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Jesuit Volunteer Corps

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1990 | RON SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since she began volunteering at the St. Joseph DropIn Center in Venice, Monica Steigerwald felt threatened. One of her clients, a paranoid schizophrenic, was convinced a monster had invaded his body. Standing near the slender 23-year-old woman, he began hyperventilating and acting hysterically. Suddenly the client grabbed a knife and began brandishing it frantically in the air--before stabbing himself several times in the chest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1992 | From Religious News Service
Jeff Strickland was a student at Loyola Marymount College in Los Angeles when he heard about a volunteer program that changed the course of his life. The sociology major joined a Jesuit volunteer corps in 1989 and was sent to Philadelphia, where he taught for a year at an inner-city school. Three years later, he is still there, teaching eighth-grade science.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1992 | From Religious News Service
Jeff Strickland was a student at Loyola Marymount College in Los Angeles when he heard about a volunteer program that changed the course of his life. The sociology major joined a Jesuit volunteer corps in 1989 and was sent to Philadelphia, where he taught for a year at an inner-city school. Three years later, he is still there, teaching eighth-grade science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1990 | RON SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since she began volunteering at the St. Joseph DropIn Center in Venice, Monica Steigerwald felt threatened. One of her clients, a paranoid schizophrenic, was convinced a monster had invaded his body. Standing near the slender 23-year-old woman, he began hyperventilating and acting hysterically. Suddenly the client grabbed a knife and began brandishing it frantically in the air--before stabbing himself several times in the chest.
NEWS
May 28, 1995 | SEAN WATERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mike Kearney has resigned from Verbum Dei High School, leaving its state champion basketball team without a coach. Kearney, who this year led the team to its first-ever state Division IV title, said he no longer feels he can do his job effectively as teacher and coach under the school administration. "I'm leaving because I'm dissatisfied with the direction of the school," Kearney said on Wednesday. "I'm not confident in the leadership." Kearney declined to elaborate.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | PAULA FRIEDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
FIVE-FINGER DISCOUNT A Crooked Family History by Helene Stapinski Random House $23.95, 239 pages * "The night my grandfather tried to kill us, I was 5 years old, the age I stopped believing in Santa Claus, started kindergarten and made real rather than imaginary friends."
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | CHARLES SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Twenty-seven hundred miles is a long way to travel on a whim. But for Verbum Dei basketball Coach Mike Kearney, no distance was too great if it meant being one step closer to fulfilling his dream of teaching at the high school whose team he has admired since childhood. Instead of practicing law in New Jersey after graduating from George Mason University Law School in Virginia as he had intended, Kearney volunteered for one year as a teacher at Verbum Dei High School in South-Central.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | DAVID LAMB, Times Staff Writer
Father Jim Poole was in Fat Freddie's cafe, poking at his salad without enthusiasm. He'd have much rather ordered his favorite lunch--a burger and fries--but a diet is a diet, he said, and he learned long ago that discipline is an important element of survival and contentment in Nome. The conversation turned from food to the award-winning nonprofit radio station Poole operates with a dozen young volunteers from the "Lower 48."
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | SEAN WATERS, Michael and Kimberly Kearney were each planning careers in law when they met while working as clerks for the same firm in New Jersey. But they chose to alter their professional paths. Michael, the son of a judge, joined the Jesuit Volunteer Corps, where he was assigned a teaching position at Verbum Dei High School in 1988-89. Completing his seventh year at the school, Kearney is now the varsity basketball coach and head of the English Department. Kimberly, who taught English for 2 1/2 years at Verbum Dei, is now a third-grade teacher at Dolores Mission Elementary School in East Los Angeles. The couple have been married for four years. Here is one couple's decision to spurn law careers to work with inner-city youths. They were interviewed by Sean Waters.
Mike: When I finished law school at George Mason University in Virginia, I decided I wanted to do a year's volunteer work. I originally had hoped to go spend the year at Belize in Central America. But that fell through. Initially I had a job lined up in the criminal courts in Newark, N.J. But that was deferred for a year so I could join the Jesuit Volunteer Corps.
NEWS
October 27, 1998 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Maria Dzida has grown accustomed to begging--for food, for candy, for socks, for money, for anything she can use to serve the hungry and the homeless who come to the Loaves and Fishes soup kitchen. For nine years, Dzida has volunteered to run the kitchen, which serves a hot lunch every Saturday to 300 to 400 people at St. Joseph Parish school in Santa Ana. Because of her efforts to secure donations of all kinds, Loaves and Fishes has a reputation as a gourmet soup kitchen.
NEWS
November 15, 1986 | HEIDI YORKSHIRE
Locals call it "The Nickel"--5th Street, Skid Row's major thoroughfare. On a recent Saturday morning, shabbily dressed men crowded the litter-strewn sidewalks. Many were drinking from bottles hidden in crumpled brown paper bags. Drug dealers and their clients flashed rolls of bills and exchanged merchandise, evidently unconcerned by a police station just across the street.
NEWS
December 5, 1985 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
By 7:30 on a cold, rainy morning, the small crowd gathered outside the Chrysalis Center on Skid Row's 5th and Wall streets was already shifting and murmuring in discomfort, vying for a spot in the recessed doorway. They were waiting for their chance at some clothing, bedding or food, and a lucky few, the very early arrivals, were already inside. The others had been issued numbers.
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