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Jesus Pimentel

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2009 | By Valerie J. Nelson
After boxing's Melville Himmelfarb started going by Harry Kabakoff, sportswriters invariably marveled over the unorthodox trading of one unwieldy name for another. Why not "Tyrone Youngblood" or something with "Lancelot" in it?, The Times' Jim Murray wrote in 1979. The re-christened Kabakoff, once known as the premier handler of Mexican fighters in the U.S., always said he took the name of his uncle to honor his relative, a successful boxer. Kabakoff, who had cancer, died Tuesday of cardiac arrest at Northridge Hospital Medical Center, said Jesse Pimentel, who considered Kabakoff his grandfather.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2009 | By Valerie J. Nelson
After boxing's Melville Himmelfarb started going by Harry Kabakoff, sportswriters invariably marveled over the unorthodox trading of one unwieldy name for another. Why not "Tyrone Youngblood" or something with "Lancelot" in it?, The Times' Jim Murray wrote in 1979. The re-christened Kabakoff, once known as the premier handler of Mexican fighters in the U.S., always said he took the name of his uncle to honor his relative, a successful boxer. Kabakoff, who had cancer, died Tuesday of cardiac arrest at Northridge Hospital Medical Center, said Jesse Pimentel, who considered Kabakoff his grandfather.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1997 | JOE FRANCO
As ugly as boxing has become in recent years, Jesus Pimentel still professes a love for the sport he once terrorized as a world-class bantamweight. "My kid asks me once in a while, 'Dad, if you could start all over, would you box again?' " said Pimentel, a 19-year resident of North Hills. "I tell him, 'You're darn right. It's a great sport.' " Pimentel, 57, was one of the most feared fighters of his era, amassing an 81-7 record with 72 knockouts through the 1960s and early '70s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1997 | JOE FRANCO
As ugly as boxing has become in recent years, Jesus Pimentel still professes a love for the sport he once terrorized as a world-class bantamweight. "My kid asks me once in a while, 'Dad, if you could start all over, would you box again?' " said Pimentel, a 19-year resident of North Hills. "I tell him, 'You're darn right. It's a great sport.' " Pimentel, 57, was one of the most feared fighters of his era, amassing an 81-7 record with 72 knockouts through the 1960s and early '70s.
SPORTS
July 1, 1995 | MIKE HISERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These are the hands that once formed the fists of one of the most-punishing punchers in professional boxing. They are strong hands, with worn, stained and bent fingers. These are the hands of Jesus Pimentel, perhaps the greatest bantamweight fighter who never won a world championship. Now they are a grandfather's hands, gently and lovingly stroking the arms and legs of grandson Andrew Christian as the stocky 4-month-old snuggles into a portable bassinet for an afternoon nap.
SPORTS
November 8, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
Boxing keeps turning up the volume on the hype. Apparently, if you sell it loudly, fewer will notice if it is lousy. Oscar De La Hoya, never lousy in the ring, was presenting a card of boxers at a media gathering the other day for a Saturday night show at Staples Center. It is a card headlined by little guys, bantamweights (118 pounds) and super bantamweights (122). "These are tremendous, tremendous fighters," said De La Hoya, champion of the double gushy adjective. They may turn out to be. But there will be those there Saturday night to watch Abner Mares versus Anselmo Moreno in the main event and Leo Santa Cruz versus Victor Zaleta in the semi-main who will remember when there was no question, when the little guys were kings in Los Angeles boxing.
SPORTS
October 9, 1999 | STEVE SPRINGER
They pulled the plug on boxing in Los Angeles last week. It happened with little fanfare, scant notice. Only 891 people went by to pay their last respects to Forum Boxing at the organization's final boxing show in the Inglewood arena. Jerry Buss was there, as well he should have been.
SPORTS
May 9, 1991 | ALLAN MALAMUD
Elden Campbell made rookie mistakes Wednesday night at the Forum at a time when a rookie should not have been playing, and it cost the Lakers the game. The two nights in Queens could have been a lot better for Darryl Strawberry--or a lot worse. . . . Positives: He doubled his home run total, raised his batting average, stole a base and wasn't hit in the head by a strawberry. . . .
SPORTS
July 1, 1995 | MIKE HISERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These are the hands that once formed the fists of one of the most-punishing punchers in professional boxing. They are strong hands, with worn, stained and bent fingers. These are the hands of Jesus Pimentel, perhaps the greatest bantamweight fighter who never won a world championship. Now they are a grandfather's hands, gently and lovingly stroking the arms and legs of grandson Andrew Christian as the stocky 4-month-old snuggles into a portable bassinet for an afternoon nap.
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