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Jessika Wood

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MAGAZINE
September 24, 2000 | BARBARA THORNBURG
Jessika Wood can't remember a time when she didn't draw, paint or make small sculptures. At age 5, living on a chicken farm in the Australian outback with her mom, landscape designer Susan Wood, she decorated their barn door with stars. Wood also recalls childhood visits with her father, German-born artist Roger Herman, in his Oakland studio "with all the paper, pens and paint a kid could ever dream of."
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MAGAZINE
September 24, 2000 | BARBARA THORNBURG
Jessika Wood can't remember a time when she didn't draw, paint or make small sculptures. At age 5, living on a chicken farm in the Australian outback with her mom, landscape designer Susan Wood, she decorated their barn door with stars. Wood also recalls childhood visits with her father, German-born artist Roger Herman, in his Oakland studio "with all the paper, pens and paint a kid could ever dream of."
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MAGAZINE
September 24, 2000 | BARBARA THORNBURG
For Roger Herman, building a house is like making a piece of art: first comes the vision, then the refinements. "When I make a woodblock I have an image in mind," says the painter, printmaker, ceramist and professor of painting at UCLA's Department of Art. "I paint on wood and then start cutting it out, [but] I still don't know how it's going to look. Then I print and, depending on the paper and inks, it takes on a different appearance. "Then there are always the surprises," he adds.
MAGAZINE
September 24, 2000 | BARBARA THORNBURG
For Roger Herman, building a house is like making a piece of art: first comes the vision, then the refinements. "When I make a woodblock I have an image in mind," says the painter, printmaker, ceramist and professor of painting at UCLA's Department of Art. "I paint on wood and then start cutting it out, [but] I still don't know how it's going to look. Then I print and, depending on the paper and inks, it takes on a different appearance. "Then there are always the surprises," he adds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2004 | Jason Felch and Arlene Martinez, Times Staff Writers
When Councilman Eric Garcetti appeared at a Hollywood hot dog shop Friday to announce a proposal to exempt hybrid vehicles from city parking meters, he may have gotten a bit ahead of himself. As the press conference came to a close, his fiancee's 2004 Toyota Prius hybrid vehicle sat nearby in front of an expired parking meter. A bike-riding parking enforcement officer saw it and began to write a ticket. An aide to Mayor James K.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1996 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At L.A. Louver Gallery, a sharply focused selection of sketchbook-size drawings by Richard Diebenkorn (1922-1993) emphasizes the links between the renowned artist's abstract landscapes and his more intimate studies of the female figure.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1995 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
'There was no art scene when I got here in 1946," recalls pioneering art dealer Paul Kantor, who was to spend the next 48 years attempting to change that. "I was a 28-year-old kid just out of the Navy, and I got into this business not really intending to. "It took very little money to open a gallery in the late '40s--rent was just a few hundred dollars a month," says Kantor in an interview at his Beverly Hills home.
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