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Jet Propulsion Laboratory

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2013 | By Tiffany Kelly and Jason Wells
The Jet Propulsion Laboratory announced this week that it has canceled its popular annual open house at its La Cañada Flintridge facility because of federal spending cuts. The event, scheduled for June 8 and 9, typically attracts crowds of more than 15,000 each day. "Everyone here is just horribly disappointed," JPL spokeswoman Veronica McGregor said. "This is an event we look forward to each year and we know the public really looks forward to attending it. " JPL has been in the process of reviewing its public outreach efforts amid pressure from NASA to cut costs to cope with federal spending reductions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
March 26, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Scientists have discovered a double ring system around an icy, dark asteroid in the outer solar system. The discovery marks the first time rings have been found around any object that is not a planet. The findings were published Wednesday in the journal Nature. “It was a very exciting experience,” Jose L. Ortiz told the Los Angeles Times by email. Ortiz, of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Adalucia, is one of the authors of the paper. “I almost jumped out of my seat!” Observations made with seven different telescopes in June 2013 suggest that the two rings are dense and thin.
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MAGAZINE
November 12, 1989 | KAY DIEHL
AN ARM OF NASA, the JPL facility in La Canada Flintridge, is responsible for designing robot spacecraft to explore our solar system, tracking them in deep space and for advanced research in the physical sciences. Although the very popular school tours of JPL are booked through the end of the school year, there is still a way for kids to see Voyager's birthplace. Twice a month, JPL hosts Visitor Day tours that are open to individuals and family groups (children must be at least 10 years old).
SCIENCE
March 26, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
In a first, scientists have detected rings encircling an M&M-shaped asteroid known as Chariklo. Until now, only the solar system's four gas planets - Jupiter, Neptune, Uranus and especially Saturn - were known to have rings. "It was an extremely surprising discovery," said James Bauer, a planetary astronomer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge who was not involved in the finding. "No one has ever seen rings around a comet or an asteroid before. This is a brand-new area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1992
Larry N. Dumas has been named deputy director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. He will be responsible for day-to-day management of the lab. Dumas, 55, succeeds Peter T. Lyman, who will retire on July 1. Dumas is a 30-year JPL veteran who has held various engineering and management positions.
NEWS
July 13, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal agents Wednesday arrested the 20-year-old self-proclaimed leader of a sophisticated group of Internet hackers on charges of illegally breaking into two computers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. Raymond Torricelli, who uses the nickname "rolex," was taken into custody at his home in New Rochelle, N.Y.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You can see it from the ridge overlooking the dusty scrub of the Arroyo Seco and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's jumble of buildings. There are a couple of towers--like a pair of big grain silos--some tanks, and a network of pipes and ducts. City officials sometimes call it "Willy Wonka's Chocolate Machine."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2009 | Claire Noland
Qian Xuesen, a former Caltech rocket scientist who helped establish the Jet Propulsion Laboratory before being deported in 1955 on suspicion of being a Communist and who became known as the father of China's space and missile programs, has died. He was 98. Qian, also known as Tsien Hsue-shen, died Saturday in Beijing, China's state news agency reported. The cause was not given. Honored in his homeland for his "eminent contributions to science," Qian was credited with leading China to launch intercontinental ballistic missiles, Silkworm anti-ship missiles, weather and reconnaissance satellites and to put a human in space in 2003.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1988
The Jan. 4 articles on the training industry made a reference to Jet Propulsion Laboratory that we found grossly misleading. By describing JPL as a "client," it implied an endorsement of Transformational Technologies Inc. and Werner Erhard. This is simply not the case. The term "client" is a rather euphemistic term for the relationship we had with Transformational Technologies Inc. They had a one-day public seminar titled "Masterful Coaching" that we attended and that we determined to be inappropriate for JPL. MARY P. WONG, PHILLIP WALKER Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena The writers work in JPL's Professional Development Section.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Congressional negotiators released a $1.1-trillion omnibus spending bill for the 2014 fiscal year that's more generous to NASA's scientific endeavors than the White House's proposal, but it may be too soon to celebrate, officials said this week. The massive federal spending bill would give NASA's planetary science division $1.345 billion -- $127 million more than the White House budget request, reflecting a commitment in Congress to space exploration, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank)
SCIENCE
September 18, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Happy harvest moon! Wednesday night's full moon is known as the harvest moon because it is the closest full moon to the fall equinox, which occurs Sunday and will mark the official start of autumn. The equinox happens twice a year, once in the spring and once in the fall, when the Earth isn't tilted toward the sun or away from it. On those days, the length of day and the length of night are almost exactly the same across the planet. PHOTOS: Amazing moons of the solar system There is nothing about the harvest moon itself that makes it different from any other full moon -- it isn't bigger or brighter, or more orange -- but it does appear to stick around longer.
SCIENCE
May 30, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
When asteroid 1998 QE2 makes its closest approach to Earth on Friday, it will not be traveling alone: The massive space rock is hurtling through space accompanied by its own moon. It is not unheard of for an asteroid to have a moon, or satellite, accompanying it on its journey, but it is rare. Just 16% of asteroids that are 655 feet across or larger are part of a binary or triple system,  according to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. Asteroid 1998 QE2's moon was revealed when NASA scientists were finally able to get a closer look at the incoming asteroid using the 230-foot Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, Calif.
SCIENCE
May 8, 2013 | By Amina Khan
NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has emerged from its "spring break" and is back to work, officials at Jet Propulsion Laboratory said this week. Up next on the agenda: Drilling the second target at Yellowknife Bay. The Mars Science Laboratory mission made big news shortly before its break, turning up key evidence of life-friendly environments in its first drill sample, said mission deputy project scientist Ashwin Vasavada. The revelation came just in time. Mars slipped behind the sun during the month of April, in a phenomenon known as solar conjunction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2013 | By Tiffany Kelly and Jason Wells
The Jet Propulsion Laboratory announced this week that it has canceled its popular annual open house at its La Cañada Flintridge facility because of federal spending cuts. The event, scheduled for June 8 and 9, typically attracts crowds of more than 15,000 each day. "Everyone here is just horribly disappointed," JPL spokeswoman Veronica McGregor said. "This is an event we look forward to each year and we know the public really looks forward to attending it. " JPL has been in the process of reviewing its public outreach efforts amid pressure from NASA to cut costs to cope with federal spending reductions.
OPINION
February 20, 2013 | Patt Morrison
When artist Dan Goods arrived at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, they gave him a six-month shot. In May, he'll have been there 10 years as JPL's "visual strategist. " He glued soda bottles to the roof of his Taurus to create music on an m.p.h. pipe organ. At JPL, his "Out There" sign (recycled computer-box parts) conjures the infinite in a meeting space and plaster hands he installed in the library hold curious objects. He once drilled a hole through a grain of sand to demonstrate the size of our galaxy, and then put that grain of sand in six rooms of sand that represent the universe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1989
Voyagers 1 and 2 lift our minds, our hearts and our aspirations. They have truly "slipped the surly bonds of earth." We nominate for a Nobel Prize--and for the Cy Young award--the men and women of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. KATHY and TERRY DOOLEY Sherman Oaks
SCIENCE
September 8, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
In 1977, Jimmy Carter moved into the White House, "Star Wars" and "Saturday Night Fever" premiered in theaters and the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft launched from Florida's Cape Canaveral to explore the outer solar system. In the years since, there have been five more presidents and five more "Star Wars" movies; disco has given way to punk, grunge and rap; and the Voyagers have flown billions of miles past Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Their explorations aren't over yet. As scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge marked the mission's 35th anniversary this week, they marveled that Voyager 1 was poised to leave the solar system - crossing the so-called heliopause and entering the vastness of interstellar space.
SCIENCE
August 20, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
For more than eight years, an elite team of drivers has been maneuvering the most unusual of vehicles across treacherous and distant terrain. The drivers of the Opportunity rover, a 400-pound robot sent to scour the Martian surface for signs of water, have been navigating the Red Planet without much fanfare. But now, there's a new rover in town. Curiosity is the souped-up, tricked-out lab on wheels that landed Aug. 5. It has about five times the mass of its predecessor and boasts fancy new gadgets, including a laser-shooting red eye and a chemistry lab in its belly.
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