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Jessica S Law

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2013 | By Paige St. John
STOCKTON -- In 2009, a Sacramento jury convicted Rithy Mam of stalking a 12-year-old girl, shadowing her for months and telling her family he dreamed of her. Three years later, Mam is accused of menacing two other girls, allegedly bribing a toddler with soda and candy to repeatedly slip into their Stockton living room while their parents were out. California voters in 2006 passed a law to prevent repeat offenses. Jessica's Law, named after a Florida girl who was raped and killed by a convicted sex offender, requires lifelong GPS monitoring of registered sex offenders.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2013 | By Paige St. John
STOCKTON -- In 2009, a Sacramento jury convicted Rithy Mam of stalking a 12-year-old girl, shadowing her for months and telling her family he dreamed of her. Three years later, Mam is accused of menacing two other girls, allegedly bribing a toddler with soda and candy to repeatedly slip into their Stockton living room while their parents were out. California voters in 2006 passed a law to prevent repeat offenses. Jessica's Law, named after a Florida girl who was raped and killed by a convicted sex offender, requires lifelong GPS monitoring of registered sex offenders.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2008 | Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writer
In the final week of campaigning before Tuesday's election, Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley drew fire Friday over a deal he made with judges and defense attorneys two years ago to postpone seeking tougher sanctions against some serious sex offenders who had already served their prison sentences.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Michael McGough
The Times has an editorial Friday about legislation proposed in the aftermath of the suicide of Aaron Swartz, the computer prodigy who was being prosecuted by the federal government for  allegedly gaining unauthorized access to an online repository of academic research. Known as  Aaron's Law, the bill by Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-San Jose) would bar computer or wire fraud prosecutions based on violations of a website's terms or policies if such violations were the "sole basis" for determining that access was unauthorized.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2007 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
Habitual sex offender Ross Wollschlager has bounced from one Ventura County hotel to another in the weeks since his release from a state mental hospital, getting ejected each time the owner learned of his identity. Publicity about his release has made it impossible for the 44-year-old convicted rapist to find a rural landlord willing to give him a place to live. After seven evictions, Liberty Healthcare Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2006 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Calling public safety government's most important job, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Wednesday signed a package of bills increasing prison terms for many sex offenders and barring them from loitering near schools and parks once they are released. The measures, signed seven weeks before voters will decide on a ballot initiative offering similar provisions, also require that sex offenders deemed high-risk by authorities wear electronic tracking devices while on parole.
OPINION
November 12, 2006
WHEN POPULAR democracy comes up against the Constitution, democracy must stand aside -- or at least wait its turn. That is the fate confronting Proposition 83, also known as Jessica's Law, which was approved overwhelmingly by California voters Tuesday and stayed by a federal judge Wednesday. The law would ban people convicted of certain sex offenses from living within 2,000 feet of a school or park and would track such convicts by global positioning satellite for the rest of their lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2008 | Charles Piller
The California Assembly unanimously passed a measure Tuesday that would reauthorize the state Department of Mental Health to use private contractors to evaluate sex offenders for mental illness. If a jury confirms the diagnosis, the individuals are committed to a mental hospital indefinitely in lieu of parole. The Senate earlier passed the bill, also unanimously. "Jessica's Law," passed by voters in 2006 as Proposition 83, dramatically increased the number of inmates who must be examined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2008 | Michael Rothfeld
The number of homeless sex offenders on parole in California has increased dramatically since the approval two years ago of Proposition 83, an initiative that imposed harsh restrictions on where they can live, a state panel reported Thursday. The Sex Offender Management Board said the number of parolees monitored by the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation -- one of the only government agencies to enforce what is known as Jessica's Law -- increased from 88 in November 2006 to 1,056 at the end of June 2008.
OPINION
September 12, 2007
Re "Sex offender is free -- and reduced to a riverbed," Sept. 8 Your article on the impossible residency restriction created by Jessica's Law barring convicted sex offenders from living within 2,000 feet of any school, park or beach is right on target. Perhaps if our lawmakers concentrated on making laws that made sense, we would be able to come up with logical and well-thought-out solutions to social problems.
OPINION
November 16, 2010 | Michael P. Judge
Some critics of Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Peter Espinoza's order temporarily staying enforcement of the sex offender residency restrictions of Jessica's Law, reported by The Times on Nov. 5, are exploiting the legitimate fears of decent people. These critics ignore the reality that these particular residency restrictions apply to all paroled sex registrants, most of whom have never harmed a child, and do not effectively protect our children. In fact, by creating a crisis of homelessness among sex registrants, broad residency restrictions actually endanger our community.
OPINION
November 6, 2010
Before parents shudder at the thought of sex offenders now being allowed to live within 2,000 feet of schools and parks, they should remember the utter lack of evidence that the restriction ever kept a child from being molested. Sexual predators don't stick to a half-mile radius when it comes to finding victims. And making them homeless, as Jessica's Law sometimes did, is more dangerous to the public. That's why Thursday's Superior Court ruling that found sections of the law unconstitutional isn't just good news for ex-convicts trying to find a place in society; it's better for society too. "It's harder to protect the public when he is homeless," a Ventura County prosecutor told The Times three years ago, when a molester there was unable to find housing.
OPINION
January 25, 2009
Re "Revisit Jessica's Law," editorial, Jan. 19 While California has gone to great expense to outfit all people on parole for sex offenses with GPS monitors, regardless of risk level, it has recently suspended all contracts with providers of specialized sex-offender treatment to parolees. In other words, one of the few proven tools for reducing recidivism among sex offenders has been sidelined because of the current budget crisis, while an outrageously expensive tactic that has not been shown to make a difference in recidivism has been generously funded.
OPINION
January 19, 2009
Of all the ill-considered ballot initiatives approved by California voters over the years, few can match Jessica's Law for sheer self-destructiveness. The measure, billed as a way to protect children from sexual predators when it appeared on the ballot in 2006 as Proposition 83, is worsening the yawning state budget gap amid zero evidence that it's protecting anyone -- in fact, according to a state panel, it may be threatening public safety.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2008 | Michael Rothfeld
The number of homeless sex offenders on parole in California has increased dramatically since the approval two years ago of Proposition 83, an initiative that imposed harsh restrictions on where they can live, a state panel reported Thursday. The Sex Offender Management Board said the number of parolees monitored by the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation -- one of the only government agencies to enforce what is known as Jessica's Law -- increased from 88 in November 2006 to 1,056 at the end of June 2008.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2008 | Charles Piller
The California Assembly unanimously passed a measure Tuesday that would reauthorize the state Department of Mental Health to use private contractors to evaluate sex offenders for mental illness. If a jury confirms the diagnosis, the individuals are committed to a mental hospital indefinitely in lieu of parole. The Senate earlier passed the bill, also unanimously. "Jessica's Law," passed by voters in 2006 as Proposition 83, dramatically increased the number of inmates who must be examined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
SACRAMENTO -- Parole agents today will begin notifying as many as 2,100 recently paroled sex offenders that they have to move because they live too close to schools and parks, in violation of Jessica's Law. Thursday's announcement came a month after officials said they had tentatively concluded that many parolees were violating the law, an initiative approved by voters in November that bars sex offenders from living within 2,000 feet of places where children congregate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2006 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
A ballot measure aiming to restrict where paroled sex offenders may live could drive thousands of them from their homes and place an enormous burden on government, which may have to pay to house the displaced, a draft report by the state corrections department says. The report, obtained by The Times, outlines an array of costs and other consequences that the measure, Proposition 83, could bring for parolees and the communities to which they return after leaving prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2008 | Charles Piller and Lee Romney, Times Staff Writers
When voters overwhelmingly approved Jessica's Law in fall 2006, many assumed it would lock away predatory child molesters and rapists who had slipped through the cracks of existing law. But by key measures, Jessica's Law may be failing to deliver on its promise -- and in some respects producing the opposite of its intended effects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2008 | Charles Piller and Lee Romney, Times Staff Writers
A 2006 law intended to crack down on sex offenders has proved a bonanza for a small group of private psychologists and psychiatrists, 14 of whom billed California taxpayers last year for a half a million dollars or more each, a Times investigation found. Among the 79 contractors hired by the state to evaluate sex offenders, the top earner was Robert Owen, a Central Coast psychologist who pulled in more than $1.5 million in 2007, according to state records reviewed by The Times.
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