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Jessica Hagedorn

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NEWS
October 28, 1996 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A definition is like a lasso: Whatever we fail to catch in its narrow circle escapes us. So a complicated person who tries to define herself--like Raquel "Rocky" Rivera, the rock singer heroine of Jessica Hagedorn's latest novel, "The Gangster of Love"--has to keep tossing out her rope. Born in the Philippines, Rocky moves to San Francisco as a teenager in the 1970s with her mother, Milagros, and her brother, Voltaire. American pop culture sweeps her away.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2004 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
When the first edition of editor Jessica Hagedorn's "Charlie Chan Is Dead" anthology was published in 1993, it was nothing short of groundbreaking: a collection of contemporary fiction by 48 Asian American writers, including Bharati Mukherjee, Maxine Hong Kingston and John Yau. It's a shame that such a gap in the literary marketplace existed, but it did.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2004 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
When the first edition of editor Jessica Hagedorn's "Charlie Chan Is Dead" anthology was published in 1993, it was nothing short of groundbreaking: a collection of contemporary fiction by 48 Asian American writers, including Bharati Mukherjee, Maxine Hong Kingston and John Yau. It's a shame that such a gap in the literary marketplace existed, but it did.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1998 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
To many in the United States, the Philippines remain an indistinct collection of tropical islands: exotic, agricultural and beset with frequent political upheaval. The country's recent history might seem to begin and end with martial law and Imelda Marcos' shoe collection. Yet to poet-novelist Jessica Hagedorn, the island republic where she was born is also a place with important ties to America. "I think the connection to the United States is so intense," says the petite, 49-year-old writer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1998 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
To many in the United States, the Philippines remain an indistinct collection of tropical islands: exotic, agricultural and beset with frequent political upheaval. The country's recent history might seem to begin and end with martial law and Imelda Marcos' shoe collection. Yet to poet-novelist Jessica Hagedorn, the island republic where she was born is also a place with important ties to America. "I think the connection to the United States is so intense," says the petite, 49-year-old writer.
NEWS
January 4, 1994 | VERONICA CHAMBERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is all too easy to lump minority writers together. For Asian American writers, it's been no different. Gish Jen jokingly refers to the "Gang of Four" approach: She is often compared to Gus Lee, David Wong Louie and Amy Tan. What then is the purpose of not one, but two anthologies of Asian American writing? Plenty. Above all, to show the individuality of the Asian American experience and the breadth of human stories these writers have to tell. Jen, represented in both anthologies, has a story in "Growing Up Asian-American" that is the perfect example of how grouping all Asian Americans together can be a big mistake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dorothy Louise Johnston, 70, a member of the board of trustees of the La Jolla Playhouse and a leading benefactor of that institution, died May 28 at her home in La Jolla. The cause of death was a carcinoid tumor. Beginning in 1983, Johnston was an active member of the playhouse's board.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1986 | RICHARD CROMELIN
In this feature, The Times' Pop Music writers spotlight out-of-the-way albums of special merit. Album: "A Diamond Hidden in the Mouth of a Corpse" (Giorno Poetry Systems Records). Artists: Husker Du, David Johansen, John Giorno Band, William S. Burroughs, Sonic Youth, Cabaret Voltaire, Diamanda Galas, Coil, Michael Gira, David Van Tieghem, Jessica Hagedorn & the Gangster Choir.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1998 | DON SHIRLEY
Plenty of interesting plays are on tap for the fall. Jessica Hagedorn's "Dogeaters" (opening Sunday) takes a Filipina from age 13 in 1959 to adulthood during the Marcos years. The first play commissioned by La Jolla Playhouse since Michael Greif became artistic director, it's being staged by Greif with a cast that includes Sandra Oh and Ovation winner Alec Mapa. Jonathan Tolins' "If Memory Serves" (Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1997
As a former literary manager for East West Players, I helped to develop several of the plays mentioned in Laurie Winer's review of a collection of new Asian American plays ("A Collection With Much Missing," Aug. 31). I dispute her comment that its editor, Velina Hasu Houston, makes a "tired" argument by overstating "the cultural resistance" to Asian American plays. Does Winer really think that the production of a few plays in Southern California represents a nationwide acceptance of Asian American storytelling?
NEWS
October 28, 1996 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A definition is like a lasso: Whatever we fail to catch in its narrow circle escapes us. So a complicated person who tries to define herself--like Raquel "Rocky" Rivera, the rock singer heroine of Jessica Hagedorn's latest novel, "The Gangster of Love"--has to keep tossing out her rope. Born in the Philippines, Rocky moves to San Francisco as a teenager in the 1970s with her mother, Milagros, and her brother, Voltaire. American pop culture sweeps her away.
NEWS
January 4, 1994 | VERONICA CHAMBERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is all too easy to lump minority writers together. For Asian American writers, it's been no different. Gish Jen jokingly refers to the "Gang of Four" approach: She is often compared to Gus Lee, David Wong Louie and Amy Tan. What then is the purpose of not one, but two anthologies of Asian American writing? Plenty. Above all, to show the individuality of the Asian American experience and the breadth of human stories these writers have to tell. Jen, represented in both anthologies, has a story in "Growing Up Asian-American" that is the perfect example of how grouping all Asian Americans together can be a big mistake.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Video maker Shu Lea Cheang's vibrant experimental debut feature, "Fresh Kill," is self-described as "Eco-Cyber-Noia," and it's hard to improve upon that. She and writer Jessica Hagedorn concern themselves with the interaction of a deteriorating environment, burgeoning cyberspace and mounting urban paranoia to create a vividly contemporary background for their gentle lesbian love story.
BOOKS
January 17, 1993 | MICHAEL HARRIS
LISTEN TO THEIR VOICES: Twenty Interviews With Women Who Write, by Mickey Pearlman (Norton: $20.95; 224 pp.) Writers generally feel that they've said everything important in their writing. Readers don't agree. They want the story behind the stories--not just in tell-all biographies, but in writers' own explanations of who they are and of how and why they work.
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