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ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2006
AS a mother and grandmother, I was outraged after reading your article on the documentary film "Jesus Camp" ["God's Boot Camp?," by Gina Piccalo, Sept. 25]. It is not only Pastor Becky Fischer, founder of the controversial evangelical Christian children's camp, who should be vilified for exploiting children to propagandize a right-wing political agenda. Parents should also be held accountable for allowing their children to be psychologically abused under the guise of religion. PHYLLIS LANDIS Los Angeles Ihave seen the YouTube preview for the film "Jesus Camp."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
For many Americans, abortion is a political issue. Though many of us may participate in marches, make donations, vote for candidates based solely on their stands on abortion, it remains mostly a theoretical issue. But for some people, abortion, and the conflict surrounding it, defines their daily life. "12th and Delaware," a documentary by Oscar nominees Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady ("Jesus Camp"), offers a glimpse into the literal intersection of those who support legal abortion and those who do not. On one side of the street in Fort Pierce, Fla., A Woman's World provides abortions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
You'll never think about summer camp the same way after you've seen how they do things in "Jesus Camp." And that's not the only illusion this unsettling documentary shatters. Though most Americans like to believe that what we have in common unites us more than our differences pull us apart, the uncompromising zeal of the charismatic branch of evangelical Christianity portrayed in the film -- God's soldiers determined to "break the power of the devil in this nation" -- calls that into question.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2010 | By KENNETH TURAN, Film Critic
It's not like Rachel Grady and Heidi Ewing are new to the making of powerful documentaries. But even for them "12th and Delaware," which debuted Sunday at Sundance, was a disturbing, unnerving experience they don't hesitate to describe as life-changing. When Ewing half-jokingly tells someone, "I hope it haunts you for the rest of your days," she is referring as well to what it did to them. To say that the subject of their heart-rending new film is abortion in America is in some ways not saying enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2010 | By KENNETH TURAN, Film Critic
It's not like Rachel Grady and Heidi Ewing are new to the making of powerful documentaries. But even for them "12th and Delaware," which debuted Sunday at Sundance, was a disturbing, unnerving experience they don't hesitate to describe as life-changing. When Ewing half-jokingly tells someone, "I hope it haunts you for the rest of your days," she is referring as well to what it did to them. To say that the subject of their heart-rending new film is abortion in America is in some ways not saying enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2006
IN response to the two letters in the Sept. 30 Calendar that took offense to the film "Jesus Camp," we should all rejoice in the fact that some people do care enough about our kids to give them something other than video games and mindless, continuous entertainment. It is crucial in these times that our kids be trained to be adults of substance and strong moral convictions if our nation is to survive. We must equip our young with the appropriate spiritual weaponry to be able to stand firm in the ongoing battle against moral corruption and all forms of evil.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2007 | Tina Daunt, Times Staff Writer
narrowed from a field of 81 -- received Oscar nominations in the best documentary category. With hand-held cameras and stripped-down techniques, the films delve into serious topics about contemporary politics. "An Inconvenient Truth," director Davis Guggenheim's film about former Vice President Al Gore's efforts to bring awareness to the devastating effects of global warming, received two Oscar nominations, one for documentary and another for song (Melissa Etheridge's "I Need to Wake Up."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2007 | Deborah Netburn
What you'll be talking about: the Shins. Before 2004, the Shins were a semi-successful indie pop band whose fans considered themselves "in the know." Then Zach Braff's film "Garden State" came out and thousands of swooning teens watched as a beguiling Natalie Portman told Braff's character the band's music would change his life. Now the Shins are beloved not only by informed followers of music, but sorority sisters and their boyfriends as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2006 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
"Jesus Camp," a documentary feature film that follows evangelical Christian children at a religious summer camp, won prizes and critical praise on the summer festival circuit, but it wasn't until its quiet opening in the Midwest two weeks ago that a news clip about the film hit YouTube.com, inciting a whirlwind of controversy. Already, the movie, which opens in L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
For many Americans, abortion is a political issue. Though many of us may participate in marches, make donations, vote for candidates based solely on their stands on abortion, it remains mostly a theoretical issue. But for some people, abortion, and the conflict surrounding it, defines their daily life. "12th and Delaware," a documentary by Oscar nominees Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady ("Jesus Camp"), offers a glimpse into the literal intersection of those who support legal abortion and those who do not. On one side of the street in Fort Pierce, Fla., A Woman's World provides abortions.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2007 | Tina Daunt, Times Staff Writer
narrowed from a field of 81 -- received Oscar nominations in the best documentary category. With hand-held cameras and stripped-down techniques, the films delve into serious topics about contemporary politics. "An Inconvenient Truth," director Davis Guggenheim's film about former Vice President Al Gore's efforts to bring awareness to the devastating effects of global warming, received two Oscar nominations, one for documentary and another for song (Melissa Etheridge's "I Need to Wake Up."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2007 | Deborah Netburn
What you'll be talking about: the Shins. Before 2004, the Shins were a semi-successful indie pop band whose fans considered themselves "in the know." Then Zach Braff's film "Garden State" came out and thousands of swooning teens watched as a beguiling Natalie Portman told Braff's character the band's music would change his life. Now the Shins are beloved not only by informed followers of music, but sorority sisters and their boyfriends as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2006
IN response to the two letters in the Sept. 30 Calendar that took offense to the film "Jesus Camp," we should all rejoice in the fact that some people do care enough about our kids to give them something other than video games and mindless, continuous entertainment. It is crucial in these times that our kids be trained to be adults of substance and strong moral convictions if our nation is to survive. We must equip our young with the appropriate spiritual weaponry to be able to stand firm in the ongoing battle against moral corruption and all forms of evil.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2006
AS a mother and grandmother, I was outraged after reading your article on the documentary film "Jesus Camp" ["God's Boot Camp?," by Gina Piccalo, Sept. 25]. It is not only Pastor Becky Fischer, founder of the controversial evangelical Christian children's camp, who should be vilified for exploiting children to propagandize a right-wing political agenda. Parents should also be held accountable for allowing their children to be psychologically abused under the guise of religion. PHYLLIS LANDIS Los Angeles Ihave seen the YouTube preview for the film "Jesus Camp."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
You'll never think about summer camp the same way after you've seen how they do things in "Jesus Camp." And that's not the only illusion this unsettling documentary shatters. Though most Americans like to believe that what we have in common unites us more than our differences pull us apart, the uncompromising zeal of the charismatic branch of evangelical Christianity portrayed in the film -- God's soldiers determined to "break the power of the devil in this nation" -- calls that into question.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2006 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
"Jesus Camp," a documentary feature film that follows evangelical Christian children at a religious summer camp, won prizes and critical praise on the summer festival circuit, but it wasn't until its quiet opening in the Midwest two weeks ago that a news clip about the film hit YouTube.com, inciting a whirlwind of controversy. Already, the movie, which opens in L.A.
NEWS
August 16, 2007 | Elina Shatkin
Often relegated to the mustiest corner of the filmmaking world, the documentary genre takes center stage at DocuWeek, an annual showcase of nonfiction filmmaking. Hosted by the International Documentary Assn., the event is designed to help documentaries, already a tough sell for many theater owners, meet the increasingly stringent requirements for Oscar consideration while raising the genre's profile among the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
First came the bestselling book, then the sequel, and now comes "Freakonomics" the movie, a kind of victory lap that both celebrates that success and demonstrates why the work of economist Steven D. Levitt and journalist Stephen J. Dubner has become an international phenomenon. With the original book selling more than 4 million copies and getting translated into 35 languages, not to mention spending two-plus years on the New York Times bestseller list, Dubner and Levitt's penchant for looking at economic data in adventurous ways and coming up with counterintuitive results has clearly touched a cultural nerve.
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