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Jessie Larez

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1989
A federal judge has upheld the $170,014 jury award against Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl F. Gates in the case of an East Los Angeles man whose nose was broken by police officers. Attorneys for both Gates and the plaintiffs said the verdict was the first in the nation to hold liable the active police chief of a major city for excessive force committed by his officers. U.S. District Judge Robert Takasugi rejected the city's request to set aside the verdict reached by a six-member federal court jury last fall in favor of Jessie Larez, his wife and five children over a June 13, 1986, raid on their home.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1989
A federal judge has upheld the $170,014 jury award against Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl F. Gates in the case of an East Los Angeles man whose nose was broken by police officers. Attorneys for both Gates and the plaintiffs said the verdict was the first in the nation to hold liable the active police chief of a major city for excessive force committed by his officers. U.S. District Judge Robert Takasugi rejected the city's request to set aside the verdict reached by a six-member federal court jury last fall in favor of Jessie Larez, his wife and five children over a June 13, 1986, raid on their home.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1989 | KIM MURPHY and DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writers
The FBI has launched a formal investigation to determine whether six Los Angeles police officers criminally violated the civil rights of an East Los Angeles family during a search of the family's home, a Justice Department spokeswoman said Tuesday. Department officials referred the case Feb. 1 to the FBI's Los Angeles field office, said Deborah Burstion-Wade, the spokeswoman in Washington. "It's an open matter, which means we are looking at the case," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1989 | KIM MURPHY and DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writers
The FBI has launched a formal investigation to determine whether six Los Angeles police officers criminally violated the civil rights of an East Los Angeles family during a search of the family's home, a Justice Department spokeswoman said Tuesday. Department officials referred the case Feb. 1 to the FBI's Los Angeles field office, said Deborah Burstion-Wade, the spokeswoman in Washington. "It's an open matter, which means we are looking at the case," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1988 | DAVID FREED and RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writers
Meeting in closed session, the Los Angeles City Council appropriated $255,000 Wednesday to pay a court-ordered judgment against Police Chief Daryl F. Gates after six of his officers roughed up an East Los Angeles family while searching for a murder weapon. City officials said that although they still plan to appeal the landmark $170,000 judgment, which a U.S. District Court jury handed down earlier this month against Gates, they appropriated the funds should the city ultimately lose its appeal.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1988
In response to "A Question of Respect: Judgment Against Gates Makes Statement for Minority Rights," Op-Ed Page, Dec. 7: According to Henry McGee's account, the incident in June, 1986, began in the morning when police entered Jessie Larez's home in search of a gun that had "purportedly" been used in a murder. I presume the police had a search warrant. After entering the house, Larez "rushed" police, struck one officer in the chest, and was subsequently subdued "kicking and screaming."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1991 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City Councilwoman Joy Picus won a round in her legal dispute over Warner Ridge development Friday when a judge rejected a motion by property owners that Picus be held personally liable for any damages awarded in their $100-million lawsuit against the city. Superior Court Judge Kathryn Doi Todd refused to allow Picus to be a defendant in the lawsuit by Warner Ridge Associates, saying a legal deadline had expired.
NEWS
December 24, 1988 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
A group of Latino community activists Friday condemned the City Council's decision to bail out Police Chief Daryl F. Gates from having to personally pay $170,000 to an East Los Angeles family that was roughed up by his officers. Representatives of the Mexican American Political Assn., the United Farm Workers and other groups accused the council of insensitivity to Latinos and reiterated their call for Mayor Tom Bradley to fire Gates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1988 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Making a rare appearance in federal court, Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl F. Gates on Tuesday defended the methods his officers use when executing search warrants and said that police officials diligently investigate when searches result in citizens' complaints. Gates spent nearly three hours testifying in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court Friday overturned a punitive damages award of $170,000 against Police Chief Daryl F. Gates in a technical ruling that ironically creates the possibility of an even larger damage award against the chief. The U. S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals said that Gates was entitled to a new trial stemming from a 1986 raid at an Eastside home by police officers who were looking for a weapon allegedly used in a gang killing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1988 | DAVID FREED and RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writers
Meeting in closed session, the Los Angeles City Council appropriated $255,000 Wednesday to pay a court-ordered judgment against Police Chief Daryl F. Gates after six of his officers roughed up an East Los Angeles family while searching for a murder weapon. City officials said that although they still plan to appeal the landmark $170,000 judgment, which a U.S. District Court jury handed down earlier this month against Gates, they appropriated the funds should the city ultimately lose its appeal.
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For three miles, the police officers chased the car, sirens blaring. When the suspect finally stopped, as the officers would explain it later, he ignored their orders and tried to bull his way past them. Five bystanders told a starkly different story: the policemen beat and kicked an unarmed black man as he lay on the street. It was not Rodney G. King whom the witnesses saw being pummeled that night in 1988, but a suspected auto thief named Tyrone Demetri Carey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1989 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, Times Staff Writer
The former police liaison for Mayor Tom Bradley has filed a harassment complaint against two Los Angeles police officers who he claims pushed him around, illegally searched him and then wrote up a bogus traffic citation. Kerman Maddox, a member of the local board of the National Assn.
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