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Jessica Kubzansky

ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2005 | Rob Kendt, Special to The Times
It takes a special leap of imagination -- a leap of faith, even -- to look at a mild-mannered Lutheran pastor and see in him Madame Ranevskaya, the disastrously sentimental widow of Anton Chekhov's "The Cherry Orchard." Or, by extension, to compare the current senescence of mainline Protestantism to the destabilizing decline of Russia's landed gentry 120 years ago. But then Tom Jacobson ("Ouroboros") is no ordinary playwright.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2004 | Philip Brandes, Special to The Times
As celebrity love triangles go, among the most complicated -- and historically significant -- was one that found the 18th century French writer Voltaire caught in an emotional tug of war between his mistress, the brilliant aristocratic Emilie du Chatelet, and his admirer, Frederick the Great, the poet-warrior king of Prussia. Their amorous adventures helped shape the turbulent intellectual, political and religious currents in an age of cultural transition.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2013 | By David Ng
Theater leaders in Southern California will convene for a second panel on racial diversity that will serve as a sequel of sorts to last year's discussion hosted by East West Players in downtown Los Angeles. The upcoming panel will be held Dec. 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Pasadena Playhouse. While last year's event was by invitation only, the upcoming discussion is free and open to the public. Panelists expected to attend include Michael Ritchie, artistic director of Center Theatre Group; Marc Masterson, artistic director of South Coast Repertory; Sheldon Epps, artistic director of the Pasadena Playhouse; Tim Dang, artistic director of East West Players; and Jessica Kubzansky, co-artistic director of the Theatre @ Boston Court.  PHOTOS: Arts and culture in pictures by The Times The 2012 panel was convened in response to a production of the Duncan Sheik musical "The Nightingale" at the La Jolla Playhouse earlier that year.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
In this time when news is disseminated ever more quickly, we asked our critics to list the best of culture in 2013 in tweet form: Southern California: David Mamet's "American Buffalo" was revived at the Geffen with its concussive verbal force and fierce con games intact. Christopher Shinn's "Dying City" delicately explored the slipperiness of traumatic memory in a multilayered production at Rogue Machine. John Douglas Thompson and Glynn Turman brought anguish and ecstasy to the searing Mark Taper Forum revival of "Joe Turner's Come and Gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
“To mortal man, how great a scourge is love,” is one of countless ingenious lines that adorn “The Children” at the Theatre @ Boston Court. Michael Elyanow's stunning riff on the Medea myth rips Euripides into current-day context, and rams its meanings into our brainpans. Beginning before a Stygian drape that masks designer François-Pierre Couture's jagged-wood set, an aptly named Man-In-Slacks and Woman-In-Sundress (Sonny Valicenti and Paige Lindsey White, both beyond praise)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Joe Orton's "Loot" fits comfortably into a summer of "Survivor" and "Big Brother," if not quite so comfortably into the Center Theater of the Long Beach Performing Arts Center. In Orton's farce from mid-'60s England, a group of people desperately scheme to win a grand prize. Sometimes they work in teams; at other times individuals don't hesitate to sever previous ties. A shadowy authority figure tells them what they can and cannot do.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Right up there with the ol' soft shoe, the ol' hard sell is as American a tradition as . . . well, as Eugene O'Neill. No one sold harder than our poet laureate of self-loathing and guilt and foolish, beautiful dreamers. Actors, good ones, often run into trouble when they're trying to energize O'Neill on stage. Their instincts say "Sell! Sell!" when a scene may actually call for something beyond energy--something closer to a sense of trust in themselves, of burrowing inward.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Hare's "Amy's View" takes a panoramic look at a 16-year span in the lives of its characters and an indirect glimpse at cultural changes in England between 1979 and 1995. But it feels surprisingly detailed and solid, without the sketchy quality that often afflicts plays that attempt to cover so much in less than three hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2000 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lost opportunities hover like ghosts in "The All Souls Trilogy," a cycle of plays about what people turn to--belief, beauty, one another--when life sends them reeling. AIDS and its opportunistic infections of helplessness and despair weigh heavily upon the stories' gay and lesbian characters, but the other ills that befall them are often of their own making.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2003 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
Few plays in William Shakespeare's canon carry the ambiguities of "Measure for Measure," now opening A Noise Within's spring repertory season in Glendale. Although the Folio listings identify this 1623 study of political and sexual hypocrisy as a comedy, tragedy lurks behind every stanza. It takes place in Vienna, where Duke Vincentio (Joel Swetow) initiates the narrative by handing over governing duties to deputy Angelo (Michael Sean McGuinness).
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