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Jessica Yu

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1999 | CLAUDINE ISE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When filmmaker Jessica Yu told the New York cabby to drop her off at Creedmoor, his reaction was typical. "You'd better watch your back," he warned her. "Those crazy people are dangerous." In truth, Yu didn't quite know what to expect when she set out to see the Living Museum, a 20,000-square-foot art studio and exhibition space on the grounds of Creedmoor Psychiatric Center in Queens.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
June 13, 2012 | Patt Morrison
If you want to say that Jessica Yu burst onto the film scene in 1993 with her short "Sour Death Balls," you'd be almost literally right. The film is almost 10 minutes of people trying to handle the disgusting confection. Yu's work wins accolades, including a short-documentary Oscar for "Breathing Lessons," about a writer who spent most of his life in an iron lung. Now she's brought her California chops to bear on"Last Call at the Oasis," a feature-length documentary on water waste, water quality and water manipulation not just here - where more than half of our drinkable public water goes to water lawns and plants outside our homes - but the whole, not-so-wet world over.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
WHEN you're drawn to unusual subject matter, says documentary director Jessica Yu, to stories that lack obvious and abundant visual material, "those limitations make you order off the menu." In the case of "Protagonist," Yu's wonderfully accomplished, unexpected and challenging new work, those limitations sent her not just off the menu but to a different restaurant entirely. "I definitely had the sense that this was risky. Puppets speaking ancient Greek -- is this going to make any sense at all?"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Last Call at the Oasis" is a playful title for a film that couldn't be more deadly serious. A thorough examination of the epic crises threatening the world's water supply, crises that few people are paying attention to, this documentary tells you to be afraid, very afraid. Because the water situation is so dire, it has been examined before, in a well-received earlier documentary called "Flow. " But several factors combine to make "Last Call" stand out from the crowd, not the least of it being the surprising artistry with which it's been made.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2007 | KEVIN CRUST
That Jessica Yu, whose documentary "Protagonist" opens Friday, takes a creative, unconventional approach to nonfiction film will come as no surprise to anyone who has been following her career. And even if you haven't, here's a chance to catch up: At the Egyptian Theatre on Sunday, Filmforum is presenting three of Yu's earlier documentary works demonstrating the development of a unique voice. The five-minute short "Sour Death Balls" (online at lumen eclipse.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1998 | John Clark, John Clark is an occasional contributor to Calendar
In a large, loft-like building on a mild, wintry day, a group of artists are preparing their work space for a show. Paintings and sculptures are adjusted. Floors are scrubbed. Lights are strung. A black and white photograph of each artist is hung beside their respective studios, accompanied by a name tag. Absent are the usual pretentious, sermonizing artists' statements describing their work. The art--playful, brooding, provocative--speaks for itself.
OPINION
June 13, 2012 | Patt Morrison
If you want to say that Jessica Yu burst onto the film scene in 1993 with her short "Sour Death Balls," you'd be almost literally right. The film is almost 10 minutes of people trying to handle the disgusting confection. Yu's work wins accolades, including a short-documentary Oscar for "Breathing Lessons," about a writer who spent most of his life in an iron lung. Now she's brought her California chops to bear on"Last Call at the Oasis," a feature-length documentary on water waste, water quality and water manipulation not just here - where more than half of our drinkable public water goes to water lawns and plants outside our homes - but the whole, not-so-wet world over.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2005 | Tommy Nguyen, Special to The Times
Jessica Yu's hotel room lies a few blocks away from Union Square, the hub of a high-end retail district where some of the city's hilliest streets begin to rise. That's why tonight's throngs of after-work shoppers, hauling their shopping bags up the sidewalks with their eyes to the ground, are looking a lot like mountaineers. Yu would never be mistaken for one. She walks briskly with light steps in her long jacket with a furry collar; it's a windy, chilled mid-December evening. "My first P.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Last Call at the Oasis" is a playful title for a film that couldn't be more deadly serious. A thorough examination of the epic crises threatening the world's water supply, crises that few people are paying attention to, this documentary tells you to be afraid, very afraid. Because the water situation is so dire, it has been examined before, in a well-received earlier documentary called "Flow. " But several factors combine to make "Last Call" stand out from the crowd, not the least of it being the surprising artistry with which it's been made.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2003 | Kevin Crust
The Sundance Film Festival announced its lineup in the dramatic and documentary categories Monday, and all are dotted with names familiar to diligent followers of prior festivals and award shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2007 | KEVIN CRUST
That Jessica Yu, whose documentary "Protagonist" opens Friday, takes a creative, unconventional approach to nonfiction film will come as no surprise to anyone who has been following her career. And even if you haven't, here's a chance to catch up: At the Egyptian Theatre on Sunday, Filmforum is presenting three of Yu's earlier documentary works demonstrating the development of a unique voice. The five-minute short "Sour Death Balls" (online at lumen eclipse.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
WHEN you're drawn to unusual subject matter, says documentary director Jessica Yu, to stories that lack obvious and abundant visual material, "those limitations make you order off the menu." In the case of "Protagonist," Yu's wonderfully accomplished, unexpected and challenging new work, those limitations sent her not just off the menu but to a different restaurant entirely. "I definitely had the sense that this was risky. Puppets speaking ancient Greek -- is this going to make any sense at all?"
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2005 | Tommy Nguyen, Special to The Times
Jessica Yu's hotel room lies a few blocks away from Union Square, the hub of a high-end retail district where some of the city's hilliest streets begin to rise. That's why tonight's throngs of after-work shoppers, hauling their shopping bags up the sidewalks with their eyes to the ground, are looking a lot like mountaineers. Yu would never be mistaken for one. She walks briskly with light steps in her long jacket with a furry collar; it's a windy, chilled mid-December evening. "My first P.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1999 | CLAUDINE ISE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When filmmaker Jessica Yu told the New York cabby to drop her off at Creedmoor, his reaction was typical. "You'd better watch your back," he warned her. "Those crazy people are dangerous." In truth, Yu didn't quite know what to expect when she set out to see the Living Museum, a 20,000-square-foot art studio and exhibition space on the grounds of Creedmoor Psychiatric Center in Queens.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1998 | John Clark, John Clark is an occasional contributor to Calendar
In a large, loft-like building on a mild, wintry day, a group of artists are preparing their work space for a show. Paintings and sculptures are adjusted. Floors are scrubbed. Lights are strung. A black and white photograph of each artist is hung beside their respective studios, accompanied by a name tag. Absent are the usual pretentious, sermonizing artists' statements describing their work. The art--playful, brooding, provocative--speaks for itself.
BOOKS
June 15, 1997
Barbara J. Salice, executive director, Literacy Network of Greater Los Angeles: "Being Red," by Howard Fast (M.E. Sharpe). "After reading this unnerving account of how the communist witch hunt in the 1950s almost destroyed Fast professionally and personally, I was struck by the contradictions of his life. He lived in luxury yet still espoused radical beliefs." **** Jessica Yu, filmmaker: "Why People Believe Weird Things," by Michael Shermer (W.H. Freeman).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1997
Visual Effects: Volker Engel, Douglas Smith, Clay Pinney and Joseph Viskocil, "Independence Day." * Film Editing: "The English Patient," Walter Murch. * Cinematography: "The English Patient," John Seale. * Foreign Film: "Kolya," Czech Republic. * Original Song: "You Must Love Me" from "Evita," Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice. * Documentary Feature: "When We Were Kings," Leon Gast and David Sonenberg.
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