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Jessica Mills

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SPORTS
January 8, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
One daughter, barely 16, lives in Houston, where she has developed into the country's best gymnast. Another daughter, 14, lives in Southern California, where she is making a name for herself as a figure skater. A son, 18, the eldest of half a dozen children, has returned to the family nest in Northfield, Ill., an upper middle-class suburb of Chicago, after sharpening his speed skating skills for a year in Butte, Mont., and Calgary.
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SPORTS
July 20, 1991 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jessica Mills competed in the Festival figure skating competition last weekend at the Forum, finished seventh, then returned to the dormitory at Loyola Marymount University where the figure skaters were being housed. She had a week to wait before she would begin competition in speedskating, the other event she is entered in. So she assumed that she would stay at Loyola until the other speedskaters arrived in Los Angeles. But you know what they say about assuming.
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SPORTS
January 8, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY
Women's figure skating in the United States may have seen the future Wednesday night. Her name is Jessica Mills, known to her family as Jesse. In her first national championship competition, Mills, the youngest skater at 13, exhibited the poise of someone much more experienced and finished fourth in the junior ladies' division. The winner was Seattle's Dena Galech, 17. Mills is from Northfield, Ill., a Chicago suburb, but she has not lived at home since she was 9.
SPORTS
January 8, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
One daughter, barely 16, lives in Houston, where she has developed into the country's best gymnast. Another daughter, 14, lives in Southern California, where she is making a name for herself as a figure skater. A son, 18, the eldest of half a dozen children, has returned to the family nest in Northfield, Ill., an upper middle-class suburb of Chicago, after sharpening his speed skating skills for a year in Butte, Mont., and Calgary.
SPORTS
July 20, 1991 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jessica Mills competed in the Festival figure skating competition last weekend at the Forum, finished seventh, then returned to the dormitory at Loyola Marymount University where the figure skaters were being housed. She had a week to wait before she would begin competition in speedskating, the other event she is entered in. So she assumed that she would stay at Loyola until the other speedskaters arrived in Los Angeles. But you know what they say about assuming.
SPORTS
December 1, 1989
Tisha Walker of Thousand Oaks placed 11th in the compulsory figures in the World Junior Figure Skating championships in Colorado Springs, Colo., on Thursday. Walker, 15, finished 12th in the first figure and fourth in the second, leaving her 11th overall after the first day of competition. Yuka Sato of Japan was the leader after the compulsory figures, followed by Jessica Mills of the United States and Susanne Mildenberger of West Germany.
SPORTS
February 13, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY
It was Japanese-American week at the U.S. figure skating championships. After Kristi Yamaguchi finished second in the women's individual competition and first in pairs on the senior level, Kyoko Ina won the junior girls' championship Sunday at the Baltimore Arena. That gives Ina, 16, of Englewood Cliffs, N.J., junior championships in two hemispheres. She was Japan's junior champion in 1987.
SPORTS
December 8, 1989 | JEFF MEYERS
The usual remedy for a sore throat and a stuffy nose does not include an outing on a slab of ice, but try telling that to Tisha Walker. Walker, a 15-year-old sophomore at Thousand Oaks High, would not let a bug keep her from representing the United States last week in the World Junior Figure-Skating Championships in Colorado Springs, Colo. Given antibiotics by the team doctor, she finished seventh among 30 competitors in the junior ladies' division.
SPORTS
February 11, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Kristi Yamaguchi of Fremont, Calif., and Rudi Galindo of San Jose, world junior champions less than two years ago, won the pairs title Friday night in the U.S. figure skating championships at the Baltimore Arena. But as brilliantly as they skated, earning a standing ovation from the crowd of 9,836, their victory was overshadowed by a judging controversy. Even though Olympians Natalie and Wayne Seybold of Marion, Ind.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | MAIA DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like the other four senior princesses at Nordhoff High School, Veronica Velasquez will be escorted down a red carpet before thousands of spectators during halftime at tonight's homecoming football game. But unlike the other princesses, 18-year-old Velasquez's cheering section will include a husband, Rony Velasquez, and a 3-year-old daughter, Melanie.
SPORTS
January 8, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY
Women's figure skating in the United States may have seen the future Wednesday night. Her name is Jessica Mills, known to her family as Jesse. In her first national championship competition, Mills, the youngest skater at 13, exhibited the poise of someone much more experienced and finished fourth in the junior ladies' division. The winner was Seattle's Dena Galech, 17. Mills is from Northfield, Ill., a Chicago suburb, but she has not lived at home since she was 9.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1991 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest San Diego County payout for a jail beating death, county officials have agreed to a $650,000 settlement with the orphaned 10-year-old daughter of chokehold victim Albert Varela. The settlement is structured to guarantee Varela's daughter, Jessica Mills, $1.9 million when the money is placed in an annuity, which could pay her a total of $4 million if she lives to be 74.
SPORTS
February 26, 1989 | JEFF MEYERS, Times Staff Writer
Bonnie Walker was worried. A video camera recently had been pilfered from her van, which had been parked right outside her Thousand Oaks home. Now she and the family were going out of town and she didn't want to take any chances. Who knows? Maybe some sort of crazed videophile was prowling the neighborhood. So before leaving, she hid the family's prized possessions: a pair of VHS tapes.
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