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Jet Noise

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1999
Re "Airport Panel OKs Noise Reduction Plan," July 30. On July 28, I attended a 2 1/2-hour farce put on (and it was a put-on) by the Los Angeles city airport commissioners. Many speakers complained about the obnoxious noises from the Van Nuys Airport's jets. When two speakers, representing different groups, reported that the commissioners had refused their phone calls and ignored their letters, the final decision became only too apparent. The legitimacy of the complaints was clear when a low-flying jet made conversation impossible.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
The Boeing 737 screams out of John Wayne Airport, lifting into the thin, misty clouds over Newport Beach. With its distinctive Southwest Airlines stripes, the jet soars toward the gunmetal gray waters of Upper Newport Bay and then drifts over the multimillion-dollar homes in Dover Shores, where residents are just beginning their Monday. "He didn't turn," notes aviation consultant Ken Shapero, peering skyward. Departing from one of America's most restricted airports - over a city where residents have used their money and political might to fight for peace and quiet - is no simple task.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2011 | By Mike Reicher, Los Angeles Times
The Federal Aviation Administration has successfully completed tests for a new John Wayne Airport flight path, and planes will start flying the new route this month. The procedure is the result of a nearly one-year tussle between Newport Beach residents and FAA officials, who agreed to modify a new satellite-based navigation system after residents complained about jet engine noise in the skies above some homes. The new route, called STREL, replaces two others that had raised the ire of residents on the east side of upper Newport Bay and in the Irvine Terrace neighborhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
In addition to that famously steep takeoff from John Wayne Airport, passengers aboard some departing jets in Orange County might be asked to endure multiple turns as pilots take a zigzag course as they lift off over Newport Beach. The zigzag takeoff pattern - meant to reduce jet noise in the beach city - would be a first in the continental U.S. Over the decades, the city has fought and sued in an effort to tame noise from the commercial airport, and flights in and out of John Wayne are now some of the most strictly controlled in the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1991
Los Angeles County officials will apply to the Federal Aviation Administration for more than $67 million to diminish the impact of jet noise from Los Angeles International Airport on homes in Lennox. The County Board of Supervisors approved the application Tuesday. Up to 2,022 homes could be soundproofed and 52 more purchased and demolished if the 10-year program is funded by the federal agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1986
Richard Cox, chief of the Federal Aviation Administration's Terminal Radar Approach Control Vision at LAX, states (Aug. 2) that the jet noise levels measured in the Calabasas Highlands area ranged from 55 to 74 decibels. This should certainly be acceptable to Woodland Hills' Melvin Lees. My suggestion is that the jets be rerouted back to overfly Woodland Hills as in 1969, since it appears that the jet noise is now much lower than it was then. This is significant when one considers that Woodland Hills is further inland than Calabasas Highlands (by 1 1/2 miles)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
The Boeing 737 screams out of John Wayne Airport, lifting into the thin, misty clouds over Newport Beach. With its distinctive Southwest Airlines stripes, the jet soars toward the gunmetal gray waters of Upper Newport Bay and then drifts over the multimillion-dollar homes in Dover Shores, where residents are just beginning their Monday. "He didn't turn," notes aviation consultant Ken Shapero, peering skyward. Departing from one of America's most restricted airports - over a city where residents have used their money and political might to fight for peace and quiet - is no simple task.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1991
The letters from Bernard Feldman and M.D. Ludington ("Time for Action on Air Station Noise," Aug. 25) concerning the training flights out of El Toro Marine Corps Air Station first puzzled and then appalled me. The key word is training. If it weren't for the superb training of our El Toro fliers (and all the other service personnel in our armed forces), the Persian Gulf crisis probably would not have concluded with such stunning success. To those two letter writers I say, those pilots are your pilots.
NEWS
March 15, 1987
The FAA wants to expand Long Beach Airport to 40-plus flights per day to provide for the needs of the traveling public. Such compassion and sensitivity, indeed! If both the FAA and Judge Laughlin E. Waters (U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals) were truly concerned about people, they wouldn't be ramming jet noise down the neighborhood's throat. When will they look beyond the profit to be made by the carriers and realize that bigger isn't always better when it involves extreme degradation of living quality?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2000
More than a hundred people who live beneath flight patterns at Los Angeles International Airport demanded Monday that airport officials do something to reduce jet noise. They left the heated, raucous meeting at the Proud Bird Restaurant near the airport with a promise from airport officials to host a series of community forums beginning in September to discuss the problem. Airport officials had proposed in December that such meetings be held, but none have been convened to date.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2011 | By Mike Reicher, Los Angeles Times
The Federal Aviation Administration has successfully completed tests for a new John Wayne Airport flight path, and planes will start flying the new route this month. The procedure is the result of a nearly one-year tussle between Newport Beach residents and FAA officials, who agreed to modify a new satellite-based navigation system after residents complained about jet engine noise in the skies above some homes. The new route, called STREL, replaces two others that had raised the ire of residents on the east side of upper Newport Bay and in the Irvine Terrace neighborhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2010 | By Maeve Reston
The noisiest jets at Van Nuys Airport will be phased out over the next six years with a new law approved unanimously by the Los Angeles City Council on Friday, but residents may not notice a difference for several years. A debate over noise around the San Fernando Valley airport, one of the busiest general aviation centers in the nation, has spanned several decades. Officials have tried to mitigate the sound through an overnight departure curfew that begins at 10 p.m. and a residential soundproofing program, but Councilman Tony Cardenas hailed Friday's change as the most significant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2008 | Kate Linthicum, Linthicum is a Times staff writer.
Life for campers at Dockweiler State Beach in Playa del Rey comes with whiffs of the nearby sewage treatment plant and the regular roar of jets from Los Angeles International Airport a mile away. But the recreational vehicle park's loyal patrons like the palm-tree-lined patch of asphalt, where they have ocean views and sand at their doorstep for less than $40 a night during winter. And they say they love its quirky community of renters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2006 | Ashley Powers, Times Staff Writer
At a time when Southern California airports are struggling with a soaring passenger load, a deal between Orange County and Newport Beach officials could allow the city to block John Wayne Airport from building a second runway for commercial jets.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2005 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
To let: High-rise office space with spectacular views, cool ocean breezes and ample parking. Close to major public transportation hub. Cheapest rent in town. The pitch may sound alluring, but the office market around Los Angeles International Airport remains one of the weakest in Los Angeles County. Almost a third of its 4 million square feet on West Century, La Cienega, Aviation and Sepulveda boulevards is empty and not expected to fill up anytime soon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2003 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
Airport commissioners voted Tuesday to order two studies that could eventually help reduce jet noise for communities near Los Angeles International and Van Nuys airports. The so-called Part 161 study for LAX will examine a proposal that would require planes departing at night to fly over the ocean, while the study for Van Nuys -- the busiest general-aviation airfield in the nation -- will look at a possible ban on noisy, older-generation Stage 2 business jets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2001 | RICHARD FAUSSET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major advance in the struggle over jet noise at Van Nuys Airport, the Los Angeles Board of Airport Commissioners approved a study Thursday that could lead to the federal government paying for most of a $15-million residential soundproofing program. The study also recommends expanding the airport's nighttime takeoff curfew for jet planes. Currently, only the noisiest jets are banned from taking off between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m.
NEWS
October 20, 1988 | JAMES QUINN, Times Staff Writer
The Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority has approved a controversial report that contains recommendations to help airport neighbors live with noise, including soundproofing homes and schools, compensating some owners for loss of serenity and even razing a handful of houses. The report's prime conclusion--that nothing more can be done to reduce aircraft noise at Burbank Airport--has triggered an angry reaction from airport neighbors and Los Angeles city officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2001
Re "These Birds Are Too Noisy," editorial, Aug. 25: I live in the Owens Valley. I have news for you. The Boeing 757s would be just as noisy and disruptive to our environment here at the Bishop airport as they would be if they landed at Mammoth. If Mammoth is going to have a world-class ski resort, then they should also bear the responsibility for any possible negative impacts, such as the noise of commercial airliners. If developers in Mammoth want commercial flights servicing their resort, the planes should land and take off at Mammoth airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2001 | RICHARD FAUSSET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major advance in the struggle over jet noise at Van Nuys Airport, the Los Angeles Board of Airport Commissioners approved a study Thursday that could lead to the federal government paying for most of a $15-million residential soundproofing program. The study also recommends expanding the airport's nighttime takeoff curfew for jet planes. Currently, only the noisiest jets are banned from taking off between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m.
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