Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJessica Hendra
IN THE NEWS

Jessica Hendra

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2005 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
JESSICA HENDRA'S life today bears no resemblance to the nothing-is-sacred bohemian chaos that marked her childhood, when there were bong hits in the living room and piles of cocaine in the fridge, when John Belushi was a family friend and weekends were for skinny-dipping.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2009 | Mary McNamara
God, they say, is in the details, but reading "Beverly Hills Adjacent," one can't help but feel that plot helps too. A bit like "Little Children" gone Hollywood, "Beverly Hills Adjacent" is so front-loaded with details it almost collapses: It's not just a cupcake from Sprinkles, it's a red velvet cupcake from Sprinkles; a character didn't just wait tables when she came to L.A., she waitressed at Kate Mantilini. Such specificity is not surprising.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2009 | Mary McNamara
God, they say, is in the details, but reading "Beverly Hills Adjacent," one can't help but feel that plot helps too. A bit like "Little Children" gone Hollywood, "Beverly Hills Adjacent" is so front-loaded with details it almost collapses: It's not just a cupcake from Sprinkles, it's a red velvet cupcake from Sprinkles; a character didn't just wait tables when she came to L.A., she waitressed at Kate Mantilini. Such specificity is not surprising.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2005 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
JESSICA HENDRA'S life today bears no resemblance to the nothing-is-sacred bohemian chaos that marked her childhood, when there were bong hits in the living room and piles of cocaine in the fridge, when John Belushi was a family friend and weekends were for skinny-dipping.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1995 | PHILIP BRANDES
For all its dutifully researched background detail, there's a curious lack of authenticity to "Borderlands," Mona Koppelman's quasi-absurdist take on the plight of female refugees in the war-torn former Yugoslavia. A kind of "Bosnia, American Style," Koppelman's play at the Rose Theater imposes all manner of alien sensibilities on that troubled region.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2003 | F. Kathleen Foley; Daryl H. Miller
Jonna Tamases covers familiar ground in "Jonna's Body, Please Hold," a one-woman show at the Odyssey about Tamases' struggle with cancer. Other actors have used the solo format to explicate their experiences with cancer, most notably Julia Sweeney in the charming "God Said, Ha!" But whereas Sweeney used a disarming, intimately ironic tone to discuss her ordeal, Tamases takes an unabashedly theatricalized tack.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|