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NEWS
May 26, 1992 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A framed photo of the happy couple on their wedding day stands on a living room table, the bride in a traditional white gown, the groom in a tux. They live in a cozy house with a white picket fence, flowers and a big dog. The wife serves coffee and cheerfully disappears.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
The young inmates in a Los Angeles County juvenile detention facility are an ocean apart from the most powerful man in the world's largest church. But this week, they were linked in an Easter Week rite of healing and humility 2 millennia old. Pope Francis chose to celebrate Holy Thursday by sinking to his knees to wash and kiss the feet of a dozen youth inmates in an Italian juvenile jail - breaking from the tradition of performing that ritual with priests in the ornate cathedrals of Rome.
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WORLD
March 14, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
As a Jesuit, Pope Francis comes from a religious order that traditionally shuns such high office - one key reason the Argentine is the first Jesuit to lead the vast Roman Catholic Church, scholars say. “We don't usually feel called to do that,” said Father T. Frank Kennedy, director of the Jesuit Institute at Boston College. “In our final vows, we promise not to seek church offices. It's only when the Holy Father orders us to do it that we accept.” Avoiding such ecclesiastical honors is one major trait of the Jesuits, formally known as the Society of Jesus.
WORLD
March 19, 2013 | By Henry Chu
VATICAN CITY - Huge crowds gathered in St. Peter's Square and spilled into side streets Tuesday morning as Pope Francis prepared for his official inauguration as leader of the Roman Catholic Church and its 1.2 billion followers. Up to a million people are expected to jam into and around this tiny city-state to witness the highly ceremonial event, which will also be attended by royalty, government leaders and religious figures from around the world. Pilgrims began camping out overnight to claim a spot from which to watch the installation of the 266th pope in the church's history and the first from the Americas.
WORLD
March 14, 2013 | By Tom Kington, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
VATICAN CITY -- The Jesuits gave a warm welcome Thursday to the election of Pope Francis, the first pope from their order, and suggested that he will be committed to evangelizing and to reforming the Roman Catholic Church. The election of Jorge Mario Bergoglio on Wednesday as pope “opens a path full of hope,” the Jesuits' superior general, Father Adolfo Nicolas, said in a statement released Thursday. [For the Record, 11:20 a.m. March 14: An earlier version of this post gave the last name of Father Adolfo Nicolas as Nicolais.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1987 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
It is not surprising that the only radio station in Los Angeles that would play songs entitled "Locust Abortion Technician" or "The Catholics Are Attacking" is one run entirely by students at a local university. What does seem curious, though, is that KXLU-FM (88.9), L.A.'s one true champion of underground rock music, is owned and financed by the Jesuit priests at Loyola Marymount University. "It does seem bizarre," says Mark Morris, 23, who was general manager until he graduated last month.
NEWS
April 25, 2001 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In an escalating conflict between religious pluralism and Roman Catholic orthodoxy, the Vatican is investigating an American Jesuit theologian who proposed, in an award-winning book, that people can find salvation by means other than Jesus Christ. The Vatican placed the Rev. Roger Haight on leave last fall from his teaching post at Weston Jesuit School of Theology in Cambridge, Mass., during the investigation of his 1999 book, "Jesus Symbol of God."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1987
"The Mission," a story about Jesuits in 18th-Century South America and an Oscar nominee for "best picture," received a Gold Angel during the 10th Angel Awards in Los Angeles for media productions with moral and spiritual impact.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A ninth soldier was arrested in connection with the slaying of six Jesuit priests and two others after he fled from a courtroom last Friday during questioning, military sources said. The order to arrest Sgt. Oscar Armando Solorzano came after he "was caught giving false testimony and contradicted himself several times" while testifying as a witness in the controversial case, a court spokesman said. Solorzano is a member of the commando unit of the elite U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1996 | From Associated Press
Not about to play devil's advocate, the University of San Francisco has finally pulled the plug on its 666 telephone prefix. The Catholic school suffered through bad jokes for years because of the number, known as the mark of the beast in the Book of Revelation, the 13th chapter of which reads, "Then I saw another beast that rose out of the earth; it had two horns like a lamb and spoke like a dragon. . . . Its number is six hundred sixty-six." (Rev. 13:11-18.
WORLD
March 18, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
VATICAN CITY - Few people were more shocked at the choice of a Jesuit as pope than the Jesuits. There had never been a Jesuit pope before Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina was elected last week, and he was the only Jesuit among the 115 cardinals who voted in the papal conclave. (The only other one, from Indonesia, was too ill to attend.) Pope Francis, who will be installed formally Tuesday before more than 100 heads of state and foreign delegations, including Vice President Joe Biden and what will undoubtedly be an adoring crowd, has already shown himself to be a different kind of pope.
WORLD
March 15, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
BUENOS AIRES - For the last two days here “it's been all pope, everything pope. In the streets, in the cafes, on the corners, everyone's talking about the pope,” said Fernando Vignoles, a thirtysomething cab driver and longtime resident of Argentina's capital. From the freeway late Thursday night, Vignoles proudly pointed into the darkness to the outline of a handsome old church where the man now known as Pope Francis, the former archbishop of Buenos Aires, had presided over his confirmation ceremony as a young man. “He's a good guy, a really good guy,” he said.
WORLD
March 14, 2013 | By Tom Kington, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
VATICAN CITY -- The Jesuits gave a warm welcome Thursday to the election of Pope Francis, the first pope from their order, and suggested that he will be committed to evangelizing and to reforming the Roman Catholic Church. The election of Jorge Mario Bergoglio on Wednesday as pope “opens a path full of hope,” the Jesuits' superior general, Father Adolfo Nicolas, said in a statement released Thursday. [For the Record, 11:20 a.m. March 14: An earlier version of this post gave the last name of Father Adolfo Nicolas as Nicolais.
WORLD
March 14, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
As a Jesuit, Pope Francis comes from a religious order that traditionally shuns such high office - one key reason the Argentine is the first Jesuit to lead the vast Roman Catholic Church, scholars say. “We don't usually feel called to do that,” said Father T. Frank Kennedy, director of the Jesuit Institute at Boston College. “In our final vows, we promise not to seek church offices. It's only when the Holy Father orders us to do it that we accept.” Avoiding such ecclesiastical honors is one major trait of the Jesuits, formally known as the Society of Jesus.
WORLD
March 14, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
VATICAN CITY - From his willingness to cook his own meals and get around by bus, to his choice of St. Francis as inspiration for his name, the new pope has stressed humility and a simple life that could signal a change in tone at the center of the Roman Catholic Church. Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Buenos Aires, 76, is the first person from the Americas and the first Jesuit to be elected pope. The son of a railway worker, he rose to become regional superior of the Jesuit order in Argentina and then an archbishop, spending most of his career teaching priests and advocating for the poor through times of economic crisis in his home nation.
WORLD
March 13, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Roman Catholic cardinals chose Jorge Mario Bergoglio as pope Wednesday, selecting the Argentine Jesuit to succeed Pope Benedict XVI, who resigned Feb. 28, and lead 1.2 billion church followers around the globe. He was chosen after five rounds of voting in the Sistine Chapel. Bergoglio, who chose the papal name Francis I, is the first Jesuit pope and has spent nearly his entire career in Argentina, overseeing churches and shoe-leather priests. The Associated Press described him as a modernizer who has lived austerely.
NEWS
December 25, 1991 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Decrying "the poverty of our preaching," one of the Roman Catholic Church's most prominent figures has launched a national project to "fill priests' bellies with fire" as the first step toward prodding congregations to do more about social problems. Father Walter J.
NEWS
January 6, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The independent-minded Jesuits, the largest and most influential order of Roman Catholic priests, opened a worldwide congress here Thursday under papal injunction to be "totally and without reservation of the church, in the church and for the church." Addressing 223 delegates to the 34th congregation of the activist Society of Jesus, Pope John Paul II lauded the Jesuits for their global contribution to learning and education.
WORLD
July 8, 2012 | Patrick J. McDonnell
Resplendent in black cassock and matching skullcap, the bearded Jesuit appears in a YouTube video breaking bread with opposition activists and donating blood at a makeshift rebel clinic, highlighting his solidarity with the Syrian rebellion. But Father Paolo Dall'Oglio, a brawny bear of a man who enunciates each word with a theatrical sense of certitude, scoffs at the "jihad priest" label. He says he remains committed to a peaceful resolution of the conflict in his adopted homeland -- a "jihad of the spirit, not a jihad of arms," as he declared during a recent stay in the rebel-occupied Syrian town of Qusair.
NATIONAL
February 10, 2012 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
Emily moved from Los Angeles to New York for law school with more health worries than your average 26-year-old. She had lost one ovary to a tumor, had polyps cut from her uterus, and faced a greater risk of developing cancer in her remaining ovary unless she took birth control pills. When Emily visited the student health services center at Jesuit-run Fordham University, however, she could not get her prescription filled. The situation facing Emily, who did not want her full name used for privacy reasons, highlights the dilemma at religious-based institutions, which are caught up in the debate over whether health insurance should cover contraception.
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