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ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2004 | From Associated Press
Action star Jet Li suffered a slight injury to his foot as he protected his daughter from tsunami waves that flooded his hotel in the Maldives, Hong Kong newspapers reported Tuesday. Li, who played the villain in 1998's "Lethal Weapon 4," was with his daughter in the hotel lobby Sunday when waves gushed into the hotel, the Apple Daily newspaper reported, quoting a friend vacationing with Li.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Expendables 2"arrives jam-packed and fully loaded with main man Sly Stallone still leading the charge, followed by that wild bunch of aging brawn. There is some new blood in Liam Hemsworth and a lot of very old blood with nearly every AARP action hero in the book turning up at some point. And the kill count reaches into the ca-zillions. But somehow all that testosterone-infused blow-'-em-up craziness turns out to be kind of a kick. Director Simon West hasn't messed much with the basic formula of Barney's (Stallone)
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NEWS
December 2, 2004 | Susan King
Hero Jet Li, Zhang Ziyi Miramax, $30 Chinese director Zhang Yimou, best known for lush period dramas such as "Raise the Red Lantern," turns his attention to the martial arts genre in this slow but visually stunning action-drama. Jet Li, who has been wasted in American movies, gives one of his best performances as a warrior with no name who arrives at an emperor's palace with much pomp and circumstance and three weapons, each one belonging to an assassin bent on killing the ruler.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2009 | Associated Press
The king of kung fu cinema is set to star in a new movie about China's famed shrine of martial arts, the Shaolin Temple. Jackie Chan will star in the $29-million production, "Shaolin," the latest screen portrayal of the 1,500-year-old temple in central China whose famous fighting monks have featured in films by stars such as Bruce Lee and Jet Li, and in the 1970s TV series "Kung Fu" with David Carradine. Chan's Chinese-language film will costar veteran Hong Kong actor Andy Lau, actor-singer Nicholas Tse and Chinese actress Fan Bingbing.
NEWS
April 12, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Jackie Chan and Jet Li's first movie together is about an American teenager's fantasy journey to ancient China to rescue a mythological monkey king, the film's U.S. distributor, Lionsgate, said Wednesday. "The Forbidden Kingdom" will start shooting May 2 in studios in Hengdian, located southwest of Shanghai, and neighboring locations, said the movie's producer, Casey Silver. The project has drawn attention because it pairs the world's top two kung fu stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2001 | JAN STUART, FOR THE TIMES
In the days when Jerry Lewis had more movie fans than charity supporters, the ultimate dream for Lewis acolytes was a picture in which their hero played multiple roles. But one man's dream could be another's worst nightmare, as was the case for the many who fled "The Family Jewels" in search of a sedative, if not a reason to go on living.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2006 | Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune
"Jet Li's Fearless" is one of those corny, lusciously mounted, almost predictably thrill-packed action movies you can't help but enjoy, if you have any susceptibility to the rock-'em-kick-'em genre that produced Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan and "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon."
NEWS
January 24, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Martial arts expert Jet Li is extraordinary to watch on screen and he has some spectacular fight sequences in the suspense thriller "Kiss of the Dragon," which was produced and co-written by French filmmaker Luc Besson ("La Femme Nikita"). But even the presence of Li can't help this extremely violent and often misogynistic film about a tough Chinese government agent who becomes embroiled in a conspiracy when he is sent to Paris on a top-secret mission.
NEWS
September 21, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
JET LI has been distressed at his encounters with young people, not only in China but also around the globe. "On the street, I see a lot of young teenagers saying, 'Hey, Jet Li. Beat up somebody! Fight! Fight!' It makes me think that they think Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan and Jet Li only know how to beat up somebody." After making martial arts movies for 26 years, the 43-year-old actor is ringing down the curtain on that part of his career with "Jet Li's Fearless," which opens Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
"The Forbidden Kingdom" is kung fu light, the kind of martial arts family film that results when the director who made "Stuart Little" and "The Lion King" gets to work with Jackie Chan and Jet Li. Of course, the great martial arts films of the past didn't exactly feature scripts by Ingmar Bergman or Graham Greene. What they did have was a hard-core integrity that reveled in exhilarating action and didn't worry overly much about market share.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
For the last few years, Michael Angarano has been concentrating on independent films, so when he learned about the Jackie Chan-Jet Li martial arts adventure "The Forbidden Kingdom" at a basketball game with his agent, he wasn't certain that would be the film for him. "You never know what you could be doing next," says the 20-year-old actor. "It was exciting, though it wasn't something I obsessed over. I knew just as well that it could not be the next thing I would be doing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
"The Forbidden Kingdom" is kung fu light, the kind of martial arts family film that results when the director who made "Stuart Little" and "The Lion King" gets to work with Jackie Chan and Jet Li. Of course, the great martial arts films of the past didn't exactly feature scripts by Ingmar Bergman or Graham Greene. What they did have was a hard-core integrity that reveled in exhilarating action and didn't worry overly much about market share.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Perhaps the best of the three features being released on DVD today, "Shoot 'Em Up" (New Line, $29) casts magnetic leading man Clive Owen as an angry loner who finds himself protecting an infant -- after he delivers the baby in a warehouse amid a raucous gunfight. Over-the-top in every possible way, the action-thriller also features a memorable turn from Paul Giamatti, who seems to be enjoying himself playing against type as a well-groomed but sleazoid hit man; Monica Bellucci plays a lactating prostitute -- yes, you read that right -- who serves as the baby's surrogate mother.
NEWS
April 12, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Jackie Chan and Jet Li's first movie together is about an American teenager's fantasy journey to ancient China to rescue a mythological monkey king, the film's U.S. distributor, Lionsgate, said Wednesday. "The Forbidden Kingdom" will start shooting May 2 in studios in Hengdian, located southwest of Shanghai, and neighboring locations, said the movie's producer, Casey Silver. The project has drawn attention because it pairs the world's top two kung fu stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2006 | Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune
"Jet Li's Fearless" is one of those corny, lusciously mounted, almost predictably thrill-packed action movies you can't help but enjoy, if you have any susceptibility to the rock-'em-kick-'em genre that produced Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan and "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon."
NEWS
September 21, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
JET LI has been distressed at his encounters with young people, not only in China but also around the globe. "On the street, I see a lot of young teenagers saying, 'Hey, Jet Li. Beat up somebody! Fight! Fight!' It makes me think that they think Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan and Jet Li only know how to beat up somebody." After making martial arts movies for 26 years, the 43-year-old actor is ringing down the curtain on that part of his career with "Jet Li's Fearless," which opens Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER NOXON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Four years ago, Jet Li decided he was done with movies and martial arts. The thoughtful, energetic native of Beijing had just turned 34 and was feeling increasingly burned out and beaten up after a long run as a superstar of Hong Kong cinema and as a master of the modern form of kung fu known as wushu. "I started to feel very tired--physically and creatively," he says. "I had trained and worked since I was 8 years old. I wanted to change my life and focus on the next level."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"You know those movies, with Chinese guys kicking and screaming all the time?" a woman named Jessica asks in "Kiss of the Dragon." Yes, Jessica, we do know those movies, and this is one of them. The latest example of the mainstreaming of Asian action stars, "Kiss of the Dragon" is a vehicle tailored to the talents of Jet Li, who produced the film and came up with its story, about a Chinese secret agent trapped in Paris, in addition to taking the lead role.
WORLD
December 4, 2005 | Ching-Ching Ni, Times Staff Writer
Shi Yongxin wears a bright yellow robe and heavy prayer beads and lives in an ancient shrine high up in the mountains of central China. Yet he spends a lot of his time traveling in a chauffeur-driven jeep, jet-setting around the world and hobnobbing with Hollywood types. No wonder some people call him a CEO in a monk's robe. As abbot of the world-famous Shaolin Temple, the holy land of kung fu, Shi indeed plays multiple roles.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2005 | Steven Rosen
Something strange and unexpected happens partway through "Unleashed," the new Jet Li martial arts film. The stylized world of male brutality and violence abruptly halts and, for a half-hour or so, the story is dominated by the friendship between Li's character and an exuberant young woman with auburn hair, braces and a love for piano. She teaches him to love Mozart, savor vanilla ice cream, eat properly at the dining table, and even appreciate an endearing kiss.
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