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November 17, 1989 | Richard Boudreaux and Marjorie Miller, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
The rector of El Salvador's Jesuit-run university and five other Jesuit priests were murdered Thursday in a pre-dawn raid on their campus dormitory, apparently by gunmen in military uniform who rousted them from their sleep. The shootings, which occurred during a dusk-to-dawn curfew in an army-occupied neighborhood, stunned a nation already brutalized by six days of the deadliest urban combat of a decade-old guerrilla war. They came as the government's heaviest air strikes drove tens of thousands from their homes in the capital.
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WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT -- A Dutch priest who lived in Syria for almost five decades and refused to evacuate this year from the rebel-held Old City area of Homs was shot and killed at his residence early Monday, according to official accounts. Father Frans Van der Lugt was eulogized by the Vatican as a “man of peace” who stayed behind in the ravaged Old City to assist a dwindling population of Christians and Muslims suffering the devastating effects of an almost two-year siege. Like Pope Francis, he was a Jesuit.
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WORLD
July 8, 2012 | Patrick J. McDonnell
Resplendent in black cassock and matching skullcap, the bearded Jesuit appears in a YouTube video breaking bread with opposition activists and donating blood at a makeshift rebel clinic, highlighting his solidarity with the Syrian rebellion. But Father Paolo Dall'Oglio, a brawny bear of a man who enunciates each word with a theatrical sense of certitude, scoffs at the "jihad priest" label. He says he remains committed to a peaceful resolution of the conflict in his adopted homeland -- a "jihad of the spirit, not a jihad of arms," as he declared during a recent stay in the rebel-occupied Syrian town of Qusair.
WORLD
September 20, 2013 | By Mitchell Landsberg
Popes are famously believed to be endowed with infallibility, which is often misinterpreted to mean that they can never be wrong. In actuality, they are only considered infallible when it comes to the issuance of Roman Catholic doctrine. Infallible or not, popes are not immune to dissent, disagreement, even ridicule. But it's hard to find any of those sentiments in response to Pope Francis' wide-ranging interview with a Jesuit magazine, which hit the Catholic world like a thunderbolt Thursday.
BOOKS
January 3, 1988 | Richard J. Woods, On the gaduate faculty of Loyola University (Chicago), Woods is director of the Center for Religion and society , editor of "Spirituality Today" and author of "Eckhart's Way" (Glazier).
Toward the end of his largely autobiographical tour of "the consciousness movement" of the late 1970s and the '80s, David Toolan compares himself to missionary-explorers of the late 16th Century such as Roberto de Nobili and Matteo Ricci, who ventured into India, China and Japan to export the blessings of Western civilization and Catholicism but also to discover the mysteries of the Orient. The simile is multiply apt. Not only were Ricci and De Nobili also Jesuits but, as Jonathan Spence pointed out in "The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci," despite their single-mindedness, the initial enthusiasm of these tough-minded scholars gave way year by year to disillusionment and the disaffection of culture shock.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1992
Better wolf's clothing or cross dressing than no clothes at all. The worst mistake that the Bush Administration makes is to continually insult the majority of voters; and we have heard quite enough from the Jesuit jingler. GEORGE YORG Playa del Rey
NEWS
January 3, 1986 | From Reuters
Guyana's left-wing government has deported a British-born Jesuit priest who defied an order to leave the country by Dec. 31, church officials said here Thursday. Father Patrick Conners, 51, who has lived in Guyana since 1966, was ordered to leave the former British colony last month amid worsening relations between church and state.
WORLD
October 30, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Two Roman Catholic priests were slain in the apartment where they lived in an upmarket district of Moscow, investigators said. Victor Betancourt, a Jesuit priest from Ecuador, was killed in the apartment Saturday and Otto Messmer, a Russian who led the country's Jesuits, was killed there two days later after returning from a trip out of the country, their order said in Rome. The two priests had head injuries, the Investigative Committee of the Russian Prosecutor-General's Office said in a statement.
OPINION
March 30, 2002
Re "Cloak of Silence Covered Abuse at Jesuit Retreat," March 24: Surely there must be a mistake! Can Fathers Thomas Smolich and Greg Aherne, current and former Jesuit superiors, really subscribe to the ethical position that they need not report to authorities molestations of mentally impaired human beings under their watch because the victims are not minors? How can they ethically justify sending sexual predators to live at Bellarmine High School and Santa Clara University, where adolescents are the majority population?
WORLD
September 20, 2013 | By Mitchell Landsberg
Popes are famously believed to be endowed with infallibility, which is often misinterpreted to mean that they can never be wrong. In actuality, they are only considered infallible when it comes to the issuance of Roman Catholic doctrine. Infallible or not, popes are not immune to dissent, disagreement, even ridicule. But it's hard to find any of those sentiments in response to Pope Francis' wide-ranging interview with a Jesuit magazine, which hit the Catholic world like a thunderbolt Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
Cool guy, that new pope. Wish those House Republicans would spend some time studying the interview Pope Francis gave to the Italian Jesuit journal La Civita Cattolica that was published online by America, a U.S.-based Jesuit publication. They might learn a few things about compassion, priorities and how to be real Christians. Francis thinks the church, to its detriment, is “obsessed” with its battles against abortion, gay marriage and contraception. “The teaching of the church is clear,” he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2013 | By Scarlet Cheng
A picture may be worth a thousand words, but this one has inspired many more, because it has become a departure point for how Europeans became acquainted with Asia. When the Getty acquired an 17th century drawing by Flemish artist Peter Paul Rubens, "Man in Korean Costume," at a 1983 auction, it was already well known among the cognoscenti. Then six years ago Getty curator Stephanie Schrader learned that it had inspired two books in Korea - a bestselling novel in 1993 and a nonfiction volume by a Jesuit historian in 2004.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
The young inmates in a Los Angeles County juvenile detention facility are an ocean apart from the most powerful man in the world's largest church. But this week, they were linked in an Easter Week rite of healing and humility 2 millennia old. Pope Francis chose to celebrate Holy Thursday by sinking to his knees to wash and kiss the feet of a dozen youth inmates in an Italian juvenile jail - breaking from the tradition of performing that ritual with priests in the ornate cathedrals of Rome.
WORLD
March 18, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
VATICAN CITY - Few people were more shocked at the choice of a Jesuit as pope than the Jesuits. There had never been a Jesuit pope before Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina was elected last week, and he was the only Jesuit among the 115 cardinals who voted in the papal conclave. (The only other one, from Indonesia, was too ill to attend.) Pope Francis, who will be installed formally Tuesday before more than 100 heads of state and foreign delegations, including Vice President Joe Biden and what will undoubtedly be an adoring crowd, has already shown himself to be a different kind of pope.
OPINION
March 17, 2013
Re "Argentina's 'dirty war' wounds still raw," March 15 That Jorge Mario Bergoglio is the person I now have to address as Pope Francis is a very disturbing proposition for a person like me who survived Argentina's 'dirty war.' I wasn't surprised when the cardinals chose someone who has the conservative views of his predecessor, but it is astonishing that they selected a man who at best remained silent when Argentina's military kidnapped, tortured...
WORLD
March 14, 2013 | By Tom Kington, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
VATICAN CITY -- The Jesuits gave a warm welcome Thursday to the election of Pope Francis, the first pope from their order, and suggested that he will be committed to evangelizing and to reforming the Roman Catholic Church. The election of Jorge Mario Bergoglio on Wednesday as pope “opens a path full of hope,” the Jesuits' superior general, Father Adolfo Nicolas, said in a statement released Thursday. [For the Record, 11:20 a.m. March 14: An earlier version of this post gave the last name of Father Adolfo Nicolas as Nicolais.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
Cool guy, that new pope. Wish those House Republicans would spend some time studying the interview Pope Francis gave to the Italian Jesuit journal La Civita Cattolica that was published online by America, a U.S.-based Jesuit publication. They might learn a few things about compassion, priorities and how to be real Christians. Francis thinks the church, to its detriment, is “obsessed” with its battles against abortion, gay marriage and contraception. “The teaching of the church is clear,” he said.
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT -- A Dutch priest who lived in Syria for almost five decades and refused to evacuate this year from the rebel-held Old City area of Homs was shot and killed at his residence early Monday, according to official accounts. Father Frans Van der Lugt was eulogized by the Vatican as a “man of peace” who stayed behind in the ravaged Old City to assist a dwindling population of Christians and Muslims suffering the devastating effects of an almost two-year siege. Like Pope Francis, he was a Jesuit.
WORLD
March 14, 2013 | By Tom Kington, Los Angeles Times
VATICAN CITY - In a busy first full day as head of the Roman Catholic Church, Pope Francis on Thursday showed that he intends to shun the trappings of high office and introduce a humble note to the papacy. The 76-year-old pontiff returned to the clerical residence in Rome where he had stayed before the papal conclave to pick up his luggage and settle his bill. "He paid the bill to set a good example," Vatican spokesman Father Federico Lombardi said. Driven around Rome in a Vatican car without an escort, Francis also showed up at the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore   with little notice to offer a bouquet of flowers and pray.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2013 | By David Horsey
For the first time in history, the Roman Catholic Church has a pope from the New World, but liberal American Catholics should not expect Pope Francis to stray far from the old theology. Some things are excitingly different about this new pontiff. On matters of birth control, abortion, homosexuality, celibate priests and the role of women in the church, however, he is no revolutionary. When Argentina's Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio stepped out on the Vatican balcony as the new pope on Wednesday evening, all he was required to do was wave and give a blessing.
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