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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1988
A new laboratory for long-range research and development in advanced microelectronics was dedicated Thursday at Jet Propulsion Laboratories in Pasadena. The Center for Space Microelectronics Technology will develop and test sensors and high-speed data processing devices for the U.S. space agency and the Department of Defense, the JPL said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2013 | By Tiffany Kelly and Jason Wells
The Jet Propulsion Laboratory announced this week that it has canceled its popular annual open house at its La Cañada Flintridge facility because of federal spending cuts. The event, scheduled for June 8 and 9, typically attracts crowds of more than 15,000 each day. "Everyone here is just horribly disappointed," JPL spokeswoman Veronica McGregor said. "This is an event we look forward to each year and we know the public really looks forward to attending it. " JPL has been in the process of reviewing its public outreach efforts amid pressure from NASA to cut costs to cope with federal spending reductions.
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MAGAZINE
November 12, 1989 | KAY DIEHL
AN ARM OF NASA, the JPL facility in La Canada Flintridge, is responsible for designing robot spacecraft to explore our solar system, tracking them in deep space and for advanced research in the physical sciences. Although the very popular school tours of JPL are booked through the end of the school year, there is still a way for kids to see Voyager's birthplace. Twice a month, JPL hosts Visitor Day tours that are open to individuals and family groups (children must be at least 10 years old).
OPINION
February 20, 2013 | Patt Morrison
When artist Dan Goods arrived at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, they gave him a six-month shot. In May, he'll have been there 10 years as JPL's "visual strategist. " He glued soda bottles to the roof of his Taurus to create music on an m.p.h. pipe organ. At JPL, his "Out There" sign (recycled computer-box parts) conjures the infinite in a meeting space and plaster hands he installed in the library hold curious objects. He once drilled a hole through a grain of sand to demonstrate the size of our galaxy, and then put that grain of sand in six rooms of sand that represent the universe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2013 | By Tiffany Kelly and Jason Wells
The Jet Propulsion Laboratory announced this week that it has canceled its popular annual open house at its La Cañada Flintridge facility because of federal spending cuts. The event, scheduled for June 8 and 9, typically attracts crowds of more than 15,000 each day. "Everyone here is just horribly disappointed," JPL spokeswoman Veronica McGregor said. "This is an event we look forward to each year and we know the public really looks forward to attending it. " JPL has been in the process of reviewing its public outreach efforts amid pressure from NASA to cut costs to cope with federal spending reductions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1992
Larry N. Dumas has been named deputy director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. He will be responsible for day-to-day management of the lab. Dumas, 55, succeeds Peter T. Lyman, who will retire on July 1. Dumas is a 30-year JPL veteran who has held various engineering and management positions.
OPINION
February 20, 2013 | Patt Morrison
When artist Dan Goods arrived at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, they gave him a six-month shot. In May, he'll have been there 10 years as JPL's "visual strategist. " He glued soda bottles to the roof of his Taurus to create music on an m.p.h. pipe organ. At JPL, his "Out There" sign (recycled computer-box parts) conjures the infinite in a meeting space and plaster hands he installed in the library hold curious objects. He once drilled a hole through a grain of sand to demonstrate the size of our galaxy, and then put that grain of sand in six rooms of sand that represent the universe.
NEWS
July 17, 1991 | RANDYE HODER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert J. Lang can't wait to get home from the office--just so he can start his paperwork. Lang, a physicist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, loves to spend evenings practicing origami, the ancient Japanese art of folding paper into animals, flowers and other intricate designs. By following instructions in a book for children, Lang made his first design--a dinosaur--at the age of 6.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By Diane K. Fisher
"Hello, from the children of planet Earth!" Someday, these friendly words might greet beings from another world! No one knows whether life exists anywhere else but Earth. Even if it does, no one knows whether any alien life forms might be intelligent. Or whether they might be advanced enough to have space travel. But, what if . . . ? Let's go back to 1977. The United States launches two robotic spacecraft. Robotic means they have no people in them. The spacecraft are named Voyager 1 and Voyager 2. They are going to explore the outer planets of our solar system.
SCIENCE
September 8, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
In 1977, Jimmy Carter moved into the White House, "Star Wars" and "Saturday Night Fever" premiered in theaters and the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft launched from Florida's Cape Canaveral to explore the outer solar system. In the years since, there have been five more presidents and five more "Star Wars" movies; disco has given way to punk, grunge and rap; and the Voyagers have flown billions of miles past Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Their explorations aren't over yet. As scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge marked the mission's 35th anniversary this week, they marveled that Voyager 1 was poised to leave the solar system - crossing the so-called heliopause and entering the vastness of interstellar space.
SCIENCE
September 8, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
In 1977, Jimmy Carter moved into the White House, "Star Wars" and "Saturday Night Fever" premiered in theaters and the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft launched from Florida's Cape Canaveral to explore the outer solar system. In the years since, there have been five more presidents and five more "Star Wars" movies; disco has given way to punk, grunge and rap; and the Voyagers have flown billions of miles past Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Their explorations aren't over yet. As scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge marked the mission's 35th anniversary this week, they marveled that Voyager 1 was poised to leave the solar system - crossing the so-called heliopause and entering the vastness of interstellar space.
SCIENCE
August 20, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
For more than eight years, an elite team of drivers has been maneuvering the most unusual of vehicles across treacherous and distant terrain. The drivers of the Opportunity rover, a 400-pound robot sent to scour the Martian surface for signs of water, have been navigating the Red Planet without much fanfare. But now, there's a new rover in town. Curiosity is the souped-up, tricked-out lab on wheels that landed Aug. 5. It has about five times the mass of its predecessor and boasts fancy new gadgets, including a laser-shooting red eye and a chemistry lab in its belly.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Although it boasts having "Earth's biggest selection,"Amazon.com Inc.'s reach has stretched to Mars. Better known for being an e-commerce giant, Amazon has become a major player in cloud computing, with NASA'sJet Propulsion Laboratory using the company's Amazon Web Services to store images and data collected from the Mars Exploration Rover and Mars Science Laboratory missions. With so much large-scale data processing to be done, JPL is leading the adoption of cloud computing in the federal government, said Khawaja Shams, manager for data services at La Canada Flintridge-based JPL. "At this point, JPL's data centers are filled to capacity, so we're looking for ways to cost-effectively expand the computational horsepower that we have at our disposal," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2012 | By Scott Gold
Curiosity, the largest and most advanced spacecraft ever sent to another planet, stuck its extraordinary landing Sunday night without a hitch and is poised to begin its pioneering two-year hunt for the building blocks of life - signs that Earth's creatures may not be alone in the universe. Applause erupted across the campus of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge and engineers inside mission control could be seen hugging and weeping with joy. Al Chen, an engineer on Curiosity's entry, descent and landing team, said the words that space scientists had been waiting on for 10 years: "Touchdown confirmed.
SCIENCE
June 13, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
A once-canceled space telescope is set to launch into Earth orbit, where it will search for undiscovered black holes in the Milky Way and at the hearts of other galaxies. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array will hunt for black holes that have been obscured by the dust and gas floating through space and measure how fast some of them are spinning. NuSTAR will also examine with fresh eyes the remnants of exploded stars known as supernovae. "It's a very exciting mission," said Roger Blandford, director of the Kavli Institute of Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University and a member of the NuSTAR science team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2011 | By Joe Piasecki, Los Angeles Times
Despite a $50-million budget cut, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge probably won't face another round of mass layoffs, a legislative affairs official for the agency said. Federal spending reductions have put support for space exploration and other science programs in jeopardy, but JPL's budget will remain relatively stable at $1.5 billion for the coming year. The laboratory will probably be able to avoid "another large change in workforce," said Richard O'Toole, manager of legislative affairs.
OPINION
October 5, 2010 | By Dennis V. Byrnes
I am the chief engineer for flight mechanics at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA center operated under federal government contract by the California Institute of Technology. My responsibilities include technical oversight and review of all aspects of spacecraft dynamics, trajectory design, mission design and navigation for all missions at JPL from the earliest studies to the completion of flight operations. I also serve on several review boards for other NASA missions outside of JPL. But today, I will be at the Supreme Court listening to my lawyer argue against the acting solicitor general of the United States.
NEWS
July 13, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal agents Wednesday arrested the 20-year-old self-proclaimed leader of a sophisticated group of Internet hackers on charges of illegally breaking into two computers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. Raymond Torricelli, who uses the nickname "rolex," was taken into custody at his home in New Rochelle, N.Y.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2011 | By Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
NASA's spacecraft Juno lifted off Friday in an incandescent arc over the Atlantic Ocean, the start of a five-year, 1.7-billion mile trip to Jupiter that scientists believe will unlock some of the secrets behind the origin of the solar system. NASA's spacecraft Juno lifted off Friday in an incandescent arc over the Atlantic Ocean, the start of a five-year, 1.7-billion mile trip to Jupiter that scientists believe will unlock some of the secrets behind the origin of the solar system.
OPINION
October 5, 2010 | By Dennis V. Byrnes
I am the chief engineer for flight mechanics at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA center operated under federal government contract by the California Institute of Technology. My responsibilities include technical oversight and review of all aspects of spacecraft dynamics, trajectory design, mission design and navigation for all missions at JPL from the earliest studies to the completion of flight operations. I also serve on several review boards for other NASA missions outside of JPL. But today, I will be at the Supreme Court listening to my lawyer argue against the acting solicitor general of the United States.
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