Zalk Theater at Happy Valley School. This year's event will offer staged readings of new works by five playwrights. The schedule: July 21, 8 p.m., "Love and Yearning in the Not-for-Profits and Other Marital Distractions" by Ari Roth; July 22, 3 p.m., "Nocturne" by Adam Rapp, and 8 p.m., "Polish Joke" by David Ives; July 23, 3 p.m., "Good Thing" by Jessica Goldberg, and 7:30 p.m., "Fortune" by Deborah Zoe Laufer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2009 | Karen Wada
Plays about love and Big Pharma, magicians, a son's death in Iraq, and life at the post office are part of this fall's DouglasPlus series of new works, the Center Theatre Group announced Thursday. Artistic Director Michael Ritchie introduced the series at the Kirk Douglas Theatre last season in an attempt to break away from traditional programming and production constraints. The emphasis is on material in development at Center Theatre Group, with a nod to local artists. Shows are presented for limited runs at reduced prices.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2000
This weekend's Ojai Playwrights Conference at Happy Valley School's Zalk Theater will highlight staged readings of new works by five playwrights. Each reading will be followed by an audience-participation discussion with the playwright, director and cast. * Ojai Playwrights Conference, Friday, 8 p.m., "Love and Yearning in the Not-for-Profits and Other Marital Distractions" by Ari Roth; Saturday, 3 p.m., "Nocturne" by Adam Rapp, and 8 p.m., "Polish Joke" by David Ives; Sunday, 3 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2008 | Charles McNulty, Times Theater Critic
Wendy Hoffman (Kristina Lear), an earnest screenwriter with an attractive, low-key style, wants to tell the story of injured vets at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Capt. Gray Whitrock (Michael James Reed), a strapping military guy with a prosthetic foot and a by-the-book manner, is the gatekeeper to the ward. Their verbal tug-of-war -- laden with as much partisan disdain as sneaky sexual subtext -- establishes the serious game of Jessica Goldberg's new play, "Body Politic."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Kitchen sink drama might make a comeback, judging from "Good Thing," a gripping new play by Jessica Goldberg, produced in the Taper, Too series at the Actors' Gang. Much of the play is literally set in two contrasting kitchens. But the phrase "kitchen sink drama" usually connotes more than the setting; it suggests a realistic look at the domestic travails of people who aren't very high on the economic ladder. "Good Thing" qualifies.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2001
Wrong, wrong, wrong! Michael Phillips' review of "Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks" ("In Class by Themselves," June 9) couldn't have been more off. To compare Richard Alfieri's sensitive, insightful script to a "Golden Girls" episode makes me wonder whether Phillips and I saw the same play. At least he gave Uta Hagen and David Hyde Pierce the kudos that they so richly deserve for their performances. Perhaps Phillips never had a widowed mother who lived alone in Florida and took endless dance lessons as a way to fend off loneliness and isolation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2004 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
Oh, the eternal dilemma of the woman in love: Does she mask her intelligence and hobble her strength to keep from intimidating the guy? Or does she refuse to compromise, come what may? This predicament is studied anew in "Sex Parasite," a play by Jessica Goldberg that imagines the struggles faced by Olive Schreiner (1855-1920), whose social tracts influenced the early movement for women's rights. Already a much-produced playwright at 31, Goldberg is working with some ambitious ideas here.
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