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Jessica Tuchman Mathews

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NEWS
October 7, 1989 | RUSHWORTH M. KIDDER, The Christian Science Monitor
"It's changing faster than anything I've ever seen change." Jessica Tuchman Mathews is not talking about her office at the World Resources Institute, now awash with loose folders during what she describes as a redesign of her filing system. She is talking about a much larger redesign: the wholesale shift in the public's attitude toward world environmental issues.
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NEWS
October 7, 1989 | RUSHWORTH M. KIDDER, The Christian Science Monitor
"It's changing faster than anything I've ever seen change." Jessica Tuchman Mathews is not talking about her office at the World Resources Institute, now awash with loose folders during what she describes as a redesign of her filing system. She is talking about a much larger redesign: the wholesale shift in the public's attitude toward world environmental issues.
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NEWS
November 26, 1992 | Paul Houston, Times Staff Writer
GREEN JOBS: After spending most of the last 12 years in the political wilderness, environmental groups are dreaming of a forest-green Clinton Administration. . . . A favorite to head the Environmental Protection Agency is well-positioned: Carol Browner, 36, Florida's secretary of environmental regulation, a former Senate aide to Vice President-elect Al Gore and now his transition chief. . . . Another prime candidate: Madeleine M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1990 | Times Researcher Michael Meyers
A weekly roundup of Southland graduation ceremonies. Wednesday Otis Arts Institute of Parsons School of Design conferred degrees on 163 graduates at its 34th commencement, with 154 receiving a B.F.A., six an M.F.A. and three an A.F.A. degree. Conceptual artist John Baldessari (San Diego State, 1953) delivered the keynote address.
NEWS
October 7, 1997 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton launched a public search Monday for a solution to global warming, declaring that the United States will make an "equitable reduction" in its greenhouse gas emissions if other nations do, too. Spending the morning at a daylong conference on climate change organized by the White House, the president heard largely a "we can do it" message built around high-tech answers to the problem.
NEWS
June 10, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With time running out on Earth Summit negotiators, U.S. delegates Tuesday considered attempting to rewrite portions of a "Rio Declaration" to be issued at the close of the conference, raising the possibility that the controversial document could be destroyed. Although the declaration of general principles for protecting the environment was supposedly completed weeks ago, government delegations and environmental activists have roundly criticized it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1989 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
A bipartisan group of politicians, academics, journalists and public servants gathered at a conference in Claremont this week to wrestle with some big problems facing America's leaders, offering a list that included everything from grinding drug problems to potentially devastating global warming. It is a new, more threatening world out there, wrapped in "interlocking slow-motion crises," summed up Lamont C.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although he has expressed grave reservations about it in the past, President-elect Bill Clinton is coming under strong pressure from close advisers to increase the tax on gasoline as an environmentally beneficial way to raise revenue needed for deficit reductions. The idea figured prominently at this week's two-day economic conference in Little Rock, Ark.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
In the fall of 1986, Bill Moyers, after thinking things over, quit CBS News. If he ever wants to return, his boss said then, quoting a Welsh saying, "We'll keep a welcome in the hillside." That boss, Howard Stringer, now heads the CBS Broadcast Group. David Burke, a former ABC News executive, now heads CBS News. But Moyers remains in the hillside of public TV, professing no thoughts of a return to CBS.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, Times Television Critic
TV is making this the age of brevity, the age of sound bites and life bites, the age of condensing, abridging and fast-forwarding. Shorter is better because it is more marketable, mini-experiences being more salable and enduring commodities in today's culture than miniskirts. Thanks to TV, we're all electronic noshers.
MAGAZINE
November 11, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN and NINA J. EASTON, Ronald Brownstein is a Times political writer. Nina J. Easton writes for The Times ' Calendar section
Break out the champagne. That's the way many Americans feel now that they have two years to recover before the President, members of Congress and hordes of state legislators next ask for their votes. And why not? This was a year filled with dreary campaigns between candidates who seemed incapable of rising above the muck of trivial personal attacks.
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