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Jesus And Mary Chain

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December 21, 1985 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
The Jesus And Mary Chain is not a gospel group. That much was clear Thursday night at Safari Sam's in Huntington Beach. Less certain for many of the curious who turned out for this controversial Scottish band's local debut (it'll also be at the Roxy on Monday night) was whether Mary Chain was a legitimate rock group.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2007 | Chuck Mindenhall, Special to The Times
Perhaps the Jesus and Mary Chain was the first band to truly capture the art of sounding like bad radio reception, but the white noise from which singer Jim Reid's power-yearn emits is still very much tuned in. This is evident in the first single that the Scottish group has released in nearly a decade, "All Things Must Pass," which thundered Monday at the Anaheim House of Blues audience like a lost track from "Psychocandy."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1994 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI
Scottish brothers Jim and William Reid of the Jesus and Mary Chain began their career a decade ago, burying delicate melodies under countless strata of distorted guitar. They're a few links further along their fraternal chain these days and are now content to let their languorous, lovelorn pop tunes jangle without any noisy embellishment.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2007 | GEOFF BOUCHER
The last time I saw Glenn Frey onstage he pointed out that L.A. has the richest people in the world who don't expect to pay for tickets. Wait until he sees the band's guest list for tonight as the Eagles and Dixie Chicks open the Nokia Theatre. . . . Everyone in town wants to see the place. After an early tour, I can tell you the sightlines are amazing -- but are those fancy lights in the bathrooms supposed to look like rolls of toilet paper? . . .
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | BILL LOCEY
The Scottish rockers The Jesus and Mary Chain probably won't get a lot of work doing Optimist Club fund-raisers. Not with songs such as "Head On" which features lyrics such as: "And the way I feel tonight I could die and I wouldn't mind. And there's something going on inside. Makes you want to feel makes you want to try. Makes you want to blow the stars from the sky. I can't stand up I can't cool down. I can't get my head off the ground."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1992 | RICHARD CROMELIN
There are bands that go about the routine business of making individual, personal music, and then there are bands that are called to channel an eternal spirit of rock 'n' roll. The Jesus and Mary Chain is the conduit right now, and the stuff roars through the band and sounds as fresh as when it bled from the Velvet Underground in the '60s and when the Modern Lovers renewed it and the Ramones accelerated it during the '70s.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
The 2007 Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival is turning out to be the Great Reunion in the Desert. The Jesus and Mary Chain, the volatile Scottish cult favorite that called it quits in 1998, will perform together at the April 27-29 concert in Indio, joining Rage Against the Machine and Crowded House as notable outfits coming back together to play under the banner of the festival. Tickets go on sale Saturday through Ticketmaster; three-day passes will cost $249.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This appreciation isn't for a deceased musician, but for a departed band. The Jesus and Mary Chain, one of the most exciting and influential rock groups of the last 20 years, officially called it quits in 1998, but it disappeared from the pop scene so quietly that no one had a chance to offer farewell.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1995
Your Blur vs. Oasis article ("The Battle of Britain," by Robert Hilburn, Oct. 1) was paper wasted on two pointless groups who are to England what the New Kids on the Block were to America: mindless pop music for boy-crazy teen-age girls. To say that English music of the '80s seemed "superficial and weightless" is utterly ridiculous. New Order, the Jesus and Mary Chain, the Smiths, Echo & the Bunnymen and the Stone Roses made some of the greatest music of the decade. New English bands such as Portishead, the Chemical Brothers, Swervedriver, Massive Attack and Aphex Twin continue to make fantastically innovative music, but punk-obsessed American alternative music fans couldn't care less.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1989 | RICHARD CROMELIN
The brothers Reid have made an art form of abrasiveness: a first album that dragged you through thickets of distortion to reach the sweetness at the center. Concerts marked by indifferent delivery and unpredictable (usually short) duration. Mumbling interviews. There's something refreshingly real about these surly, semi-articulate Scots and their pursuit of an eccentric ideal of pop perfection. They might have hit it with their third album.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
The 2007 Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival is turning out to be the Great Reunion in the Desert. The Jesus and Mary Chain, the volatile Scottish cult favorite that called it quits in 1998, will perform together at the April 27-29 concert in Indio, joining Rage Against the Machine and Crowded House as notable outfits coming back together to play under the banner of the festival. Tickets go on sale Saturday through Ticketmaster; three-day passes will cost $249.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This appreciation isn't for a deceased musician, but for a departed band. The Jesus and Mary Chain, one of the most exciting and influential rock groups of the last 20 years, officially called it quits in 1998, but it disappeared from the pop scene so quietly that no one had a chance to offer farewell.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1998 | Jerry Crowe, Jerry Crowe is a Times staff writer
Rock music acts from Elvis Presley to Nirvana have vaulted from small, independent record companies to major labels on their way to the Top 10. But the Jesus and Mary Chain, the Scottish band whose mixture of alluring melodies and slashing guitar textures has had a major impact on '90s rock, is taking the opposite route. The group has gone from the giant Warner Bros. record family to tiny Sub Pop, which will release the Mary Chain's "Munki" album on June 9.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1996 | Robert Hilburn
Look for a commercial and cultural explosion in March when the second Rage Against the Machine album arrives. If the yet-to-be-named collection lives up to the promise and power of the Southern California group's 1992 debut and its show-stealing appearances on the 1993 Lollapalooza tour, the package should catapult Rage to a position alongside Pearl Jam, Nine Inch Nails and Hole as the American leaders in '90s rock. Led by the passionate, charismatic Zack de la Rocha, 24 (above, foreground)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1995
Your Blur vs. Oasis article ("The Battle of Britain," by Robert Hilburn, Oct. 1) was paper wasted on two pointless groups who are to England what the New Kids on the Block were to America: mindless pop music for boy-crazy teen-age girls. To say that English music of the '80s seemed "superficial and weightless" is utterly ridiculous. New Order, the Jesus and Mary Chain, the Smiths, Echo & the Bunnymen and the Stone Roses made some of the greatest music of the decade. New English bands such as Portishead, the Chemical Brothers, Swervedriver, Massive Attack and Aphex Twin continue to make fantastically innovative music, but punk-obsessed American alternative music fans couldn't care less.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1994 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI
Scottish brothers Jim and William Reid of the Jesus and Mary Chain began their career a decade ago, burying delicate melodies under countless strata of distorted guitar. They're a few links further along their fraternal chain these days and are now content to let their languorous, lovelorn pop tunes jangle without any noisy embellishment.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1990 | ROBERT HILBURN
Remember the 20-minute performances? Remember the nights with no encores? Remember the way the band was so intimidated by trying to re-create the alluring textures of its albums that it seemed almost apologetic for even stepping on stage? Then you remember the old Jesus and Mary Chain. On Thursday night at the Universal Amphitheatre, the new--and improved--Jesus and Mary Chain stood proud. The concert ran a full 75 minutes. The group did two encore numbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spend a while chatting with a Red Hot Chili Pepper about life on the "Lollapalooza '92" tour, which begins a three-day stop today at Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre, and you get the penthouse view: The vista could hardly be more panoramic, or the accommodations more satisfactory.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1994 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
'Stoned & Dethroned" serves as more than the title for the Jesus and Mary Chain's sixth album. It can also be seen as a bittersweet summary of the band's own frustrating career misfortunes. Despite the most consistently exciting and influential music of anyone from across the Atlantic since U2, the Mary Chain is still struggling to build an audience in this country.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1994 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Terrific gimmick and some terrific music, though the real fuel of this solar-powered project is the dynamic superstar live performances of R.E.M. ("Drive") and U2 (a soaring "Until the End of the World"). It's impossible to maintain those highs throughout a 16-song compilation, but the disparate selections here are almost uniformly worthy. Top moments range from smoothie Annie Lennox to forceful Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy to rambunctious L7, while earnestly shambling troubadours James and dark noise-meisters the Jesus and Mary Chain and Sonic Youth also stand out. The one loser: Soundgarden with former Queen guitarist Brian May, a teaming that emphasizes the bombastic elements of each without their sometimes redeeming grace.
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