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NEWS
June 27, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If faith alone could cure, Ernie Cohen surely would be a healthy man. Afflicted with AIDS and diabetes, Cohen, 39, has taken all kinds of treatments--insulin, AZT, radiation, vitamins, herbs and acupuncture. Now he is turning to "miracle" water from a well belonging to a wealthy rancher who just happens to be named Jesus. "I know it works," said an earnest Cohen, picking at the quick of his bitten thumbnail. "Of course, a lot has to do with faith. I believe God has touched the water.
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NEWS
June 27, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If faith alone could cure, Ernie Cohen surely would be a healthy man. Afflicted with AIDS and diabetes, Cohen, 39, has taken all kinds of treatments--insulin, AZT, radiation, vitamins, herbs and acupuncture. Now he is turning to "miracle" water from a well belonging to a wealthy rancher who just happens to be named Jesus. "I know it works," said an earnest Cohen, picking at the quick of his bitten thumbnail. "Of course, a lot has to do with faith. I believe God has touched the water.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1988 | CRAIG LEE
After the initial 15 minutes of media controversy (riots! feedback! 15-minute sets! bad attitudes!), Scotland's Jesus and Mary Chain seemed to have lost some of its initial steam. The group's second album, "Darklands," eschewed a lot of the guitar noise that made the band infamous, while its latest release, "Barbed Wire Kisses," is primarily a collection of English B-sides and obscure cover versions instead of new material. The band's last show in town, using drum tapes, was spotty at best.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1988 | CRAIG LEE
After the initial 15 minutes of media controversy (riots! feedback! 15-minute sets! bad attitudes!), Scotland's Jesus and Mary Chain seemed to have lost some of its initial steam. The group's second album, "Darklands," eschewed a lot of the guitar noise that made the band infamous, while its latest release, "Barbed Wire Kisses," is primarily a collection of English B-sides and obscure cover versions instead of new material. The band's last show in town, using drum tapes, was spotty at best.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1992 | ROBERT HILBURN
After establishing themselves in 1989 as the most significant British rock arrival since Jesus & Mary Chain in the mid-'80s, the Stone Roses--led by singer Ian Brown and guitarist John Squire--were a legitimate pick to succeed in 1990 and 1991. The Manchester quartet's debut album was an appealing blend of youthful irreverence, songwriting craft and contemporary dance-funk strains. But the band got involved in a dispute with its British record company and never got around to releasing the second album or touring the U.S. Meanwhile, other English outfits--including Jesus Jones, EMF and Charlatans U.K.--scored here with variations of the Stone Roses sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1988 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Hollywood heartthrob Patrick Swayze is still keeping his distance from a "Dirty Dancing" sequel. But he has agreed to write and perform a new song in "Road House," a United Artists film that he recently finished shooting here. The film also features a live on-camera performance by the Cruzados, who do a new song called "Don't Throw Stones". . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1989 | CHRIS WILLMAN
In the band's seminal days early this decade, the Psychedelic Furs seemed strongly influenced by David Bowie's avant-garde side, in their own unique post-punk way. With their last and most successful album, 1987's commercial breakthrough "Midnight to Midnight," some early fans thought the band had followed Bowie's lead once more--by selling out. The new album, "Book of Days," should assuage those fears.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1989 | CHRIS WILLMAN
In the band's seminal days early this decade, the Psychedelic Furs seemed strongly influenced by David Bowie's avant-garde side, in their own unique post-punk way. With their last and most successful album, 1987's commercial breakthrough "Midnight to Midnight," some early fans thought the band had followed Bowie's lead once more--by selling out. The new album "Book of Days" should assuage those fears.
NEWS
September 11, 2003 | Jessica Hundley, Special to The Times
Brian Reitzell is not a music supervisor. Never mind the fact that he's been instrumental in creating, collaborating on and overseeing the soundtracks to three feature films (he's currently working on his fourth). Brian Reitzell is not a music supervisor. "To be honest, I still don't even know what the term means," says Reitzell, who is credited as the "music producer" for director Sofia Coppola's sophomore effort, "Lost in Translation," which opens Friday. "It all just sort of fell into my lap."
NEWS
May 8, 2003 | Adam Bregman, Special to The Times
Around 9:30 on a Friday night, a black-clad and powdery-faced throng has congregated in the parking lot behind an Indian restaurant. But the ghoulish-looking faces in the crowd don't look as if they've come for the aloo gobi or tandoori chicken. They're here for Funeral, an all-ages goth club decked out with candlelit tables, fog machines, a glowing jack-o'-lantern, a small bar run by turbaned employees of the restaurant, and a dance floor and DJ separated by a large coffin.
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