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Jessica Mendoza

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SPORTS
May 2, 1998 | PAIGE A. LEECH
What could be better for Camarillo High than having Stanford-bound Jessica Mendoza anchoring the infield at shortstop? Answer: Having her freshman sister, Alana, at second base. The Mendozas have combined for only three errors in 90 chances for a .967 fielding percentage. Playing together--and in such close proximity--has added a new dimension to their relationship, both acknowledged.
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SPORTS
July 27, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
LONDON - It was early Friday night here, and neither Don Porter nor Jessica Mendoza was in a good place. Limos were gathering the VIPs from the VIP hotels along Park Lane. Soon, the opening ceremony of the London Olympics would begin. They were to be, as all Olympic openings have become, an artistic springboard to an athletic extravaganza. Porter sat in an empty lounge alcove of the Grosvenor House Hotel and watched the hustle and bustle of departing dignitaries. He attended his first Games in 1968 in Mexico City, and with the exception of the U.S.-boycotted Moscow Games and the Munich Games in 1972, he had been to every Olympic Summer opener since 1976 in Montreal.
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SPORTS
March 17, 2001 | From Staff Reports
Jessica Mendoza was selected national player of the week for leading No. 5-ranked Stanford to the Speedline Invitational softball title in Tampa, Fla. Mendoza, a 1998 Camarillo High graduate, went 12 for 26 in eight games with three home runs and six stolen bases, and scored 12 runs, including the game-winners in the semifinal and championship games. The junior center fielder, who has 41 runs batted in, leads the Cardinal (28-2-1) with a .
SPORTS
March 17, 2001 | From Staff Reports
Jessica Mendoza was selected national player of the week for leading No. 5-ranked Stanford to the Speedline Invitational softball title in Tampa, Fla. Mendoza, a 1998 Camarillo High graduate, went 12 for 26 in eight games with three home runs and six stolen bases, and scored 12 runs, including the game-winners in the semifinal and championship games. The junior center fielder, who has 41 runs batted in, leads the Cardinal (28-2-1) with a .
SPORTS
April 10, 1998 | PAIGE A. LEECH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight games into the season, Camarillo High has proven it is the toughest softball team in the region to beat and score against. The reasons are obvious: The Scorpions have perhaps the finest pitching in the area, a top-notch defense and, well, Jessica Mendoza. On Thursday, Camarillo tapped into all three of its strengths to edge Simi Valley, 1-0, in a Marmonte League game between two of the state's top 10 teams. Camarillo (8-0, 5-0 in league play), ranked No.
SPORTS
March 30, 1997 | PAIGE A. LEECH
In a split second, everything changed for Camarillo High softball catcher Jessica Mendoza. One moment she was awaiting a fielder's throw at the plate, the next she was on the ground clutching her knee. During a tournament game against Hart, Mendoza tore the medial collateral ligament in her left knee when runner Vanessa Raschella collided with her on a play at the plate. Mendoza went one way, her knee went the other. "I was blocking the plate down the line," Mendoza recalled.
SPORTS
April 28, 2000 | PAIGE A. LEECH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The demons of a sophomore jinx were breathing down the neck of Jessica Mendoza, and she was fast approaching meltdown. Ten games into her second season at Stanford, Mendoza felt she wasn't living up to the extraordinary standards she set as a freshman. Batting .294 with three runs batted in after 10 games is not exactly Mendoza's idea of contributing to a 9-1 team. Not after rewriting the Cardinal record book a season earlier.
SPORTS
July 27, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
LONDON - It was early Friday night here, and neither Don Porter nor Jessica Mendoza was in a good place. Limos were gathering the VIPs from the VIP hotels along Park Lane. Soon, the opening ceremony of the London Olympics would begin. They were to be, as all Olympic openings have become, an artistic springboard to an athletic extravaganza. Porter sat in an empty lounge alcove of the Grosvenor House Hotel and watched the hustle and bustle of departing dignitaries. He attended his first Games in 1968 in Mexico City, and with the exception of the U.S.-boycotted Moscow Games and the Munich Games in 1972, he had been to every Olympic Summer opener since 1976 in Montreal.
SPORTS
June 5, 1996
SOFTBALL First Team *--* Player Position School Cindy Ball P Camarillo Kristi Fox P Newbury Park Melanie Richardson P Camarillo Jennifer Sharron P Thousand Oaks Jessica Mendoza C Camarillo Amy Berman IF Newbury Park Erika Hanson IF Thousand Oaks Robyn Reida IF Buena Brooke Rutschman IF Camarillo Tracey Milburn OF Moorpark Elisa Muran OF Newbury Park Carol Saldana OF Rio Mesa Lori Tande U Simi Valley *--* Second Team *--* Player Position School Jennifer Baltruzak P La Reina Kelly DeArman P
SPORTS
May 26, 2000 | PAIGE A. LEECH
The accolades keep rolling in for Jessica Mendoza of Stanford. Mendoza, a sophomore outfielder and graduate of Camarillo High, made the National Fastpitch Coaches Assn. All-American team for the second time Wednesday night at a banquet in Oklahoma City. Mendoza leads the nation with a .475 batting average, a Cardinal record, and was Pacific 10 Conference player of the year. She also had single-season school records of 94 hits, 20 doubles, 13 home runs, 57 runs and 20 stolen bases.
SPORTS
April 28, 2000 | PAIGE A. LEECH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The demons of a sophomore jinx were breathing down the neck of Jessica Mendoza, and she was fast approaching meltdown. Ten games into her second season at Stanford, Mendoza felt she wasn't living up to the extraordinary standards she set as a freshman. Batting .294 with three runs batted in after 10 games is not exactly Mendoza's idea of contributing to a 9-1 team. Not after rewriting the Cardinal record book a season earlier.
SPORTS
May 2, 1998 | PAIGE A. LEECH
What could be better for Camarillo High than having Stanford-bound Jessica Mendoza anchoring the infield at shortstop? Answer: Having her freshman sister, Alana, at second base. The Mendozas have combined for only three errors in 90 chances for a .967 fielding percentage. Playing together--and in such close proximity--has added a new dimension to their relationship, both acknowledged.
SPORTS
April 10, 1998 | PAIGE A. LEECH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight games into the season, Camarillo High has proven it is the toughest softball team in the region to beat and score against. The reasons are obvious: The Scorpions have perhaps the finest pitching in the area, a top-notch defense and, well, Jessica Mendoza. On Thursday, Camarillo tapped into all three of its strengths to edge Simi Valley, 1-0, in a Marmonte League game between two of the state's top 10 teams. Camarillo (8-0, 5-0 in league play), ranked No.
SPORTS
March 30, 1997 | PAIGE A. LEECH
In a split second, everything changed for Camarillo High softball catcher Jessica Mendoza. One moment she was awaiting a fielder's throw at the plate, the next she was on the ground clutching her knee. During a tournament game against Hart, Mendoza tore the medial collateral ligament in her left knee when runner Vanessa Raschella collided with her on a play at the plate. Mendoza went one way, her knee went the other. "I was blocking the plate down the line," Mendoza recalled.
SPORTS
July 10, 1998 | PAIGE A. LEECH, From Staff Reports
Jessica Mendoza of Camarillo High was selected Thursday to the high school All-American team by the National Fastpitch Coaches Assn. Pitcher Maureen LeCocq of Chaminade was selected to the second team. Mendoza, a middle infielder who played half the season with an injured shoulder, batted .477 with 42 hits against mostly Southern Section Division I competition. The Stanford-bound Mendoza led the Scorpions to the Division I semifinals, where they lost to eventual champion Mater Dei, 2-1.
SPORTS
June 2, 2010 | By David Wharton and Melissa Rohlin
There was nothing complicated about that photograph of Elena Kagan, the one that showed her standing at bat on a playground diamond. Maybe if she had been kicking a soccer ball or diving off the high board, there wouldn't have been as much fuss. But the Supreme Court nominee's sexual orientation was already the stuff of rumors, given that she was single and kept her hair short. Her supporters accused conservatives of trying to damage her chances by whispering that she was gay. Adding softball to the conversation only amped up the volume, all those bloggers and television commentators, and the White House was compelled to reiterate that Kagan was heterosexual.
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